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Mouseguns for Self-Defense – Selection and Tactics
Disclaimer: I am not a lawyer. I am not handing out legal advice. I make no claim to be an expert on the use of firearms.
By Marshall St John
With Help from Xavier’s Nurse with a Gun.

Kel-Tec PF9 Pistol

Kel-Tec PF9 Pistol

Mouse Guns by Marshall St John

Mouse Guns by Marshall St John

Signal Mountain, TN - -(Ammoland.com)- The following are just my personal opinions and observations. If you carry a concealed weapon, you and you alone are responsible for your own actions. Also, I am writing this article from the standpoint of a “civilian,” not a law enforcement officer (LEO). Different rules and tactics apply for LEOS.

Choosing a Mousegun
I define a “mousegun” as a handgun that weighs less than 16 ounces empty, and/or will fit easily in a front pants pocket. This is my own personal definition, so take it or leave it. If you want to define a mousegun some other way, that’s fine with me.

There are many choices in the mousegun world. There are derringers, semi-auto pistols, and revolvers. There are all kinds of calibers available, from .22 long rifle on up to shotgun shells. With single or double shot derringers in particular, you can get any caliber you like, and still stay under 16 ounces, and have a pocketable firearm. On the other hand, one or two shots isn’t much. What if you have two assailants? How will you defend yourself? A few extra rounds would come in handy!

My personal recommendation for a pocket gun mousegun is some sort of semi-auto pistol in either 9mm or .380acp. Why choose a small .32acp pistol, when you can shoot a more powerful .380acp pistol that is about the same size and weight? And if you can pocket a 9mm pistol, why settle for the smaller .380acp? Of course, price and availability come into the equation, as well as “shootability.”

The 9mm round in a very small pistol may be too much for some people to handle well and comfortably. And a $1000 9mm Rohrbaugh pistol may be an ideal choice for you, but beyond your budget. The small .22 revolvers by North American Arms are too small in my opinion. And they are single-action only, which means they are difficult to shoot quickly or accurately in stressful situations. It is also my personal opinion (with which many will disagree) that the small j-frame S&W pistols are still a bit too large for comfortable pocket carry. You may feel differently, and if the j-frame works for you, that’s great!

GLOCK 26 9mm pistol

GLOCK 26 9mm pistol

Choosing a pistol is also a very personal decision. You need a pistol that you like. It doesn’t matter what anyone else says about it. If you don’t like it, then it’s not for you. It also needs to be reliable, and you can’t take anyone’s word about which pistols are reliable. Get yourself a pistol you like, and work with it. Shoot it enough so that you are confident that it will go bang if you have to pull the trigger in a time of great need. Carry it it your pocket long enough that you are confident in your ability to conceal your firearm, and carry it all day long without feeling burdened by it. I love the GLOCK 26 9mm pistol. It’s a great gun. However, as far as I am concerned, it is just a bit too heavy, and just a bit too chunky, and I can’t begin to pocket carry it. If I could, I would, but I can’t. If you can pull it off, that’s the pistol I would recommend. However, it’s going to be too large and heavy for just about everyone, I think.

My choice for a pocket mousegun is really two choices, one for weekdays and one for Sunday. I go to church every Sunday, and I wear a suit. On week days I wear khaki slacks. On weekdays I find that I can comfortably conceal a Kel-Tec PF9 in my front pocket, with no trouble at all. But I can’t do it in my suit pants on Sunday. The material is too thin, and the pants are a little tighter, and the PF9 just won’t conceal well and feel comfortable. So when I wear a suit, I carry a Kel-Tec P3AT in my front pocket, and that works very well. The Kahr PM9 and the Ruger LCP (.380acp), or a Seecamp .380 also seem to me to be fine pocketable mouseguns. Some people like the .380 pistols from North American Arms. The brand doesn’t matter. Find one that conceals easily, is comfortable to carry all day long, and is reliable in your personal experience.

Someone is probably objecting: if you are wearing a sport coat, or a suit coat, then you don’t need to carry a mousegun at all! Just carry a larger gun with an IWB (in the waist band) holster, and your coat will conceal it. That’s true. However, I find that I am often removing my coat for one reason or another, and the larger guns won’t work for me, for absolute concealment. I like a mousegun, in my front pants pocket. If you want to carry a larger gun some other way, and if that works with your lifestyle, then go for it! I would if I could, but I can’t. If you wear bluejeans every day, with an oversized untucked box-cut shirt, well don’t worry about a mousegun! I think if that was my daily dress I would carry a GLOCK 19 or a 1911 style .45 all the time. Don’t worry about caliber. Any caliber will do, if the bullets are placed in vital zones.

For more suggestions about choosing a mousegun, click here for my web page about “Defining a True Pocket Pistol.” (NOTE Website No Longer Online)

Avoid Bullets That Over-Penetrate
There is one caveat about bullets. They can pass all the way through a BG, and hit another person standing behind the BG. This is “over-penetration.” Too much penetration is a bad thing, and may lead to injuring innocent bystanders. You don’t want to end up shooting a good person, and bringing about the grief you are trying to prevent! For the smaller .380 pistols, FMJ bullets are OK. They will probably not go all the way through the body of a BG. If your pistol shoots .22 bullets, then use hollow points. For 9mm or .45acp, hollow points are preferable, as they won’t over-penetrate.

Mousegun Tactics
The most important factor with regard to tactics is a firm realization of the limitations of a mousegun. A mousegun is not suitable for engaging bad guys at long distance. Mouseguns are weapons of last resort, meant to be used really close up and personal. The purpose of a mousegun is simply to give you an edge – a chance to get out with your life. Sights are rudimentary, and mouseguns are not tack drivers. They are not range guns. They are designed to be “shot little and carried often,” not the other way around. If you are under pressure, and are armed with a mousegun, you will do amazingly well to hit a man-sized target at three yards. Fast, excited shooting at over three yards is very iffy.

Also, whatever pistol you carry, be aware that if you shoot at a bad guy who is more than just a few yards away, you are opening yourself up for a homicide charge. You may ONLY use your firearm if you are truly in life-threatening danger. If the bad guy is more than seven yards away, your life is probably not at risk, and legally it is your duty to run, not to fire your weapon, UNLESS YOU ARE A POLICEMAN.

Mouseguns are not suitable for firefights. If you are armed with only a mousegun, you do NOT run towards the gunfire. Mouseguns are strictly for personal defense. For example, if you happen to be in a shopping mall, and you hear and see a BG (bad guy) 40 yards down the hallway with an AK47, you had better realize right away that you are simply not equipped to go into battle. Grab your loved ones if they are near, and turn and run away as fast as you can. Discretion is the better part of valor. On the other hand, if you are near the BG when he pulls his AK47 out from under his coat, by all means do your best to draw and take him out. You are too close to run away, and close enough to hit your target.

If you are in an armed robbery situation in a restaurant, and the robbery is going on a room’s length away, and you are not personally threatened, then keep your seat, and do no more than get ready. If you can see your way to a rear exit, and think you can get out before the BG notices and shoots at you, then get up and leave. Get your mousegun ready for use, draw it invisibly (under the table would be good), but don’t use it unless you must. Maybe the BG won’t come to your area of the restaurant. You are not there to be a hero. Your mousegun doesn’t give you enough firepower to enable you to be a hero. You are not a policeman, either, so don’t try to act like one. Remember this: THE BEST USE OF A MOUSEGUN IS NOT TO HAVE TO USE IT AT ALL. When I say to use it only as a last resort, I mean it! Use it ONLY when you have NO OTHER OPTION AT ALL.

If you are eating in a restaurant, and an armed BG comes in, and starts lining up the patrons, or herding them to a back room, and you have no escape route, you need to be ready for a more aggressive approach. If the BG is a room’s length away from you, your mousegun may not be accurate enough to hit the BG, and if you try you may hit innocent patrons. But a deeply concealed mousegun may give you the edge you need to survive and even rescue others.

How to use your mousegun in such a situation:
1) If possible, put your hands in your pockets, and get a good grip on your mousegun; 2) Wait for the BG to get within three yards of you – two is better than three; 3) Stand or sit with your “weak side” towards the BG, and draw your mousegun in such a way that the BG can’t see what you are doing; 4) When the BG is not looking directly at you, and his firearm is not pointed at you in particular, immediately turn and immediately fire at the BG.

As Tuco said in the film The Good, the Bad and the Ugly, “When you have to shoot, shoot, don’t talk.” DON’T TALK TO THE BG. Don’t say “stop or I’ll shoot.” Don’t say, “Freeze.” Don’t say anything at all, just shoot immediately and without any warning. Shot placement is more important than bullet caliber, so shoot into the center of mass, into the neck, or the head of the BG. If you are really up close (within three feet), go for the head shot first. Don’t stop shooting until the BG is “stopped.” “Stopped” means that he is no longer a threat. Perhaps he has dropped his weapon. Perhaps he is unconcious. You will have to judge the situation, but be certain he has been STOPPED. If he is still moving and still firmly gripping his weapon, he has not yet been stopped. He should be considered dangerous and a threat to your life and the lives of those around you as long as his weapon is in his hand.

If there is more than one BG, and you have no clear exit, you should use your mousegun to take out the one nearest you. If you are successful, the second BG may flee, or he may shoot YOU. If he is not close to you, it will be difficult for you to engage him with a mousegun. If stopping the BG near you gives you an opportunity to flee out the door, do so. You are not a policeman. You probably can’t do a one-man rescue of everyone there. If you can flee, then flee. On the other hand, if the first BG has a rifle, or a larger handgun, you may be able to take it, and use it against a second BG. If there are more than two Bad Guys doing the crime, your goose is probably cooked. It’s an uncertain situation, and as always, you are in God’s hands. We may be brave and clever, or we may be stupid, but it is certainly God who decides the ultimate outcome. Silent prayer is not a bad idea, but don’t close your eyes!

Summarizing Mousegun Tactics

  1. Keep your firearm concealed as long as you can, until you are within three yards of the BG.
  2. Try to get a grip on your mousegun while it is still concealed in your pocket. This will give you a faster draw.
  3. Don’t forget that you only have a mousegun. It is not a “go to battle” weapon. It is an “escape” weapon – a weapon of last resort. Your objective is not to defeat the Bad Guys. Your objective is to save your own life. If you can exit the scene before drawing your firearm, then EXIT.
  4. Draw from your invisible side, when the BG is not looking directly at you.
  5. If it is time to shoot, then shoot. Don’t talk, shoot.
  6. Place your shots in vital areas, and shoot until the BG is stopped.
  7. Pray silently for God to guide and bless – I’m not kidding.

Finally, when the shooting is over, and the BG is not a threat any longer, put your mousegun back in your pocket, and call 911, and inform the person on the line that “there was a self-defense shooting at” your location. Don’t say that you are the shooter. Don’t say anything else. Don’t tell anyone where your mousegun is. Just put your mousegun in your pocket, and join the rest of the crowd, and wait for the police. Don’t leave the scene. Don’t talk to the other people about the shooting. Keep cool and keep quiet. Keep your mousegun in your pocket. “Out of sight is out of mind.”

Half of the people there won’t remember exactly what you did or did not do. They will not remember accurately what you say. It’s better to keep quiet. They will all be witnesses at your trial, if there is one, and you may very well be arrested and charged with a homicide. So keep your mouth shut. When the police show up, just obey orders like everyone else. When they ask “Who shot the BG,” raise your hand slowly and say “I was afraid for my life.” Don’t pull your mousegun out of your pocket until they order you to do so. Don’t say anything except, “I was afraid for my life. That’s all I can think about right now.” Don’t boast about what you did. If you are taken into custody, don’t talk with the police about the shooting. You should have already called your lawyer, right after the 911 call. If you have a permit to carry a concealed gun, you should also have already found a lawyer who handles firearm self-defense cases. His card should be in your wallet. Don’t talk with anyone else about what happened.

Some lawyers advise you to NEVER talk with the police. Not just in the few minutes after an incident but NEVER. An innocent person (YOU) can be hung by his/her own words. For example, suppose a murder happens and you tell the police truthfully that you were 20 miles away, but there is no EVIDENCE of that. Then suppose a witness makes an honest mistake and genuinely but incorrectly says he saw you two blocks from the murder. Your talking (and telling the truth) has you caught in a perceived “lie” that will look bad and help convict you. If you had not talked there would only be a witness putting you in the area. There are many other risks that talking opens up. For example, the police make a genuine mistake and misquote what you said. A policeman once commented: “Going into a interview with an experienced LEO thinking you can win is like going up against a pro boxer and expecting to win. It is naive pride.

Xavier’s Five Rules for Concealed Carry (From his Blog: Nurse with a Gun)
We all should know the Four Rules of Firearms Safety. They should be ingrained in our bones. Recently I read of the Five Rules of Concealed Carry. It was a good start, but did not quite make the grade. I have borrowed heavily from them though, and present my own Rules of Concealed Carry here.

1. Your concealed handgun is for protection of life only.
Draw your concealed firearm solely in preparation to protect yourself or an innocent third party from the wrongful and life threatening criminal actions of another. A CCW license does not give you any greater rights or responsibilities than any other citizen. It merely provides you with the means of legally carrying a firearm to protect your own life or the lives of others.

2. Know exactly when you can use your gun.
A criminal adversary must have, or reasonably appear to have:

  • a. the ability to inflict serious bodily injury (he is armed, reasonably appears to be armed with a deadly weapon, or a considerable disparity of force exists),
  • b. the opportunity to inflict serious bodily harm (he is physically positioned to harm you), and
  • c. his intent (hostile actions or words) indicates that he means to place you in jeopardy — to do you serious or fatal physical harm.

When all three of these “attack potential” elements are in place simultaneously, then you are facing a reasonably perceived deadly threat that can justify an emergency deadly force response.

3. If you can run away — RUN!
Just because you are armed does not necessarily mean you must confront a bad guy at gunpoint. Develop your “situation awareness” skills so you can be alert to detect and avoid trouble altogether. Keep in mind that if you successfully evade a potential confrontation, the single negative consequence involved might be your bruised ego, which should heal with mature rationalization. By contrast, if you force a confrontation you risk the possibility of you or a family member being killed or suffering lifelong crippling/disfiguring physical injury, criminal liability and/or financial ruin from a civil lawsuit. Flee if you can, fight only as a last resort.

4. Display your CCW, be prepared to go to jail.
You should expect to be arrested by police at gunpoint, and be charged with a crime anytime your concealed handgun is seen by another citizen in public, regardless of how unintentional, innocent or justified the situation might seem. Choose a method of carry that keeps your gun reliably hidden from public view at all times.

You have no control over how a stranger will react to seeing (or learning about) your concealed handgun. He or she might become alarmed and report you to police as a “man or woman with a gun.” Depending on his or her feelings about firearms, this person might be willing to maliciously embellish his or her story in an attempt to have your gun seized by police or to get you arrested. An alarmed citizen who reports a “man with a gun” is going to be more credible to police than you when you are stopped because you match the suspect’s description, and you are found to have a concealed handgun in your possession. Under these circumstances, you have been accused, apprehended, and are in a defensive position. If you must draw your gun, make certain you are the first to notify police.

Before you deliberately expose your gun in public, ask yourself: “Is this worth going to jail for?” The only time this question should warrant a “yes” response is when an adversary has at least, both ability and intent, and is actively seeking the opportunity to do you great harm.

5. Don’t let your emotions get the best of you.
Develop and practice self control. If, despite your best efforts to the contrary, you do get into some kind of heated dispute with another person while you are armed, never mention, imply or exhibit your gun for the purpose of intimidation or one-upmanship. You will simply make a bad situation worse — for yourself. You can carry a gun, or you can have a temper. You may even do both for a while, but it will not last very long.

With the growing population of gun toters, it is imperative that we establish a few simple guidelines to help introduce others into the world of concealed carry. These five are the best I’ve found.

Xavier has also written “The Concealed Carry Creed,” which is worth reading and reciting from time to time:

  • My weapon is for the protection of my life and the lives of others. That is its sole purpose. It does not confer rights, responsibilities or authority greater than that of other citizens. It merely allows me to protect life.
  • I will seek never to have to use my weapon. If I can avoid conflict, I will. If I can resolve conflict, I will. If I can escape danger, I will. If I am forced to bring my weapon to bear and use it, I will.
  • I will acquire superior training with my weapon. It is not the weapon that saves lives, but my effective use of the weapon. I will ensure my training is sound, my knowledge is current, and my mind is prepared.
  • I will know, understand, and obey all laws and ordinances concerning my weapon no matter where I happen to be.
  • Failure to do so harms all who seek to legally carry an effective means of self protection.
  • I will know and follow the Four Rules of safe gun handling. I am a member of a growing community that must foster and teach safe and responsible gun handling if the community is to survive.

About Mouse Guns:
Marshall St John is an active gun blogger and second amendment supporter who has blogged for many years in supports of guns and gun rights Visit: www.mouseguns.com

Ammoland Click to read AmmoLand FTC Marital Disclosures Distributed to you by - AmmoLand.com – The Shooting Sports News source.
  • 4 User comments to “Mouseguns for Self-Defense – Selection and Tactics”

    1. Respectfully, I will disagree with only one suggestion of this article; that of the concern of overpenetration. I would not want an innocent person to be hurt or killed by my rounds, stray or overpenetrating. The problem is that rounds must penetrate sufficently to stop the threat. Clothing, limbs or other obstructions may block my line of fire, and if a hollow point slug expands too soon it may not stop the threat. The reality is that simply carrying a weapon means that you have decided that it is an accceptable risk that an innocent may be killed by your hand. You mitigate that risk by training and thinking, but if you are forced to use deadly force it should be as lethal as you can possibly muster. Were it not for the BG forcing your hand, lethal force would not have been brought to bear, and no blood would be shed. Because of this, I completely agree with the author’s contention that this must be a case of last resort only.

    2. Probably a textbook case was when the nutcase in Killeen, Texas at a Luby’s cafeteria (p://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Luby’s_massacre). 23 people were killed and 20 were wounded.

      Looking at this as a worst case model, I’m of the opinion rapid and violent action is required. I’m in Austin, TX and would respond in a similar manner.

      In that incident no one was armed in the restaurant and the shooter had a field day. Therefore plan for the worst and hope for the best.

      In the military, we trained like we would fight. It worked in most cases especially with Armor units (I was a tank company commander). We were ready in the Texas Army National Guard to go. This would not be my first war.

      As a result with a mousegun, practice and training is the key for going
      home. This should include both day and night training (I realize that no range does this). Night training in Vietnam save my bacon over there.

    3. Another gun worth considering is the S&W bodyguard in .380. It comes with a laser, its small and very concealable (only weighs 12 oz.). The new critical defense loads from Hornady feed well.

    4. [...] Be aware just having a mousegun: Mouseguns for Self-Defense – Selection and Tactics [...]

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