Today is Tuesday, September 02, 2014rss RSS feed
Bald Eagle

Bald Eagles On Spring Migration Back To Minnesota

Minnesota Department of Natural Resources

Minnesota Department of Natural Resources

Minnesota --(Ammoland.com)- Bald eagles are migrating back to Minnesota and may be seen in large numbers across parts of the state over the next few weeks, according to the Department of Natural Resources.

“Ice is breaking up along the rivers, so it’s definitely time for folks to keep their eyes out,” said Lisa Gelvin-Innvaer, DNR regional nongame wildlife specialist.

“It all depends on the weather. It’s typical to see eagles coming through our area in mid-to-late March, as waters begin to open up and snow melts.”

Only two states, Florida and Alaska, have greater nesting populations of bald eagles than Minnesota. In 2005, researchers estimated there are more than 1,300 active nests in Minnesota.

Fall migration typically occurs as lakes and rivers freeze over, since most eagles prefer a diet of fish. Bald eagle wintering grounds ideally contain open water, ample food, limited human disturbance and protective roosting sites.

Not all bald eagles migrate southward in the fall, Gelvin-Innvaer said. In southern Minnesota, it’s common for some eagle pairs to stay the winter, especially during milder winters.

“This winter we’ve had a lot more snow and cold temperatures than last year,” Gelvin-Innvaer said. “It makes carrion a bit harder for eagles to find.”

Bald eagles that stay local may begin courting and nesting as early as December or January. Other bald eagles return to their breeding territories, as soon as a food source is available.

“Eagle migration hotspots are a bit of a moving target, so it’s hard to say where the eagles are right now,” Gelvin-Innvaer said. “In Minnesota, the biggest migrations tend to be along the Minnesota River corridor, the north shore of Lake Superior and around Lake Pepin in southeastern Minnesota.”

Adult bald eagles are easily identified by a white head and tail contrasting with a dark brown body. Bald eagles attain full adult plumage in their fourth or fifth year. In flight, bald eagles are sometimes confused with turkey vultures. However, bald eagles have a tendency to soar on flat, board-like wings, while turkey vultures fly with their wings in a v-shape.

Bald eagles are an example of how they and many other wildlife species benefit directly from donations made to the nongame wildlife checkoff on Minnesota tax forms. Checkoff dollars fund research, surveys and education for more than 700 nongame wildlife species. Each dollar donated is matched by funds from the Reinvest In Minnesota account.

The DNR’s nongame wildlife program is now streaming live video of a nesting pair of bald eagles on its website at www.webcams.dnr.state.mn.us/eagle. For additional information on bald eagles or where to view them, go to www.mndnr.gov/birds/eagles/winter_wabasha.html or www.mndnr.gov/snapshots/birds/baldeagle.html.

  • Leave a Comment

    • Sign up Ammoland for your Inbox

      Daily Digest

      Monthly Newsletter

    • Recent Comments

      • Bob Crooz: Actually, it was SDPD Chief Lansdowne who retired. Ruby Ridge Gore ran unopposed. I left the selection for...
      • Herb: If you favor Marxism, socialism and communism, vote for democrats. If you favor of higher prices for...
      • JamesMadison: If you are looking for a quality made 80 lower receiver for a great price, check out...
      • DebJar: Has anyone noticed that the southern border of Connecticut resembles a rifle. The little bump to the far...
      • Leo Smith: If Bloomberg realized how much of his “Money” is being redistributed he might be angry.
    • Social Activity

    • Most Popular Posts

    • AmmoLand Poll

    Copyright 2014 AmmoLand.com Shooting Sports News | Sitemap | Μολὼν λαβέ
    13642152
    14239384