Polyshok IRP To Be Reintroduced Into The Ammo Market As MaxStop IRP

MaxStop IRP Ammo
MaxStop IRP Ammo
Maxstop IRP
Maxstop IRP

Houston, Texas – -(Ammoland.com)- IRP Association, LLC has obtained the patent rights to a 12 gauge defense round for Law Enforcement know as “Polyshok IRP”.

They will reintroduce the round formerly know as Polyshok into the law enforcement and home defense ammunition market as… Maxstop IRP.

The Maxstop IRP is a patented, highly lethal and low over penetration ammunition.

“We’re extremely excited to bring back this technologically advanced ammunition. We believe it’s a perfect defense round for discerning law enforcement officials and home defense consumers. It’s a product that will enhance both their safety and that of innocent bystanders.” states Steven Jones, Managing Member of IRP Association.

The Maxstop IRP (Impact Reactive Projectile) is not large, but it hits with so much punch that it’s been described as a type of shaped charge. Because it is a powdered lead projectile, the IRP is a good option when the shooter has concerns about over penetration. It’s perfect in close quarters situations.

IRP Association LLC wants to make IRP the first choice in shotgun ammunition for Police Officers and personal defense consumers. When faced with extreme shooting situations, IRP will protect those who rely on the round’s superior performance.

Maxstop IRP will be made available nationwide starting June 2014. Visit www.MaxstopIRP.com for more information or to place a pre-order.

  • 5 thoughts on “Polyshok IRP To Be Reintroduced Into The Ammo Market As MaxStop IRP

    1. So, per the video…are they advocating shooting through a wall? Could be bad news…if someone other than a “badguy” is behind it. Oh…that’s right…this video was probably for “law enforcement” use…who cares who is on the other side of the wall?

    2. I think ammo producers need to quit selling ammo the the cops and military so that prices can come down. This is just the industries way of keeping prices sky high.

    3. I’m a bit confused, as to why they choose to demonstrate a round that does not over penetrate by shooting it through a wall at a target.

    4. Jamie.. I think the point was that the round did nothing to the clear plastic or glass pane on the other side of the “Bad Guy.” The force of the round was spent by the “Bad Guy.”

    5. We tested the orginal extensively on breaching doors and penetration tests. At that time we also tested an experimental option designed for wartime use (harder doors in the sandbox I guess)

      All performed VERY well. Roughly 18 inches behind the door was safe from the breaching round.

    Leave a Reply

    Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

    You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <strike> <strong>