New Mexico Trapping Ban Defeated

New Mexico Trapping Ban Defeated
State Game Commission Shoots Down Public Lands Trapping Ban.

U.S. Sportsmen's Alliance
U.S. Sportsmen's Alliance

Columbus, OH –-(Ammoland.com)- Last week, the New Mexico State Game Commission held a meeting to consider changes to the state’s trapping regulations. Included in the changes was a proposal that would have banned trapping on all public lands within the state.

During the meeting, the proposal to ban trapping on public lands, along with a number of other proposed restrictions on trapping, were quickly dismissed by the Game Commissioners. Also defeated was a proposal to increase many trap setback distances – the buffer between traps and trails and roadways.

“New Mexico sportsmen and trappers should thank the Game Commissioners for seeing through the anti-trapping rhetoric and instead basing the state’s trapping regulations on science,” said Rob Sexton, U.S. Sportsmen’s Alliance vice president of government affairs.

“Sportsmen in the state can breathe a little easier now that this proposal has been defeated. However, we all know that these groups will be back to take another shot at trapping in the future.”

For months, animal rights and anti-trapping organizations had been pressuring the Game Commission and government officials to ban trapping on public lands.

“This is a great win for trappers and scientific wildlife management,” said Chick Andres, President of the Fur Takers of America. “Trapping is an invaluable tool for wildlife managers in New Mexico and across the country.”

About:
The U.S. Sportsmen's Alliance is a national association of sportsmen and sportsmen's organizations that protects the rights of hunters, anglers and trappers in the courts, legislatures, at the ballot, in Congress and through public education programs. Visit www.ussportsmen.org.

  • 2 thoughts on “New Mexico Trapping Ban Defeated

    1. Joby;

      Sounds more like your just a sore looser.. trapping techniques that have existed this way for 100's of years are not going to suddenly effect tourism…LOL

    2. I'm an outdoor enthusiast and I'm anything but happy about this. I'm terrified for my dog and what might happen to her on public lands, and concerned for my children too, as a future parent of the state.

      Putting aside my own fears and ethical concerns, I also have to ask: What about tourism? Camping, hiking and backpacking on our amazing public lands is one of our biggest draws as a state, and that will crash and burn the first time a tourist (our worse, a tourist's child) is mangled by one of these traps.

      The setback is seriously only 25 yards from public trails. Are these supposed "sportsmen" so fucking lazy that they can't be bothered to walk further than that to set a trap and leave?

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