Every Mass Shooting Shares One Thing In Common & It’s NOT Weapons

Opinion

Psychotropic Drugs
Nearly Every Mass Shooting In The Last 20 Years Shares One Thing In Common, & It’s NOT Weapons
AmmoLand Gun News
AmmoLand Gun News

Manasquan, NJ –-(Ammoland.com)- Nearly every mass shooting incident in the last twenty years, and multiple other instances of suicide and isolated shootings all share one thing in common, and it’s not the weapons used.

The overwhelming evidence points to the signal largest common factor in all of these incidents is the fact that all of the perpetrators were either actively taking powerful psychotropic drugs or had been at some point in the immediate past before they committed their crimes.

Multiple credible scientific studies going back more than a decade, as well as internal documents from certain pharmaceutical companies that suppressed the information, show that SSRI drugs ( Selective Serotonin Re-Uptake Inhibitors ) have well known, but unreported side effects, including but not limited to suicide and other violent behavior. One need only Google relevant keywords or phrases to see for themselves. www.ssristories.com is one popular site that has documented over 4500 “ Mainstream Media “ reported cases from around the World of aberrant or violent behavior by those taking these powerful drugs.

The following is a list of mass shooting perpetrators and the drugs they were taking or had been taking shortly before their horrific actions.

The list was compiled and published to Facebook by John Noveske, founder and owner of Noveske Rifleworks just days before he was mysteriously killed in a single-car accident. Is there a link between Noveske’s death and his “outing” of information numerous disparate parties would prefer to suppress, for a variety of reasons?

I leave that to the individual readers to decide. But there is most certainly a documented history of people who “knew to much” or were considered a “threat” dying under extraordinarily suspicious circumstances.

Anatomy of an Epidemic: Magic Bullets, Psychiatric Drugs, and the Astonishing Rise of Mental Illness in America : http://tiny.cc/zcgh7x
Anatomy of an Epidemic: Magic Bullets, Psychiatric Drugs, and the Astonishing Rise of Mental Illness in America: Get your copy here.

From Katherine Smith, a Tennessee DMV worker who was somehow involved in helping several 9/11 hijackers in obtaining Tennessee Drivers Licenses, and was later found burned to death in her car. To Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist Gary Webb, who exposed a CIA Operation in the 80’s that resulted in the flooding of LA Streets with crack cocaine and was later found dead from two gunshot wounds to the head, but was officially ruled as a “suicide“, to Frank Olson, a senior research microbiologist who was working on the CIA’s mind-control research program MKULTRA.

After Olson expressed his desire to leave the program, he was with a CIA agent in a New York hotel room and is alleged to have committed “suicide” by throwing himself off the tenth-floor balcony.

In 1994, Olson’s sons were successful in their efforts to have their fathers body exhumed and re-examined in a second autopsy by James Starrs, Professor of Law and Forensic science at the National Law Center at George Washington University. Starr’s team concluded that the blunt force trauma to the head and injury to the chest had not occurred during the fall but most likely in the room before the fall.

The evidence was called “rankly and starkly suggestive of homicide.” Based on his findings, in 1996, the Manhattan District Attorney opened a homicide investigation into Olson’s death but was unable to find enough evidence to bring charges.

As I said, I leave it to the individual readers to make up their own minds if Noveske suffered a similar fate.

On to the list of mass shooters and the stark link to psychotropic drugs.

  • Eric Harris age 17 (first on Zoloft then Luvox) and Dylan Klebold aged 18 (Columbine school shooting in Littleton, Colorado), killed 12 students and one teacher and wounded 23 others, before killing themselves. Klebold’s medical records have never been made available to the public.
  • Jeff Weise, age 16, had been prescribed 60 mg/day of Prozac (three times the average starting dose for adults!) when he shot his grandfather, his grandfather’s girlfriend and many fellow students at Red Lake, Minnesota. He then shot himself. Ten dead, 12 wounded.
  • Cory Baadsgaard, age 16, Wahluke (Washington state) High School, was on Paxil (which caused him to have hallucinations) when he took a rifle to his high school and held 23 classmates hostage. He has no memory of the event.
  • Chris Fetters, age 13, killed his favorite aunt while taking Prozac.
  • Christopher Pittman, age 12, murdered both his grandparents while taking Zoloft.
  • Mathew Miller, age 13, hung himself in his bedroom closet after taking Zoloft for six days.
  • Kip Kinkel, age 15, (on Prozac and Ritalin) shot his parents while they slept then went to school and opened fire, killing two classmates and injuring 22 shortly after beginning Prozac treatment.
  • Luke Woodham, age 16 (Prozac) killed his mother and then killed two students, wounding six others.
  • A boy in Pocatello, ID (Zoloft) in 1998 had a Zoloft-induced seizure that caused an armed standoff at his school.
  • Michael Carneal (Ritalin), age 14, opened fire on students at a high school prayer meeting in West Paducah, Kentucky. Three teenagers were killed, five others were wounded.
  • A young man in Huntsville, Alabama (Ritalin) went psychotic chopping up his parents with an ax and also killing one sibling and almost murdering another.
  • Andrew Golden, age 11, (Ritalin) and Mitchell Johnson, aged 14, (Ritalin) shot 15 people, killing four students, one teacher, and wounding ten others.
  • TJ Solomon, age 15, (Ritalin) high school student in Conyers, Georgia opened fire on and wounded six of his classmates.
  • Rod Mathews, age 14, (Ritalin) beat a classmate to death with a bat.
  • James Wilson, age 19, (various psychiatric drugs) from Breenwood, South Carolina, took a .22 caliber revolver into an elementary school killing two young girls and wounding seven other children and two teachers.
  • Elizabeth Bush, age 13, (Paxil) was responsible for a school shooting in Pennsylvania
  • Jason Hoffman (Effexor and Celexa) – school shooting in El Cajon, California
  • Jarred Viktor, age 15, (Paxil), after five days on Paxil he stabbed his grandmother 61 times.
  • Chris Shanahan, age 15 (Paxil) in Rigby, ID who out of the blue killed a woman.
  • Jeff Franklin (Prozac and Ritalin), Huntsville, AL, killed his parents as they came home from work using a sledgehammer, hatchet, butcher knife, and mechanic’s file, then attacked his younger brothers and sister.
  • Neal Furrow (Prozac) in LA Jewish school shooting reported having been court-ordered to be on Prozac along with several other medications.
  • Kevin Rider, age 14, was withdrawing from Prozac when he died from a gunshot wound to his head. Initially, it was ruled a suicide, but two years later, the investigation into his death was opened as a possible homicide. The prime suspect, also age 14, had been taking Zoloft and other SSRI antidepressants.
  • Alex Kim, age 13, hung himself shortly after his Lexapro prescription had been doubled.
  • Diane Routhier was prescribed Welbutrin for gallstone problems. Six days later, after suffering many adverse effects of the drug, she shot herself.
  • Billy Willkomm, an accomplished wrestler and a University of Florida student, was prescribed Prozac at the age of 17. His family found him dead of suicide – hanging from a tall ladder at the family’s Gulf Shore Boulevard home in July 2002.
  • Kara Jaye Anne Fuller-Otter, age 12, was on Paxil when she hung herself from a hook in her closet. Kara’s parents said “…. the damn doctor wouldn’t take her off it and I asked him to when we went in on the second visit. I told him I thought she was having some sort of reaction to Paxil…”)
  • Gareth Christian, Vancouver, age 18, was on Paxil when he committed suicide in 2002,
  • (Gareth’s father could not accept his son’s death and killed himself.)
  • Julie Woodward, age 17, was on Zoloft when she hung herself in her family’s detached garage.
  • Matthew Miller was 13 when he saw a psychiatrist because he was having difficulty at school. The psychiatrist gave him samples of Zoloft. Seven days later his mother found him dead, hanging by a belt from a laundry hook in his closet.
  • Kurt Danysh, age 18, and on Prozac, killed his father with a shotgun. He is now behind prison bars, and writes letters, trying to warn the world that SSRI drugs can kill.
  • Woody ____, age 37, committed suicide while in his 5th week of taking Zoloft. Shortly before his death, his physician suggested doubling the dose of the drug. He had seen his physician only for insomnia. He had never been depressed, nor did he have any history of any mental illness symptoms.
  • A boy from Houston, age 10, shot and killed his father after his Prozac dosage was increased.
  • Hammad Memon, age 15, shot and killed a fellow middle school student. He had been diagnosed with ADHD and depression and was taking Zoloft and “other drugs for the conditions.”
  • Matti Saari, a 22-year-old culinary student, shot and killed nine students and a teacher, and wounded another student, before killing himself. Saari was taking an SSRI and a benzodiazapine.
  • Steven Kazmierczak, age 27, shot and killed five people and wounded 21 others before killing himself in a Northern Illinois University auditorium. According to his girlfriend, he had recently been taking Prozac, Xanax, and Ambien. Toxicology results showed that he still had trace amounts of Xanax in his system.
  • Finnish gunman Pekka-Eric Auvinen, age 18, had been taking antidepressants before he killed eight people and wounded a dozen more at Jokela High School – then he committed suicide.
  • Asa Coon from Cleveland, age 14, shot and wounded four before taking his own life. Court records show Coon was on Trazodone.
  • Jon Romano, age 16, on medication for depression, fired a shotgun at a teacher in his New York high school.

Missing from list… 3 of 4 known to have taken these same meds…

  • What drugs was Jared Lee Loughner on, age 21…… killed six people and injuring 14 others in Tuscon, Az
  • What drugs was James Eagan Holmes on, age 24….. killed 12 people and injuring 59 others in Aurora Colorado
  • What drugs was Jacob Tyler Roberts on, age 22, killed two injured 1, Clackamas Or
  • What drugs was Adam Peter Lanza on, age 20, Killed 26 and wounded 2 in Newtown Ct

Those focusing on further firearms bans or magazine restrictions are focusing on the wrong issue and asking the wrong questions, either as a deliberate attempt to hide these links or out of complete and utter ignorance.

Don’t let them! Force our elected “representatives” and the biased media to cast a harsh spotlight on the issue of mental illness drugs. Don’t stop hounding them until they do. As the antis say, “even if it saves just one life,” it is worth doing.

More articles, commentary, and information by D. Roberts available at That Every Man Be Armed.com


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sharon

If you pay attention to the “cases” quoted her the majority of the shooters and or suicides are kid 17 and under. I agree there has not been enough testing on these drugs on kids to understand how they work… But I have been on SSRI drugs for many many years as I am manic depressive with anxiety disorder And my doctor has always been good to tell me side effects as does my pharmacist and I look them up myself… These drugs are vital to some of us so we can just function on a daily basis. I know… Read more »

Ric Dutton

OK this isn’t a representative sample of the general population nor a representative sample of people who have used anti psychotics or SSRI’s. It is only a sample of people who were so screwed up that they thought it was OK to take a gun to school or somewhere else and shoot people. It is also only a sample of US citizens, and those with easy access to guns. Also this “study” doesn’t seem to be cited anywhere else. The conclusion shouldn’t be that Guns are good and SSRI’s are bad. The conclusion is that people with mental illnesses should… Read more »

kirsty

Wait, did you guys read the title????
“Nearly Every Mass SHOOTING In The Last 20 Years Shares One Thing In Common, & It’s NOT Weapons”

I believe that SHOOTINGS require weapons. Null point.

Also, as a mental health provider, I can say that this author has an opinion (that he is free to share, of course!), yet has not provided adequately fact-checked material. We all want answers, but it’s never a single blame.

David

Many people are helped by antidepressants. Making a case that all/most of these killings had one thing in common as an indictment of an entire class of proven, helpful drugs is irresponsible. Another thing most of these killings has in common – they are all male killers…therefore should we ban men? Women, please don’t answer that rhetorical question!!

BP

This is what I got out of this article: 1. In order for these kids to be taking the drugs, obviously there is a history/problem with irrational behavior. The drugs are the symptom, perhaps not the cause of these murderer’s problems in every case. The drugs usually aren’t the right answer to the kid’s problems, but sometimes a parent may be at their wit’s end and are uninformed, or be an absent/irresponsible parent and just want a quick fix for their kid’s problem. 2. While I am fervently opposed to gun control, these examples cite fairly young children doing the… Read more »

Delilah Michael

Kip Kinkle’s father called the Doctor’s office on Friday and told them that the new medication he had been put on was causing him to be worse. He was told that the doctor was gone for the weekend, to bring him in on Monday. By Monday both hos parents were dead and he was on a shooting rampage at school. He was convicted and sent to prison. From all accounts, since his meds were changed he has not been a problem in over 14 years. I am told by another prisoner who knows him that he is a really nice… Read more »

Tommy

My wife and I did a tv show 3 years ago presenting the same facts as the above article.The “hate”mail was overwhelming!Why?Two fold.First you are going to be hated by the liberals who want us to believe guns are the problem and want them banned.Part of the “anything but personal responsibility generation”.I guess if we “ban”mattresses we will also stop prostitution.Secondly is the sad fact that you put your finger on what is become the “first love”of America’s masses;”no more pain or sorrow feel good drugs!”This billion dollar industry promises “miracles”in a bottle to all who will step up and… Read more »

John Twomey

There’a definitely an interesting question raised by this article, but like too many of the articles on both sides of the gun debate, it oversimplifies. To say that, because psychotropics may well be a factor, one should simply ignore the role of firearms in these shootings is not a logical train of thought. If people would stop pointing fingers at one another and focus on the issue, something might happen. In contrast to what this article states, advertised side effects of psychotropics include depression, possible psychotic behavior, and so on, and in my opinion they are over-prescribed to a degree… Read more »

Don Hughes

There are 60,000,000 people in the US that have recently taken or are taking psychotropic drugs. Ask not what causes someone to do such violence, but ask what restrains the people that don’t do such violence. This is the key. Tell people why they should not do this type thing. Perhaps many others are acting out their resentment in other ways. Really what all these have in common is uncontrolled anger and resentment.

Raymond Borland

The only way we will know for sure if the serotonin uptake inhibitors are causing people to commit suicide and violent attacks against other people at a higher rate than these people will commit suicide and attack other people because of their underlying mental illness will be to conduct a very large placebo controlled double blind clinical trial in patients with these mental illness and run the studies for an extremely long period of time with an enormous study group. Since the shootings are rare the number of patients involved will be enormous and quite costly. If older tranquilizers and… Read more »

pffan

what about the virginia tech guy? You didn’t list him. According to wikipedia it’s considered one of the deadliest mass shootings by a single gunman world wide.

Not trying to snark or anything. I actually believe you are on to something but omitting one Seung-Hui Cho I felt was a pretty big omission.

Shannon

What needs to be remembered is that if all of these people were prescribed these medications, they were having emotional problems in the first place! They were already unstable, so you can’t make the assumption that they killed because they were on the medications. They may well likely have done it anyways. As a person who is on medications, I feel that I can speak on this issue.

Amanda

First of all, a gun is not capable of killing an individual. A person behind the trigger is. @Havana — if you’re going to subtly point out that guns were the main TOOL used in killing these people, please, also, point out the fact that the sledgehammer is just as capable of doing the killing. Or the butcher knife. I hate it when people like to blame inanimate objects for people’s actions or poor decisions. “Oh, the money made me do it!” “The gun was the reason why I killed that person; not because it was premeditated or anything!” Jeez.… Read more »

grace

Mental health issues, or medication issues. No way of knowing as this is is correlational information at best. I would agree with one implication that you’ve made…………much more attention, resources, awareness and funding for mental health are sorely needed.

just jim

While nearly all of the mass shootings involved these drugs you say, I say all of these shooters breathed air. By your cause&effect analysis wouldn’t that be the real cause?

Jarvik

There is a huge difference between correlation and causation. Is there a correlation between use of therapeutic psychotrophic meds and acts of violence? Perhaps. But, as Bobby Henderson so famously proved, there’s a correlation between the drop in the number of pirates worldwide and the rise in global temperature. As Johnny already stated, correlation does not imply causation. Equating the two is an attempt by a (typically) lazy mind to see a connection that isn’t there. Does it hold up to scientific scrutiny? Absolutely not, but neither do a lot of other things that people believe. No sin there. Where… Read more »

raddle

Dan, have you considered that it is not the SSRI or other drugs that are complicit here, but rather the conditions for which the people are taking the drugs? If not, it is certainly the elephant in the room, and needs attention. Your correlation is exactly that, a correlation, and does not imply causation. Anyone who has taken basic statistics knows that. I am not a “leftie” or anti-gun person, as my Springfield XDM .40 will show, but have you talked to any mental health professionals in writing this articles, or are you just throwing together “facts” as if they… Read more »

Deb

I am very glad I no longer live in the USA. Seems things to have gotten pretty crazy since when I was growing up there during the 60’s and 70’s and played on city streets without fear. Blaming shootings on the medications alone is missing the point. Since most of the mass shootings involve relatively young people, yes, the fact that these drugs do warn that teenagers and children be carefully monitored for suicidal tendencies or unusual behavior while on them is a warning to be heeded. But many people are helped by SSRIs. My life was saved by Prozac,… Read more »

marcia davidowitz

Ritalin is not an SSRI. It is a totally unrelated medication, a stimulant, used to treat Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder.
And maybe what all these people had in common was not the medications they took to treat their psychiatric illness, but rather the illnesses themselves. Clearly, in these cases the medications didn’t help, but it’s quite a leap to say they caused the murders and/or suicides.

ElderDragon

I agree with that MrGoodHands, I think that whenever a household member is prescribed one of these pyschotropic drugs, they should be required to produce a sponsor, someone able to do an investigation into the possibility and ease of access to a firearm. I think that fault for this situation is far broader than we realize, I know that if any member of my household was taking medication for anxiety, extreme depression,or other problem, I would make a special point of making sure that there was no way for them to gain access to any of the guns that I… Read more »

TeeZuk

This shows a correlation between mental illness and mass murder, not a causation between prescription medication and violence. I think we can all agree that someone who attempts mass murder has mental health issues.

Johnny

Correlation does NOT equal causation. Clearly those taking psychoactive drugs need them for some chemical imbalance in the brain. Is it not more likely that the neuropsychological conditions of these people are driving them to commit these heinous acts, as opposed to the medication they take?

MrGoodHands

Ok gun nuts – these drugs are only available by prescription – at least they are only *supposed* to be available by prescription. You want to blame the drugs and not the guns? Suppose we regulate access to the guns the same way we do to the drugs and see what happens to gun violence problems. Deal?

Ashley

I used to take Adderall, Concerta, and strteria for my ADHD growing up. I tried committing suicide to many damn times to count, my senior year of high school I quit taking them altogether. Due to being on the ADHD meds since 4th grade I now have depression but I sure as fuck will not take anymore pills given to me by the government. Oh another thing my mom did have me switched off of Concerta Havanna because I was becoming way to violent and abusive, laughing when things died when it wasn’t even funny. So if you want to… Read more »

Romilly

I woke up on 6 Jan with no voice. Had a previous bout of laryngitis in October 2012, where I wasn’t taken seriously at my Dr until 12 days with no voice, when they did blood tests and gave me antibiotics – recovered completely. What happened to me on 12 January I will never forget and I just have to write this down, to raise awareness of the terrible impact I felt from taking steroids. Awoke on Sunday 6 January with laryngitis again, had absolutely no voice, but felt OK, and able to do chores etc. Monday no better –… Read more »

Loren

Humanbeings are complex beyond the full understanding of anyone on this comment board. We are all damaged. Each of us struggles, in one way or another. Some of our issues come from chemical imbalances and some from negative/traumatic life events. To be honest all of this is a rather large waste of time and energy. That is unless someone here has the instructions on how to create a free wonder drug that will treat every unique patient without any side effects? (Insert adderall joke). Jokes aside, come on people. Let’s take the energy we put into things like this and… Read more »

tenring rob

Having worked as a nurse, many of these medications have side effects as bad if not worse than the initial problem the patient complained of. If you see a psychiatrist, he will prescribe a medication much more often than not. He is more worried about his license and insurance premiums than ill effects these meds have. If he does nothing, he is open for a lawsuit for lack of care. Most patients feel that a pill cures everything. They don’t want to wait for prolonged therapy, they want an instant cure NOW. Most drugs take 7 to 10 days to… Read more »

Grammar nazi

“Signal most” ? lol

jonaston

I am elated to find people asking for (credible) sources. And doubtful they will be produced.

mike Willcutt

It,s not the drug it,s those problems you go through when stop taking cold turky,there’s where the problems start,all narcotics does this ,with draws,halucenations start and danger begin,s or suicidal. It,s thanking hour better and stop taking them,it is a drugs you can’t just stop at once. Slowly lower the dose a little bit at a time .ten years taking haft that time to stop them.controlled withdrawal. God bless those that don’t cold turkey.and God help those who do.

Shannon

All this conclusively indicates is that “nearly all” of these people had symptoms of mental illness, which isn’t surprising. This logic is a little backward. People who are criminally ill & go on medication were ill to start with. Of course they’re going to have that in common. You know what else I bet “nearly all” the offenders had on common? Eating meat and owning jeans. This is pretty irresponsible journalism. I hope the people being helped by medication don’t see this & stop taking their meds without consulting their doctors, because that could *actually* cause a serious & widespread… Read more »

volkystyles

Provocative article. Emotional issues cause us to want to point the finger. Human nature always wants to justify and explain abnormal behavior. Rational thought does to apply to the irrational mind. Perhaps our author is on to something. Particularly if we study
Mass shooting with teens or early twenties on psychotropic meds. Is it the meds or the child rearing?

Lorrain

Obviously a connection here, but I wouldn’t blame the drugs themselves per se. It always comes back to the parents. There are many broken homes with parents more concerned about themselves than their children. Not raising them with morals. Not teaching them right from wrong. And as quick as “Johnny” acts up, rely on drugs for a quick fix. If parents would only build a relationship with their children early on. Teach them love and respect for others, spend time getting to know what their interests are, teaching them to work hard, etc. etc. these horrible events would be very… Read more »

Kate

You’ve stumbled upon a problem related to the general behavior of the SSRI, and it is not a secret. The warning pops up every time you prescribe one. It’s also mentioned in all of the television commercials. This is not as subversive as you think it is. SSRI drugs are noted for slow onset. During the adaptation phase a patient will only notice one change- more energy. The drug will not impact the patient’s feelings of depression for several weeks after beginning treatment. So what you get is a depressed person with loads of newfound energy. This is the reason… Read more »

GW

Fine, so it’s not guns, it’s mental illness. Why aren’t we doing something about it, like Canada does? Well, here’s this same publication arguing against restricting purchasers with mental illness from buying guns. http://www.gunsandammo.com/2005/03/01/mental-illness-and-gun-ownership/ Which way do you want it? BTW- Here’s the law in Canada, which the NRA will fight tooth and nail here- Criminal and Psychiatric Checks According to section 5(1) of the Firearms Act, “[a] person is not eligible to hold a licence if it is desirable, in the interests of the safety of that or any other person, that the person not possess a firearm.”[38] Therefore,… Read more »

Clark

Lowentha, “I just don’t appreciate being lied to”,,,then stop lying to yourself..

brittney

I don’t need facts to believe that these drugs can cause this behavior. when I was 14 I was put on Paxil, after taking them for two months, I tried to kill myself. The withdraws where Hell, I was so sick! Later they stopped prescribing Paxil to teenagers b/c like me a lot of other young people were trying to kill them selves. I’m 28 now, never before or after stopping the Paxil have I attempted to kill myself. I don’t take any thing, I was just having a hard time adjusting to be a teenager, All the hormones. All… Read more »

John Lowenthal

Simple phrase explains why this article is misleading and comes to a false conclusion: Correlation does not imply causation. Simple example that follows the author’s line of logic:

Hey, did you know that scientists found a common factor with all rainstorms over urban areas: UMBRELLAS. Scientists observed that during 95% of rainstorms over urban areas, nearly every person had an umbrella. UMBRELLAS MUST LEAD TO RAIN.

And don’t call me some leftist. I just don’t appreciate being lied to. I gaurantee I own more guns than most people on this site.

TG

The writer forgot to mention one thing. The reason these people are on psychotropic drugs is that they are mentally ill.

Robert

I have seen lists like this with all sorts of claims around them. I have yet to see sources for the “facts” given. I am not calling you a liar, just saying that without any way to verify what you are saying, nobody is going to listen.

Joe

Correlation does not equal causation, people.

Shelly

You need to go back and verify your facts to ensure that you are not playing into the, “Coincidence? I think not,” mentality. Mental health is very under managed, in this country. We need to begin addressing the stigma that is perpetuated by articles, such as this, that create an image of people caring for their brains as if they are to be feared. The brain is another part of the body. It can get sick and may need treatment, but if people are afraid to communicate their concerns or issues with their doctor, they will hide it and then… Read more »

anon

Only one thing to say: Correlation does NOT equal causation.

ClintonR

Love the article Dan, would love to see the sources to back it up.

Scott

Thanks for your thoughtful consideration in regards to this article. I believe what the point being made is that the side effects verses the benefits are not being considered. Therapy is a wonderful tool in helping people work through issues. Suppressing the issues with medication is dangerous. Meaning these Serotonin boosters were designed for short term use to help relieve people in a manic state under constant observation and care of a Dr. That’s not the way they are being distributed. I have friends and acquaintances whom been prescribed these pills years ago and there still on them without observation.… Read more »

Bill

we don’t let blind people drive, we don’t let minors drink, why are we still allowing crazy people access to firearms?

Teddi

My sister sent me the link to this article when she knew that I was considering putting my fourteen year old daughter on antidepressants. Eventho I have never would have considered doing this is the past I started to feel that I might have to. I did some research on line on Prozac and other meds they use for adolescents and all of the studies said the same “study subjects had increased suicdal/homicidal thoughts when on the meds and caused impulsivity…..Not to mention all the other horrible side effects like nausea, diarrhea, heads aches, and the list goes on. I… Read more »

westyguy

How do you get your head so far up your @** DanRoberts and does it hurt?

LG

I definitely understand the outcry of doctors prescribing these medications very easily, especially to teenagers. I can tell you from my own experience that Paxil and now Lexapro for anxiety and can tell you I couldn’t live without them.
Perhaps these drugs have a strikingly different reaction for other people. The question is how do we monitor or prevent it?

Janek

Was the ‘Cherry Boy Killer’ on drugs too?