Idaho Wolf Management Receives Boost from RMEF Grant

Rocky Mountain Elk Foundation
Rocky Mountain Elk Foundation

MISSOULA, Mont.--(Ammoland.com)-Idaho Fish and Game (IDFG) accepted a $50,000 grant from the Rocky Mountain Elk Foundation to assist with its wolf management plan.

The funds will increase IDFG’s knowledge of interactions between wolves and elk, and expand the radio collar program to help managers gain a better understanding of pack and territory size, home range, and other biological traits and actions of the wolf in order to better implement effective management techniques.

“To properly and effectively carry out science-based management practices, it is critical that state agencies recognize and understand predator-prey relationships and wolf populations,” said David Allen, RMEF president and CEO.

“This grant will help IDFG gain a more thorough knowledge of wolves and wolf behavior so it can better implement its approved predator management plan.” “This grant is another example of the outstanding support we’ve received from RMEF and elk hunters for nearly 30 years”, said Brad Compton, IDFG assistant chief of wildlife.

“This grant is particularly important because it comes at a time when federal funding is being incrementally eliminated, thus allowing us to continue to maintain our active wolf monitoring and management program. Idaho’s program is designed to reduce conflict, including addressing unacceptable levels of predation on elk populations.”

In keeping with the North American Model of Wildlife Conservation, RMEF supports state-regulated hunting and trapping as the preferred tools of wolf management. RMEF staunchly supports management to balance and control wolf populations.

“We maintain our longstanding commitment to and support of the goal of state management which is to sustain all wildlife species in balance with the available habitat and the local communities where so many of us live,” added Allen.

RMEF also remains committed to learning more about wolves through research efforts. Since 1989, RMEF invested nearly $664,000 in research grants to advance scientific understanding of wolves, wolf interactions with other species, and overall wolf management. The total includes more than $200,000 in science grants in just the past five years. Most of the contributions paid for independent research by leading universities, state and federal wildlife conservation agencies and tribes.

“A key part of RMEF’s mission is to ensure the future of elk and other wildlife,” said Allen. “This grant helps Idaho managers do that by helping them determine how many wolves are out there, where they travel and what effect they have on elk, deer and other ungulates.”

RMEF previously awarded 2013 grants to Montana and Wyoming to assist with wolf management in those states.

RMEF will allocate nearly $2.9 million for elk and wildlife-related conservation projects in 27 states with wild, free-ranging elk populations in 2013. Additionally $570,000 will also be allocated to hunting heritage programs in 49 states.

About the Rocky Mountain Elk Foundation
RMEF is leading a conservation initiative that has protected or enhanced habitat on more than 6.3 million acres–an area larger than Yellowstone, Grand Canyon, Glacier, Yosemite, Rocky Mountain and Great Smoky Mountains national parks combined. RMEF also is a strong voice for hunters in access, wildlife management and conservation policy issues. RMEF members, partners and volunteers, working together as Team Elk, are making a difference all across elk country. Join us at www.rmef.org or 800-CALL ELK.

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Hunt-n-Fish
Hunt-n-Fish
8 years ago

Valerie, in theory it all sounds nice, but here’s an excerpt from a story in Wisconsin two years ago, when there was no lethal control offered. More than 30 dogs were killed by wolves that year in Wisconsin, including a number of “guard dogs” on one farm: Efforts to scare wolves away from farms are sometimes successful, if the farm is isolated, but often simply end up “pushing them from one farm to another,” Wydeven said. Many of the pet dogs were working farm guard dogs allowed to roam free on rural property, Wydeven noted, and not in developed or… Read more »

Natasha
Natasha
8 years ago

You know Bill Nye “The Science Guy” said it fairly well in one of his episodes. He explained how wolves numbers directly correlate to the number of prey. The more prey, the more wolves. So to truly manage wolf numbers, you would have to go after their prey. And while most Hunters bitch and complain (most of my family hunts and loves wolves) about the lack of hunting due to wolves, they don’t even understand that the deer or elk

Tenring Rob
8 years ago

Nature has a balance, the ecosystem can only support so many animals. If the wolves are not hunted,or trapped they will reproduce and eat elk. The Rocky Mountain Elk Foundation is concerned about Elk. That’s their job. Here in Minnesota, we have an overabundance of wolves. They have established a wolf season to cull the packs of wolves. They are eating an excessive amount of deer and moose. The system needs balance, and they are limiting wolf harvest.

Valerie Goodness
Valerie Goodness
8 years ago

RMEF pays for hunting wolves, not science. How fast wil their donations dry up if Montana’s “Scientists” deem killing wolves, unscientific and not healthy to elk ecosystems? if Montana’s biologists said “wolf hunting stops today”, the RMEF donations would stop immediately. Funny how the wolf kill states get RMEF donations but not states that refuse to kill wolves. I have an idea, how about if the RMEF donates that money to http://www.predatorfriendly.org/about/