The International Small Arms Control Standard:The Next Step of the UN Gun Ban

By Alan Chwick & Joanne Eisen

United Nations Gun Ban
The International Small Arms Control Standard:The Next Step of the UN Gun Ban : Img Groesch Digital Illustrations
AmmoLand Gun News
AmmoLand Gun News

New York –-(Ammoland.com)- It's named the International Small Arms Control Standard (ISACS) and it has been kept secret for years.

It's a child of failure, the failure of decades of attempts to disarm all civilians. Voluntary disarmament didn't work. Forced civilian disarmament didn't work. And black markets burgeoned.

The firearms prohibitionists aggressively began to push for what would be an international legally binding arms treaty, a.k.a. the Arms Trade Treaty (ATT), that would, supposedly, close all of the gaps and loopholes through which arms flowed. The firearms prohibitionists needed a 100% agreement, known as a “consensus,” to pass the ATT.

But, because of the consenus required, the ATT, as passed by the U.N., is not strong enough.

The prohibitionist, also, had been working on their dream laws in a separate document. In this document they dreamed their damnedest, and they wrote and created the ISACS. ISACS is their back-up plan. Eventually, they expect ISACS, to set the rules that will end global civilian small arms possession.

Oh! That van't happen here! Never here in the U.S.! But, imagine a situation where we are completely surrounded globally by ISACS regulations. And, we gunnies are constantly assailed by our own firearms phobic fellow citizens. We are fighting an enemy who has and is planning a decades-long attempt to finally disarm American civilians.

Jeff Moran, who wrote UNITED NATIONS INTER-AGENCY SMALL ARMS CONTROL STANDARDS DEVELOPMENT: A Case Study In Transnational Gun Control & Civil Disarmament Policymaking alerted us to the fact that the part of ISACS which is relevant to us is Part 3.3, which is available online HERE.

This document states that “This document is in draft form. As such, it is not complete, has not been adopted by the United Nations and may not be referred to as an international standard.”

But, you can bet that it will be adopted by the U.N.

Jeff Moran told us in an email, “What is essential to understand is that the ATT can be changed through an ongoing process, and will likely be amended to incorporate the U.N.'s International Small Arms Control Standards. The result is that, within ten years , the ATT will be transformed from its ‘artfully ambiguous' current state to something more clearly contrary to U.S. national interests, in addition to the interests of trade and pro-gun American civil society.”

That's right. Gun phobes were unable to get a strong ATT passed because of the requirement of consensus acceptance. But, according to the ATT's Article 20 #3, the treaty can be amended with only a 75% consensus, easing the way for its proponents to add chunks of ISACS into it. Understand, that ISACS demands that “Laws, regulations and administrative procedures shall be in place at the national level to exercise effective control over the access of civilians to small arms and light weapons.” This is a ‘shall do', not a ‘may do', for those nations who have signed the ATT.

Because the ATT is legally binding, any part of ISACS incorporated into it, will become legally binding on all participating nations and their civilians. Should sufficient nations sign, and the ATT with ISACS 3.3 included becomes the new global norm, we American civilians, even if our Senate does not ratify, become embroiled in a very sticky situation.

As you read the ISACS 3.3, you will see how difficult it will become for the average civilian to own firearms legally. Read it and tell your friends about it. ISACS will control the user of weapons, what kind of weapons they may have and how they may use them.

The authors:

Mr. Alan J. Chwick has been involved with firearms much of his life, and is currently the Managing Coach of the Freeport Junior Club (FJC), at the Freeport NY Revolver & Rifle Association, Freeport, NY.

Dr. Joanne D. Eisen practices dentistry on Long Island, NY. She has collaborated and written on firearm politics for the past 20 years, and is a Senior Fellows at the Independence Institute in Denver, CO.

 

  • One thought on “The International Small Arms Control Standard:The Next Step of the UN Gun Ban

    1. Well, that sounds like a whole lot of awful.

      Basically … it says you can’t do anything firearms-related without permission from the government. It uses the phrase “where/if permitted by domestic law” when referring to using a weapon for self-defense. It wants guns and ammunition stored separately, and guns to be locked up “when not in use” (if one has a gun for self-defense, is it not ALWAYS in use?) …

      If the United States ever attempts to implement this …. it will not go well.

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