AGFC Plans to Remove Palarm Creek Blockage Left Behind by 2014 Tornado

AGFC Plans to Remove Palarm Creek Blockage Left Behind by 2014 Tornado
Tornado Damage
Arkansas Game and Fish Commission
Arkansas Game & Fish Commission

Mayflower -(Ammoland.com)-– The aftermath of the devastating 2014 tornado, which destroyed homes and businesses in Mayflower, left behind dozens of fallen trees and other debris that are restricting flow in Palarm Creek below the Lake Conway dam. Because of the risks associated with leaving the debris in the creek channel, the AGFC plans to start removing the debris as soon as weather permits.

The congestion exists for about one mile downstream of the dam. Palarm Creek is the main tributary that was impounded to create Lake Conway. The creek drains into the Arkansas River a few miles downstream of the Lake Conway dam.

The debris in Palarm Creek slows the flow of water that is discharged from the lake during heavy rains, AGFC District 10 Lake Manager Matt Horton says. “It increases the flood risk to landowners living adjacent to Lake Conway,” Horton explained. “In addition, it backs excess water into the forested area along the creek channel, endangering the integrity of the Bell Slough Green Tree Reservoir water control structure as well as private property,” he added.

The debris in Palarm Creek slows the flow of water that is discharged from the lake during heavy rains, AGFC District 10 Lake Manager Matt Horton says. “It increases the flood risk to landowners living adjacent to Lake Conway,” Horton explained. “In addition, it backs excess water into the forested area along the creek channel, endangering the integrity of the Bell Slough Green Tree Reservoir water control structure as well as private property,” he added.

Heavy equipment is in the area waiting for water to recede enough in the creek for work to begin. “Weather permitting, work will begin within the next week or two and continue until all of the blockages have been removed. During this project, water will be held back in Lake Conway to maximize the efficient use of the heavy equipment,” Horton says.

Lake Conway’s water level is managed in accordance to the AGFC’s Lake Conway Water Level Management Plan, which mandates the water level is maintained one foot below the normal pool elevation of 263.0 MSL from Nov. 15 to March 15 for flood water storage. AGFC district fisheries biologists will not discharge any water from Lake Conway during the project, Horton said. “We will release water only if the water level reaches normal pool or there is an imminent rain event that could pose a flooding risk to adjacent landowners,” he said.
For questions about the project, contact the AGFC District 10 Fisheries office in Mayflower by calling 877-470-3309.