Secularists vs. Suicide Bombers

Suicide Bombers
Secularists vs. Suicide Bombers
Pat Buchanan
Pat Buchanan

USA – -(Ammoland.com)- “What apparently happened was that the Iraqi forces just showed no will to fight. … We can give them training, we can give them equipment; we obviously can't give them the will to fight.”

Thus did Defense Secretary Ash Carter identify the root cause of the rout of the Iraqi army in Ramadi.

Disgusted U.S. military officers say the 1,000 ISIS fighters who overran Ramadi were outnumbered by the defenders 10 to 1.

Why did the Iraqi army run? And what motivated the fighters of ISIS to attack a city whose defenders so vastly outnumbered them?

According to battle reports, the assault began when dozens of captured U.S. armored vehicles and trucks, laden with explosives, were driven by ISIS volunteers to blast huge holes in the defenders' lines.

Why do all the martyrs seem to be on their side? And why is it our side that, all too often, shows “no will to fight”?

Iraqis are not cowards. From 1980 to 1988, their fathers died in the scores of thousands defending their country against Iran. But if Iraqis would die for dictator Saddam Hussein, why does today's Iraqi army seem reluctant to fight for the democratic Haider al-Abadi?

And the story of Iraq is the story of Syria.

Four years into that civil-sectarian war, the al-Qaida Nusra Front has carved out a sector in Idlib, as have the Islamic State terrorists in Raqqa. Bashar Assad's army, though bleeding, is still fighting.

And the Free Syrian Army we backed? Defunct. Some fought, but others defected to the jihadis, fled or sold their weapons.

In Yemen, the Houthi rebels came down from the north to seize Sanaa, drive the president into exile, occupy Aden, and capture huge stockpiles of American weapons. The U.S.-backed army crumbled.

Again, why do these rebels seem willing to fight for what we see as antiquated beliefs, but all too often our friends do not fight?

Perhaps the answer is found in Thomas Babington Macaulay: “And how can man die better than facing fearful odds, for the ashes of his fathers, and the temples of his gods?”

Tribe and faith. Those are the causes for which Middle Eastern men will fight. Sunni and Shiite fundamentalists will die for the faith. Persians and Arabs will fight to defend their lands, as will Kurds and Turks.

But who among the tribes of the Middle East will fight and die for the secular American values of democracy, diversity, pluralism, sexual freedom and marriage equality?

“Expel the Crusaders from our lands!” — there is a cause to die for.

Go back to 1983. A jihadist of the Amal militia drove a bomb-laden truck into the Marine barracks in Beirut. In 2000, two suicide bombers steered a tiny boat up alongside the USS Cole in Aden harbor, stood, saluted and blasted a hole in the hull, almost sinking the warship.

Nineteen young men volunteered to ride those planes into the Pentagon and the Twin Towers on 9/11. The “underwear bomber” and “shoe bomber” were prepared to go down with those planes.

Murderers and would-be murderers all. But according to a new Al-Jazeera poll, the warriors of the Islamic State have many Muslim admirers.

In Afghanistan, we have fought the Taliban for 13 years. Yet still they fight. And many fear the Afghan army we trained and armed at a cost of tens of billions will disintegrate when we go home.

Why do the Taliban seem to have in abundance a will to fight that appears far less present in the Afghan army units we have trained?

These questions are highly relevant. For they are about the ultimate question: Can the West win in the Middle and Near East?

In almost all of the wars in which we have been engaged, those we back have superior training, weapons and numbers. Yet, for whatever makes men willing to fight and die, or volunteer for martyrdom, the Islamic State, al-Qaida, and the Taliban have found the formula, while our allies have not.

To be a martyr for Allah, to create a new caliphate, to expel the infidels and their puppets, these are causes Islamic man will die for. This is what ISIS has on offer. And the offer is finding buyers even in the West.

What do we have on offer? What do we have to persuade Iraqi Sunnis to fight to return their Anbar homeland to the Iranian-backed Shiite regime in Baghdad?

Of our Arab allies, the Qataris, Saudis and Gulf Arabs are willing to do air strikes. And the Kurds will fight — for Kurdistan.

But if the future belongs to those willing to fight and die for it, or to volunteer to become martyrs, the future of the Middle East would seem fated to be decided by Sunni tribesmen, Shiite militia, ISIS and al-Qaida, Hezbollah and the Iranian Revolutionary Guard.

In the Middle East, the time of the True Believers appears at hand.

Patrick J. Buchanan is the author of the new book “The Greatest Comeback: How Richard Nixon Rose From Defeat to Create the New Majority.

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JanekDajjalMichael TravisPeterman from 1954Dave from San Antonio Recent comment authors
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Janek
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Janek

The lesson learned too late. Saddam Hussein, being a product of his environment, knew how to keep all the various factions ‘in line’ by applying force where needed. We should have left him in power. It would have been a real savings in American money and lives!

Dajjal
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Dajjal

Muslims are the enemy. Islam is the doctrine that makes Muslims an existential threat to life, liberty and prosperity. Muslims, no matter what sect, are our sworn enemies, neither friends nor allies. Shrub should have nuked the nations that facilitated 9/11. Invasion without eliminating Islam by destroying their faith rendered the entire effort a waste of blood and treasure. Go to the internet archive, download “The Book Of Jihad”, put pets and children in a safe place, put away all fire, spill and choke hazards, then read it. Search for and download “The Quranic Concept of War”, open it to… Read more »

Dave from San Antonio
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Dave from San Antonio

We try to make war “sterile”. Only the “enemy” die. War is a dirty business…if we want to win…we have to show the enemy that we will “do what it takes” to win. Our military has been hobbled with PC and other crap…all piled on by politicians and ‘bleeding hearts’…I’m not saying to kill civilians wholesale or to cause unnecessary destruction, but to win, in war…the “hobbles” have to be taken off.

Peterman from 1954
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Peterman from 1954

@Dave from San Antonio – I agree completely. I also know we will not do what it takes to win. Modern war is 80% political (read PC) and 20% actual fighting. Vietnam was a good example. We were afraid to try. Afraid of whom we would anger. If we are not in this to win, then we need to get out and quit playing games. If we are going to fight, then fight like we mean it, else come home.

TRUTH BE TOLD
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TRUTH BE TOLD

Who wrote this? Ahhh if we Really Really went to war and I mean REALLY it would not be as you see today… see when we fight we have to only kill the bad guys…. but if ALL were considered bad THEN youd see a real ass kicking.

A pure bomb – gas – toxic fumes whatever …… then it would show how things would be….. ak47’s and men strapped with bombs would all die in whatever city was leveled….. no nation building just pure death….. move on to the next sand pit to be……

Michael Travis
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Michael Travis

And why? Why do you wish to send an underpaid and disinterested US military 15,000 miles away to a country they cannot possibly understand (and no..the ridiculous “human terrain” corps. didn’t work out) and fight another war on behalf of Islam? After all, to those old enough to remember (as Buchanan certainly does) it was the the U.S. that imposed a theocratic Islamic government, with Sharia Law as it’s Constitution, on a formerly secular Iraq. Are we worried that Iraq still has a few Kurds and Christians left (There were over 2 million Christians in Iraq in 1973, and less… Read more »

Michael Travis
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Michael Travis

CORRECTION: ((There were over 2 million Christians in Iraq in 2003, not, as written, “1973”)