First New Technology for Ammunition Cases in Decades; Shell Shock Technologies, LLC.

Single bullet
Single bullet
Shell Shock Technologies, LLC.
Shell Shock Technologies, LLC.

Westport, Conn. (Ammoland.com) – Shell Shock Technologies, LLC. (SST), a start-up technology and manufacturing company focused on developing disruptive case technologies for the ammunition industry, has officially launched their first product; the NAS3 two-piece 9mm Nickel Alloy Shell.

Founded in August 2015, SST is committed to developing industry leading new technologies that combine low-cost with unprecedented performance.

The NAS3 two-piece case consists of a solid nickel-plated aircraft aluminum head and a proprietary enhanced nickel alloy stainless cylinder. The 9mm case is 50% lighter and costs significantly less than conventional brass cases. The weight savings will be even more dramatic for rifle cases. Shell Shock will be releasing additional pistol cases (380 and .45ACP) by year-end and a selection of rifle calibers over the next 12 months, all of which will feature NAS3 technology. All Shell Shock products come with a 24-month price guarantee and are proudly made in the USA!

Casings
Casings

The nickel plated aircraft-grade aluminum head, offers greater lubricity than brass and will not abrade, clog, foul, wear-out or damage breach and ejector mechanisms. SST’s patent pending design also prevents ‘ballooning’ caused by pistols and automatic weapons with an unsupported breach.  The head can be anodized in different colors for branding purposes and easy load identification. Polished Nickel and Black heads are immediately available, additional colors will be introduced later this year.

The proprietary nickel alloy stainless cylinder offers uniform wall thickness and a case capacity that is fractionally larger than a standard 9mm shell. Outside dimensions comply with SAAMI specifications. In addition, the case design incorporates a fractionally larger flash hole which helps eliminate back-face pressure, increases burn efficiency and is ideal for the new generation of environmentally friendly primers.

The combination of materials offers greater corrosion resistance, tensile strength (2x stronger) and elasticity than brass.  NAS3 cases will not split, chip, crack or grow (stretch) and are fully-reloadable with SST’s custom reloading dies. Testers have reported up to 40 reloads. NAS3 cases eject cool to-the-touch and can be picked up with a magnet (great for outdoor ranges).  SST will buy back spent cases from range operators for the same price per pound as brass cases.

NAS3 cases have been successfully tested on a variety of automatic and hand loading machines including Ammo Load, Camdex, Alpha/Bitterroot, Hornady and Dillon Precision.

NAS3 cases are the perfect platform to support lead free and frangible projectiles. Lighter bullets demand +P and +P+ loads to achieve desired energy levels; NAS3 cases have been tested successfully with pressures up to 65k psi.

NAS3 is “Best in Class” for maintaining consistent velocity between rounds. In an independent test performed by H.P. White Laboratory (a major munitions testing facility), rounds fired using NAS3 cases achieved a velocity standard deviation of 0.093 FPS (124 grain FMJ bullet, 4.2 grains Titegroup powder, 10 rounds, extreme variation 3fps). Unbeatable performance!

NAS3 Two-Piece Shell Technology
NAS3 Two-Piece Shell Technology

Cost is king and NAS3 cases are priced lower than brass and beat brass on every performance metric. NAS3 cases contain no ‘red metal’ based raw materials.  Unlike brass, unstable and unpredictable swings in copper prices do not effect NAS3 pricing. In addition, NAS3 cases are drawn not extruded, drawing is a cheaper, faster and a more accurate production process.

In sum, NAS3 wins on Price, Process and Performance and most importantly gives ammunition manufacturers a way to get out of their reliance on brass.

NAS3 is hosting an introductory shooting event on Thursday, May 5, 2016 at the Centennial Gun Club, Centennial, Colorado from 10AM – 2PM. Please call 203-246-3457 to receive an invitation.

Loaded 9mm ammunition (using NAS3 technology) can be purchased from Shell Shock’s customers listed on Shell Shock’s Website. Unloaded cases and reloading dies can be purchased directly from www.shellshocktech.com.

About Shell Shock Technologies, LLC:

Founded in Westport, Connecticut in 2015, SST is a start-up technology and manufacturing company focused on developing disruptive case technologies for the ammunition industry. SST is a component manufacturer suppling shell cases to the shooting sports market as well as to U.S. and foreign ammunition manufacturers, law enforcement, military and other government agencies.

www.shellshocktech.com

92 thoughts on “First New Technology for Ammunition Cases in Decades; Shell Shock Technologies, LLC.

  1. Let me know when you make rifle rounds like this. Specifically in 223 and 308. Would love to try’em in my Mossberg MVP and Rem 700. I just don’t shoot enough pistol rounds to justify buying a new setup (dies). Your pricing seems good and every thing you posted sounds great I just can’t justify it for the 1k to 2k rounds a year of pistol I shoot (hell I should just sell my pistols I really don’t shoot them). I how ever shoot a lot of rifle rounds (in the realm of 20k/year for the MVP in 223 alone).

  2. I purchased 200 rounds, and went through 100 before I gave up on them. Of the 100 rounds I had 17 primer strike failures. I ran them through my full size sig 250 which has never disappointed me. This ammunition is horrible. I gave a friend a box, and I’ll film my experiences with the last 50 to send back to the manufacturer. Don’t buy this crap!

    1. Joel, we’re sorry to hear about the problems with the ammunition you purchased. While Shell Shock Technologies does not manufacture loaded ammunition (Shell Shock simply supplies cases to ammunition manufacturers who insert the primer, powder and projectiles), we care deeply about customers’ experiences using products that feature our cases. We have already been in contact with the manufacturer that loaded those rounds and have arranged for them to send you some replacement ammunition free of charge. If possible, we’d also like to arrange to send the problem rounds back to the ammunition manufacturer (using a prepaid shipping label, you won’t have to pay the shipping costs) so that we can work with them to resolve this issue and ensure it does not happen again.

      Thanks,

      Shell Shock Technologies
      http://www.shellshocktech.com
      [email protected]

      1. I would love to test your casings with my own loading equipment I have loaded tens of thousands of 9 MM rounds over the last 45 years. I’ll almost be willing to bet I don’t have a single misfire in a hundred rounds.

  3. I had a chance to see this ammo in action this weekend. Functioned perfectly. Held it in my hands, the weight savings over convential brass cases is nothing short of amazing. If these casings can be produced and sold at a reasonable price point this will be a huge hit.

  4. “cases eject cool to-the-touch”
    One of the problems caseless ammunition faces is the brass case acts as a heat sink, helping to remove heat from the gun to slow down overheating. These cases don’t act as a heat sink so that heat will stay in the gun promoting overheating (potentially shorting barrel life). It will be interesting to see if anyone does test whether or not these rounds have any notable effect on barrel life in rapid fire.

    1. It appears that you’re referring to rifle ammunition in this matter and if so how would this theory work in regards to gas piston ejection systems were all the gas is ejected up to the front of the rifle verses being left in the chamber?

      1. In any firearm most of the gas follows the bullet out of the barrel.
        Any time a round is shot through a firearm a lot of heat is produced. That heat has to go some were. With a brass case some of the heat is carried out of the firearm by the case. These cases are ejected cool to-the-touch so I’m guessing that means the firearm will get hotter faster, possibility contributing to premature wear on the barrel and cook offs. Both of those things will most likely only concern people doing a lot of rapid fire or full auto shooting. :p But I would be interested to know how much different the heat build up is between using these cases and normal brass cases. And if that has any measurable effect on barrel or spring life.

        If these cases turn out to be substantially less expensive than standard brass cases perhaps it would be a good way to manufacture odd cases like .460 Rowland or .45 win mag. (After they start making .45 acp they would just have to put a longer tube on the case head for those, assuming the case head is strong enough for those pressures.)

        1. And there are a lot of folks who AREN’T veterans who spend many of our sunny days at the range and all of the rainy ones at the reloading bench.

          BTW … does anyone have a recipe for 1200-R / 75 gn projectile? Alliant and Hornady are both silent on the matter … a fact I didn’t discover until after I had bought 5# of it.

        2. Since the heat is generated inside the case, for it to eject cool requires only that the metals used transfer heat more slowly than a brass case.

          I’m thinking that, rather than acting as a heat sink, brass cases serve to transfer heat TO the chamber, not away from it.

          1. I’ve never noticed anyone mention steel or aluminum cases ejecting cool to-the-touch. I wonder if they have any measurable effect on heat transfer?

            Perhaps I’ll roundup some of each case material to test when the SST ammo become readily available.

  5. Here is the reply I got from an email I sent them. (Note: rounds from American Bullet are priced at just over 32 cents each which is more than American Eagle or Winchester 115gr 9mm Ruger)

    We are working on it. Maybe as early as next week.
    Shell Shock does not load ammunition. Loaded ammunition is currently available from American Bullet http://www.americanbullet.com
    I am not sure it is posted yet on their website yet, but you can contact Kim Baliman, Director of Sales at American Bullet directly who is cc’d on this email. Kim please reach out to JC at your earliest convenience. Kim’s telephone number is 308-235-2500 Ext. 201
    American Bullet’s ammunition is featured in a very informative article about our NAS3 technology http://www.americas1stfreedom.org/articles/2016/5/8/first-gear-ammunition-these-arent-your-daddys-cartridges/ Copy attached.

    Cases and reloading dies will be available in mid-June. Filling OEM orders has absorbed most of our initial inventory and we are in the middle of scaling up production of our die sets. We need to have die sets available to properly service the reloading community. We will let you know as soon as they are ready. We have not finalized pricing but NAS3 cases will be priced significantly below new brass cases. We apologize for this inconvenience.

    General Die Information.
    There are two dies required to reload the NAS3 cases, a resizing die and a flaring die. NAS3 cases are manufactured in 2-parts which are held together by a high pressure compression joint. Conventional reloading dies can put undue stress on this joint. This is caused by the way cases are pulled by the head out of the resizing die. The pulling process can compromise the joint. To address this issue, Shell Shock designed a sizing die that incorporates a spring mechanism that pushes the case out of the die without damaging the case. A similar design is incorporated into the flaring die. This reloading technique puts no stress on the compression joint and does not damage the rim of the case. Shell Shock’s die sets will be available in early June and will be priced in line with other die sets available on the market. Shell Shock’s dies will work on most loading presses including Hornady, Lee and Dillon machinery. We will be posting a demonstration video of the reloading process.
    New NAS3 cases do not require sizing or flaring (less stations/operations on the loading machine), they are delivered sized and flared and ready for primer, powder drop, bullet drop and crimp.

    All the best and thank you again for your interest in Shell Shock.
    Best regards
    Shell Shock Technologies

    1. I anxiously await your new technology in all of the NATO size caliber rounds and reloading dies. By all means consider me as one of your field test marketing engineers when these rounds first start hitting the market as well as the reloading equipment.

  6. Being engineer minded I am just curious as to how the two pieces are connected together?? Also never have heard the term “disruptive case technology”

  7. Save your conventional brass, you’ll need it when ammo of any kind is not available. Buy what components you need now. It’s good insurance for the future. Even if ammo is still available in the future you’ll be ahead of price inflation. Look what’s happened to the price of .22 rim fire ammo the last few years. Try finding a ‘brick’ of .22 LR for less than $20.00.

    1. I know virtually nothing about re-loading, but I would think having lots of components available if they are no longer available is a good idea. If there is a total collapse of society, being able to re-load should be a great profession. Added to that I would say having bows, knives, and muzzle loaders will be important too! Learn how to make black powder and shape .50 caliber bullets. By the way, has anyone else noticed the photograph at the beginning of the article is a single round, not a bullet!

      1. Actually the proper terminology is cartridge. But if you look under the definition, synonyms include bullet and round.

        1. Hi there,
          It has been common to interchange the words, but Oxford has yet to change their definition. Since we are lucky enough to have an organization that remains the guardian of the English language, I must defer to their final judgement. There are many languages that are totally out of control… such as Portuguese.

        2. I forgot to mention that cartridge is a better word for our purposes than round. It is the first listed, which means it is the preferred word. Round could be confusing because its first meaning can mean a series of discharges. You were correct.

          1. Hi there,
            I did not know that, not being a Marine, but that is the word I used also. The English language is the most modern language with the most nouns. That is why most Scientific journals, reference manuals, and respected textbooks are either first printed in English, or at least translated and printed in English. Words are commonly misappropriated because few people consult the Oxford before publishing, or speaking! From an academic standpoint, I was wrong, and so are the Marines, but in the end, it is correct communication that is important. My first firearm instructor was a Marine and during one of his lectures he used the word bullet when referring to the cartridge… he immediately corrected himself and called it a round. Think about this: bullet, cartridge, round. Without going into the roots of each word we can see how in some instances the misuse might cause confusion. Bullet, Casing, and propellant makes a Cartridge, then you shoot a Round of six Cartridges.
            I have a question: how is the word Salvo used? Is it only for munitions above .50 caliber?

          2. There’s a reason marines are called JARHEADs! And the Marine Corps is not the final authority on military or civilian terminology.
            De Oppresso liber

          3. Gregory Romeu, I agree. Back in the fifties at Camp Matthews, when you heard “fire one round,” I assure you it did not mean squeeze the trigger eight times or empty the clip, if you will. It meant shoot once. Before that, users of the ’03 Springfield knew intuitively what one round meant because the chamber also was the magazine. A couple of years ago, when I last qualified for my license to carry, the instructor said “load three rounds” before our three-shot qualification step. And “load one round” for that step and so on. Thus, the term has not become obsolete. I’m thinking the leftist clamor to control the universe has misused the terms so radically, Oxford, Webster, et al., cannot keep up. I’m sticking with round as my Marines use it.

          4. Greg, a thousand pardons. When I said the .03 chamber also was the magazine, I immediately wished I could take it back. I was thinking about single shot bolt actions in lieu of the .03 bolt action stripper clip. I wish we could edit our comments but this will have to do. My error wasn’t germane to this subject anyway. Losing one’s lucidity isn’t the worst thing lost to old age.

  8. What about the longer term electrolysis between the different metals, aluminum and steel? Will this effect storage?

    1. Great question! And yes. No coating will last long enough to prevent it.
      I don’t care what the manufacturer says. Even FSA (Flame Sprayed Aluminum) has problems.

  9. Towards the end of WW2, the Germans produced steel cased rounds that looked just like these. I used to have some of them in 9mm.

  10. Their website contains exactly the same text as the article/advertisement above. There are no lists of loaded ammo vendors. There is no information on the cost or availability of unloaded cases. There is no information regarding the cost or availability of the special dies or what makes them special and different from standard reloading dies.

    1. The company just started up. Give them time to flourish. They’re just informing you of the new technology that is coming out.

  11. Given time the website will be updated and all information we need will be in the media as well as the list of manufacturers of ammunition that will be telling us where to find and purchase the ammo. I’m willing to bet we will be buying these cartridges at Walmart within a year Aetna d-mo will be cheaper and better quality.

    I can also predict that all the naysayers will still be the very same in attituf and outlook no matter what!

  12. I remember hearing about and reading all the negativity when the microwave oven was first developed as well as the 8-track tape player and then cassettes.

  13. “Author: Mike McAllister
    Comment:
    Neat idea, waiting for other cals to come out.”

    STILL CAN’T GET YOU EMAIL VERIFY TO WORK CORRECTLY CAN YOU!!!!!!!!!!!!!

    Mike you have to hit the button twice.

  14. Neat idea, waiting for other cals to come out.

    STILL CAN’T GET YOU EMAIL VERIFY TO WORK CORRECTLY CAN YOU!!!!!!!!!!!!!

  15. It says to check their website for a vendor. There are no vendors listed. They say it is “cheaper” yet there are no prices listed.
    Where are the real facts?
    If the “price” is as claimed I will buy 1000 rounds to test them out.

    The fact they are from Connecticut gives me pause.

    1. Right now the company is manufacturing these components for the ammunition manufacturing companies and vendors to the public will not come along until after the ammunition manufacturing companies are first supplied and this product starts saturating the market.

  16. Well, we’ll see. The proof is in the pudding. I treat advertisement like I do democrats, they are generally not telling the truth.

  17. If you can pick these shell casings up with a magnet, what does magnetism ( over a period of time ) do to your barrel and accuracy ?

  18. Sounds pretty cutting-edge to me…time will tell if it takes off. But, as a general rule…”If you build a better mouse trap, the world will beat a path to your door.”

    I have several Anderson Rifles RF-85 AR’s that require NO OIL to operate exceptionally. I’ve had several “old school” firearms instructors opine, “Why wouldn’t you want to put oil inside your AR?!?” I don’t know…same reason you don’t need to put wings on a rocket? You just don’t need it? What a novel concept… :O

    Geez…why don’t we still put a hand crank handle starter out of the front of our cars like they did 100 years ago? Maybe because we have progressed? Perish the thought!!

    The naysayers above must be the offspring of the Glock-haters-forever crowd, circa 1985, when “a plastic gun can’t ever be better than ‘Old Slabsides'”, the venerable 1911 .45ACP. Look at what the overwhelmingly vast majority of police officers carry on-duty now…’polymer-framed handguns”. Egad!!

    “Lead, follow, or get the h*ll out of the way!!”

    1. Careful with all your ASSumptions there… I am a Glock not-liker, but ONLY because they neither fit MY hand nor point naturaly for ME.

      I’ll take a look at anything that seems promising.

      1. “ASSumptions” work both ways, Grasshopper.

        “ASS” I don’t see “Tionico” either before or after my comment above, it couldn’t have referenced you to begin with…unless you’ve changed your nom de guerre on this comment board. However, the comment about “Glock-haters-forever” was obviously tongue-in-cheek and made reference to those who had a problem with “polymer-framed” pistols way back in the mid-80’s.

        There are precious few absolutes in life…in reference to my original comment about “Glock-haters”, but as always…”If the shoe fits, wear it.” If it don’t, put it back on the shelf and keep looking.

    1. Read the article again. Carefully, take notes if you need to.

      This company only makes the CASINGS, they then sell them to ammo companies to use in their products.

      Here, I’ll help.

      *** Loaded 9mm ammunition (using NAS3 technology) can be purchased from Shell Shock’s customers listed on Shell Shock’s Website. Unloaded cases and reloading dies can be purchased directly from http://www.shellshocktech.com. ***

      1. And apparently YOU did not go to the website and look around, I did and clicked on every link and did not find any “Customers listed”.

  19. Special dies, no thank for riffle but maybe a few pistol rounds and then the price point would have to be very good.

    1) If I could reload 40 over the 6 to 8 times I go on pistol rounds, hmmm so 5 to 6 times longer than I get for brass.
    2) The case would have to be very consistent,
    And
    3) If dies are low cost maybe. They can’t price them much over a lee die set.
    There is a lot of maybes

    1. Cam says: I agree with you about the cost. I am still dubious about the bi-metal case separating in the chamber.

    2. After 45 plus years reloading this sounds great to me. 40 reloads from one casing wow! I hope the dies are reasonable in price.

  20. The combination of materials offers greater corrosion resistance, tensile strength (2x stronger) and elasticity than brass. NAS3 cases will not split, chip, crack or grow (stretch) and are fully-reloadable with SST’s custom reloading dies. Testers have reported up to 40 reloads.

    Ideas like the above can only be conceived of and achieved in a “freedom to think and profit by one’s efforts” kind of environment. This is just one of many examples of why America must not fall to socialism.

    1. We have over 22 million veterans in this country and most of us are geared up. We’ve got your back, go ahead and make the ammo.

      1. Story undoubtedly began life as a press release … and ended up here is pretty much original condition.

        Else, where is the range report?

      2. And there are a lot of folks who AREN’T veterans who spend many of our sunny days at the range and all of the rainy ones at the reloading bench.

        BTW … does anyone have a recipe for 1200-R / 75 gn projectile? Alliant and Hornady are both silent on the matter … a fact I didn’t discover until after I had bought 5# of it.

    1. You need to reread the article closely. Shear Shock is manufacturing these components for the ammunition manufacturing companies to utilize in the manufacture of ammunition in place of brass shells.

      The public in general will not get ahold of these until after they buy already manufactured ammunition utilizing this technology.

  21. If it can be picked up with a magnet many indoor ranges wont allow it. Check your range before you buy!

    1. Correct. My range takes a magnet to my ammo before I can go on the line. It is strange that they are more concerned with the cases rather than the bullets.

      1. Considering that I never use public ranges, what is the reason they use a magnet? Do they not want steel cases or steel projectiles (bullets)?

        1. A lot of public ranges sale the brass case that customers leave behind to reman as extra income. The will give some BS about metal bullets but it is just so they don’t have to sort steel case from brass case.

    1. According to the article, and the company website, they are reloadable, just have to get the special dies from SST.

    2. Not Reloadable ? Article says up to 40 times and can be picked up using a magnet, so 400 series stainless?

      1. But reading and thinking is hard. It’s easier to just ignore everything and complain about what you assume. It’s one of the many reasons this country, indeed the world, is sinking into the mud.

        Based on this article which reads more like an advertisement or company sales brochure, these things are the “wave of the future” invention for the industry. Either this is all bogus, or these will be the only casings in use from now on.

        Time will tell.

      2. Lets just hope that barry wyner doesn’t own a gun. If he’s not smart enough to read an article, he’s not smart enough to understand gun safety!

    3. Quote from the article: “The combination of materials offers greater corrosion resistance, tensile strength (2x stronger) and elasticity than brass. NAS3 cases will not split, chip, crack or grow (stretch) and are fully-reloadable with SST’s custom reloading dies. Testers have reported up to 40 reloads. NAS3 cases eject cool to-the-touch and can be picked up with a magnet (great for outdoor ranges). SST will buy back spent cases from range operators for the same price per pound as brass cases.” Wanna borrow my bifocals??!!

    4. Quote “Testers have reported up to 40 reloads. ” On the other hand you have a point, I’ve lost count of how many times I’ve reloaded 9mm brass casings

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