California Ivory Ban Now in Effect

Ivory Ban
Ivory Ban
California Department of Fish and Wildlife
California Department of Fish and Wildlife

San Francisco, CA -(Ammoland.com)- Signed by Governor Edmund G. Brown Jr. last October, a new law banning the sale of nearly all ivory in the state of California is effective as of July 1, 2016.

The ban, which can be found in California Fish and Game Code, section 2022, encompasses teeth and tusks of elephant, hippopotamus, mammoth, mastodon, walrus, warthog, whale and narwhal, as well as rhinoceros horn, regardless of whether it is raw, worked or powdered, or from a store or a private collection. Under the law, advertising the sale of any items containing ivory is also strictly prohibited.

“The California Department of Fish and Wildlife (CDFW) continues its active role with our federal partners to end wildlife trafficking, which poses a critical threat to conservation throughout the world,” said David Bess, Chief of CDFW’s Law Enforcement Division. “This law provides another tool to aid in this effort.”

Under the new law, raw ivory and most crafted items that include ivory may no longer be purchased, sold or possessed with the intent to sell, with limited exceptions, including the following:

  • Ivory or rhino horn that is part of a bona fide antique (with historical documentation showing the antique is at least 100 years old) provided the item is less than 5 percent ivory or rhino horn by volume;
  • Ivory or rhino horn that is part of a musical instrument (with documentation of pre-1975 construction) provided the instrument contains less than 20 percent ivory or rhino horn by volume; and
  • Activities expressly authorized by federal law, or federal exemptions or permits.

California has a long history in the legal and illegal trafficking market of ivory within the United States. Although the sale of ivory and elephant parts has been illegal in California since 1977, the new law closed a loophole that allowed the continued sale of ivory that was imported into the state before 1977.

The sale of ivory, rhino horn or products that contain ivory will be a misdemeanor, punishable by fines up to $50,000 and one year of incarceration.

About The California Department of Fish and Wildlife’s (CDFW):

The Mission of the Department of Fish and Wildlife is to manage California’s diverse fish, wildlife, and plant resources, and the habitats upon which they depend, for their ecological values and for their use and enjoyment by the public.

For more information, visit: www.wildlife.ca.gov.

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Randy
Randy
4 years ago

I guessing that the citizens of calf. Must be just plan stupid for voting these pr*ck politicians into office ? Or the voters just do not care and prefer to be sheep to the slaughter ! Why are the voters allowing this governor to by-pass all the procedures of Calf. Law??? Seems they threw Brown out of office once, Why not get rid of him a second and Final Time ??? Since California wants to ban semi auto and fully automatic weapons then legally this would include all branches of the military as well ? Also their has been No… Read more »

Colonialgirl
Colonialgirl
5 years ago

IF the IDIOTS of the world HAD NOT burned FIVE TONS of Illegal Ivory and HAD offered it on the open market, the profit from ILLEGAL hunting of Elephants, Rhinos and other animals would have ended for a long time; BUT NOOOOO they had to burn it and run the PRICE of Ivory UP.
Can you say STUPID on STEROIDS ?

Tionico
Tionico
5 years ago

This leaves the Stupid State wide open to court action. The first time someone gets busted for possession of a banned item that he COULD own/possess in, say, Nevada or Oregon, a 14th Ammendment suit is likely. Further, if anyone is caught “illegally” transporting such an item into, out of, or through that sorry state, an ICC violation will ensue.

Stupid nanny state. One wonders how long this mad slide down the cilff wlll continue before there IS a revolt.

Pete
Pete
5 years ago

I wasn’t aware that there were still mammoths or mastodons around. Their ivory is thousands of years old, much older than California. Did CA miss listing Sabre Tooth Tiger teeth, or did I just miss it in the list? Or are they just anticipating the future success of cloning to bring these animals back? It is a fact that elephant numbers are increasing in the African countries that allow elephant hunting while decreasing in those countries that prohibit it. You can look it up. As Always, money is the answer. A permit to hunt an elephant costs thousands of dollars,… Read more »

Junk Bin
Junk Bin
5 years ago

it will be confiscated and go to the clinton foundation for disposal at a later date. Sme will be held for destruction in Hollywood homes

DH in CO
DH in CO
5 years ago

So, restricting the sale of items that are 40 years old and essentially punishing their owners will stem the illegal sale of new ones and protect today’s animals. Interesting theory.

Jim in Conroe
Jim in Conroe
5 years ago

““The California Department of Fish and Wildlife (CDFW) continues its active role with our federal partners to end wildlife trafficking, which poses a critical threat to conservation throughout the world,” said David Bess, Chief of CDFW’s Law Enforcement Division. “This law provides another tool to aid in this effort.”

Mammoth and mastadon tusks? Didn’t realize people were trafficking in mammoths and mastadons.