NRA President Allan Cors reflects on the M1 Garand

Note: This article was originally posted on NRA Blog: https://www.nrablog.com/articles/2016/12/nra-president-allan-cors-reflects-on-the-m1-garand/

NRAblog.com
NRAblog.com

USA -(Ammoland.com)- National Rifle Association President Allan Cors is, of course, no stranger to firearms. Throughout his career, first as an attorney and later his work at various echelons of leadership within the NRA, he’s worked tirelessly to protect the Second Amendment and support the shooting sports culture in the United States, culminating in his election as the 63rd President of the organization.

Outside his efforts to serve American gun owners, Cors himself found incredible interest and passion in shooting and collecting, amassing a storied collection of firearms over the years and routinely participating in service rifle competitions.

(Photo courtesy/NRA Publications)

Having begun collecting at age 18, Cors fondly remembers when he first came into possession of one of the most iconic rifles ever produced, kindling a love for the rifle that has lasted a lifetime – the M1 Garand.

Cors recalls receiving his first M1 Garand from a friend in 1959 who had just purchased a dozen “British-proofed” M1s from Alexandria, Virginia-based firearms importer InterArms. The Garands were in immaculate condition, having been unissued stock from the British Army that wound up returning to the U.S. as surplus.

“I still have that rifle today,” Cors said. “It’s a key part of the collection.”

While his collection grew well outside M1 Garands, the legendary service rifle was more than simply a collectible – it rekindled a love for competitive shooting. Cors had been a competitive shooter in high school and college, but shot only smallbore.

“I knew how to shoot the M1 Garand, but wanted to learn how to shoot it well,” he recalled.

President Cors during his early competitive shooting years. (Photo courtesy/NRA Publications)

In 1966, Cors had been working nearly non-stop with the Judiciary Committee on Capitol Hill, often logging six days a week. Needing a respite and encouraged by his wife Darleen, he joined the Virginia State Highpower Rifle Team, training under Clint Fowler and improving enough to earn Distinguished Rifleman honors within two years shooting the M1 rifle.

Cors competed with the M1 rifle routinely until 1969, when the club received M14 rifles. Eventually, he moved on to shoot the AR-15 competitively, but his love for the M1 Garand wouldn’t fade just because it had been replaced in his competition arsenal.

He continued to build his collection of firearms, eventually purchasing what would become his favorite rifle – and for good reason. In a collection as large and well-appointed as his, that’s no small feat.

(Photo courtesy/NRA Museums)

Cors is the owner of a Springfield Armory M1 rifle with the serial number 1,000,000. This rifle, which was came complete with a walnut-fitted case, silver-plated clip and gold-plated cartridges, was originally presented to its designer John Garand as a retirement gift in in 1953, the only reward he received for his incredible contribution to the Allied victory in the Second World War.

Upon his passing, Garand’s family offered the rifle for sale. As the M1 was one of his passions and realizing the extraordinary historic significance of this particular gun, Cors made an offer on the M1. They accepted.

“I felt very good that they trusted me to do the right thing. Let’s face it: we are only temporary custodians of these things,” Cors said. “They are here in our hands for a while, and then they are passed on to the next generation.”

(Photo courtesy/NRA Museums)

Beyond Garand’s No. 1,000,000, another favorite of his is a shop-made Garand copy produced by the Japanese Navy, a like-new rifle never used in battle that accompanied an American service member returning from the theater.

Both these beloved pieces of Cors' collection are currently on long-term loan to the NRA Museums for visitors to enjoy in the exhibits.

Many historians argue that the U.S. was propelled to victory in World War II in large part, because U.S. infantrymen were armed with the M1 Garand. General George S. Patton, Jr., the legendary commander of the Third Army and renowned leader of men, famously called the M1 “the greatest battle implement ever devised.”

To that point, the NRA President agrees, having finely studied the various models, manufacturers, and nuances of the historic rifle, building a collection within a collection in homage to one of the finest military arms ever produced not only in the U.S., but in the world.

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Arch Stanton
Arch Stanton
3 years ago

I have 10 M1 Garand’s, all purchased from the CMP and personally picked out. The very first one I purchased at the Camp Perry store in 2007. it is a June 1943 serial number with a June 1943 barrel, still in great condition. I have since, slowly returned it to it’s war-time appearance with as correct parts as I could find. I have a Dec 1941 Winchester rifle, which I am slowly doing the same with. I enjoy the M1 rifle, it’s report, cycling, power, robustness, accuracy, feel, handling, balance….it’s a solid performer. You could also bust an enemy’s head… Read more »

Wild Bill
Wild Bill
3 years ago
Reply to  Arch Stanton

@Arch Stanton, Sounds good, bad, and ugly all at the same time!

Pete
Pete
3 years ago
Reply to  Arch Stanton

The problem with finding all 1943 parts for your gun is you’re frustrating its his history. During war time there was an armorer (probably more than one) behind the front lines whose purpose was to repair guns and get them back on the line. He sat there with stacks of parts and, when a gun came in, he’d determine what was wrong; grab a part from a pile; and remove and replace the non-functioning part(s). He didn’t check the name of the manufacturer. So unless a gun was never issued– unlikely for a 1943 M1– it would have parts by… Read more »

Arch Stanton
Arch Stanton
3 years ago
Reply to  Arch Stanton

To those who may sqwak at my putting all SA parts on my 1943 rifle, I am well aware of what field amourers did during the war and also the “cleaning” parties of recruits, etc. It was a CMP Service grade rifle when I bought it from the CMP….the stock sucked and didn’t fit well, so I was going to replace that anyway. It has a real nice original ’43 barrel and I decided I wanted all SA parts on it. It’s my rifle, I will do as I please. Same with the Dec 1941 Winchester rifle. A decent Winchester… Read more »

Pete
Pete
3 years ago
Reply to  Arch Stanton

My but we’re thin-skinned! You can do anything you want with “YOUR” gun. As a purist, I wouldn’t do it.
But to some extent it’s already been done by CMP, so enjoy.

Westerner
Westerner
3 years ago

I’ve always and still do enjoy shooting the m-1 and personally think it takes a lot of the kick out the 30-06 .i joined a club and completed the requirements to order my own from DCM and still have it. They are great rifles and every Serious shooter should have one

hijinx60
hijinx60
3 years ago

South Korea offered to return several thousand that they held in a warehouse that were given to them in WWII by the USA. Obama refused the offer. I hope Trump will allow their return. I’ve always wanted one, but can’t afford one.

jeff millstein
jeff millstein
3 years ago

Yeah, I remember my M-1 which I qualified with in the Marine Corps in the late 50’s. If you pay close attention to Saving Private Ryan you’ll see one actor with a black and blue thumbnail.

Wild Bill
Wild Bill
3 years ago
Reply to  jeff millstein

, Yep, M-1 Thumb. I was cleaning one of mine once while watching TV. Boy Howdy that was a stupid thing to do!

Pete
Pete
3 years ago
Reply to  jeff millstein

To give you an idea of how strong that spring is, a friend and I bought Blue Sky Garands many years ago. He complained that, while his fired, it for some reason mangled the cases. A gunsmith checked it out and informed him the barrel was chambered for 7.62X51 (aka, .308).

ARMY ELint Spook
ARMY ELint Spook
3 years ago

The ARMY initially introduced & trained me using the M1 Garand in late summer of 1961, I shot Expert at basic training ‘record range’ using the M1, what a beautiful & accurate shooting platform. Uncle Sam soon & sadly took away my beloved Garand and replaced her with the M-14. It was then a promise was made, I would one day own a M1 Garand and was finally successful in finding & securing my treasured ‘unicorn’, complete with all accessories, at a private auction & disposal of a fine firearms collection in the summer of 2016. Careful cleaning & inspection… Read more »

Pete
Pete
3 years ago

For the Carbine, don’t you mean “Inland”?

Lloyd Dumas
Lloyd Dumas
3 years ago

You lucky son of great guns !!

JorgeNorberto Pedace
JorgeNorberto Pedace
3 years ago

MARAVILLOSO EL GARAND M1 CALIBRE 30.06,UN ARMA QUE CAMBIÓ LA BALANZA DE PODER EN LA SEGUNDA GUERRA MUNDIAL,EN EL CALIBRE QUE PARA ESTE HUMILDE OPINANTE FUE UNO DE LOS
LOGROS MÁS GRANDE EN LA HISTORIA DE LOS CALIBRES PARA ARMAS DE FUEGO.

Simon
Simon
3 years ago

I’ve got one if you’re interested.

dj
dj
3 years ago

Well, how about obliterating the “sporting purposes” import restrictions of 1968, lifting the import ban of 1989 by daddy bush, gutting and field dressing the NFA and reimporting those thousands of Garand rifles in warehouses offshore just waiting TO COME HOME?

Wild Bill
Wild Bill
3 years ago
Reply to  dj

@dj, How about just obliterating the GCA of 1968 and really lowering the cost on the Garand by competition.

Gene Ralno
Gene Ralno
3 years ago
Reply to  dj

Hear, hear! I was always issued an M1 at every station and always wanted to own one even though when armed I usually carried a 1911. By the time I was able to afford them, they were too expensive. I’ve been waiting for importation, primarily from South Korea to drive the price down. I’m now considering a replica since it will be left to my daughter.

Lloyd Dumas
Lloyd Dumas
3 years ago

I would love to have one but just can’t afford one. The .06 round will harvest anything in North America and beyond. No one will disagree with Gen. Patton about the rifle either, truly a masterpiece.

Wild Bill
Wild Bill
3 years ago
Reply to  Lloyd Dumas

@Lloyd D, Have you tried the CMP? And Merry Christmas!

Lloyd Dumas
Lloyd Dumas
3 years ago
Reply to  Wild Bill

No I haven’t yet but plan to after the Holliday, and may you and family have a safe and happy Holliday also.

martin
martin
3 years ago

I was able to acquire a Garand a few year back with a serial number that indicates it was manufactured in 1944. It is in great condition and I hope to finally get it completely sighted in this coming Spring. Right now, it is sighted in cor 350 yards with iron sights.
One interesting thing is when you go to the range and hear the .223/5.56s popping away and you pull the trigger on the .30-06, there is dead silence for a few seconds after it goes off. Not certain why that is, but it sounds like authority to me.

Pete
Pete
3 years ago

I have two Garands. One in incredible condition I acquired from an individual who purchased it 25-30 years ago through DCM. I traded for the other. This latter has a five digit serial number which puts its production date as November, 1940.

I’ve always been a fan of the .30-06 in spite of the healthy recoil. The M1 is the most comfortable .30-06 I’ve ever shot. I’ve always said God inspired the .30-06 because He intended to inspire John Garand to design the M1.

Jim Macklin
Jim Macklin
3 years ago
Reply to  Pete

The M1 and John C. Garand originally designed and tested the Garand rifle to shoot a .276 cartridge. However the huge stocks of Army ammunition in 30/06 caused General Marshall to switch to 30/06. This was a good thing since WWII was just around the corner and a shortage of ammo was not needed. The Army did develop the M1 cartridge that used a 172 grain BT bullet which was standardized and then removed from service because it would shoot farther than the safe range on National Guard rifle ranges. The M2 Ball, flat base 150 grain bullet was adopted… Read more »

David Telliho
David Telliho
3 years ago
Reply to  Jim Macklin

Hatcher had a bit to do with the Garands developement. Details are in his ‘Notebook”