Gene Kimmi’s Borrowed Stand Buck

Gene Kimmi’s Borrowed Stand Buck
Gene Kimmi’s Borrowed Stand Buck

Whitetail Deer and the Hunters Who Take Big BucksU.S.A.-(Ammoland.com)- Jason Kimmi never believed that when he let his cousin Gene Kimmi sit in his stand for an afternoon hunt that he was giving away a buck of a lifetime. However, that was what happened. Jason earlier had taken a buck that would score between 140 or 150 from this stand. After Gene had taken his buck of a lifetime, Jason harvested a buck from the same stand in 2012 that scored in the 160s. Once you learn how this stand was set-up and what was on the property around it, you’ll understand why these two cousins took mature bucks there.

Forty-four-year-old Gene Kimmi from Lancaster, Kansas, and his cousin Jason have 400 acres with timber adjacent to some CRP land, 1/4-mile wide and a mile long. On the other side of the property is agriculture and one small pond with some timber around it. On one side of the fencerow is corn, and on the other side soybeans. The bucks on this property had everything they needed, including bedding, cover and their choice of soybeans or corn to eat, and on the CRP land, a pond for drinking water. Gene’s stand was on one side of the 400 acres, and Jason had a better deer stand along the fence row.

“Kansas only has a 12-day rifle season, so I try to hunt every day of the season that I can,” Gene explains. Gene called Jason and told him that he planned to hunt the third day of rifle season on November 4, 2011. Jason said he didn’t think he’d be able to hunt that day and asked, “Why don’t you hunt out of my stand? You haven’t hunted from my stand yet this year.” They talked about a big deer that Jason had seen on trail-camera pictures. But Gene mentioned to Jason that the only ones Jason had of this big buck were taken at night. “Generally, my 14 year old son, Kyle, would have been hunting with me,” Gene Kimmi remembers. “But he was grounded and couldn’t go hunting that day.”

That afternoon Gene arrived at Jason’s box blind that was about 6 feet off the ground.

“I saw an 8 point buck at about 4:00 pm that was a huge, high-racked buck,” Gene says. “Jason and I both had passed on this deer previously.” Gene looked on the north side of the property where the cornfield was and spotted several bucks feeding across the cut corn. In a few minutes, five bucks were in that field – two 9-pointers, an 8-pointer and two 6-pointers.

Gene remembers, “If Kyle had been with me, I’d have let him take a 9 pointer that would have scored about 140. I enjoyed watching the bucks for about 10 minutes. The bucks were spread out across the field with the closest buck about 130 yards away. The buck farthest away was about 200 yards and kept looking over his shoulder back into the woods.”

When the deer stepped out, Gene saw his massive rack and, “Whopping big body. I didn’t know if this buck was the one Jason had on a trail camera, but without a doubt this buck was a shooter.”
When the deer stepped out, Gene saw his massive rack and, “Whopping big body. I didn’t know if this buck was the one Jason had on a trail camera, but without a doubt this buck was a shooter.”

Gene knew that for that last buck to continuously watch the woodlot, a bigger buck must be coming. Finally he saw antlers through the brush in the woods. When the deer stepped out, Gene saw his massive rack and, “Whopping big body. I didn’t know if this buck was the one Jason had on a trail camera, but without a doubt this buck was a shooter.” The buck was only 125 yards from Gene in the box blind, and he took the shot with his 7mm Remington (https://www.remington.com) Magnum. When his Burris (http://www.burrisoptics.com/scopes) riflescope’s crosshairs settled just behind the massive deer’s shoulder, Gene simply squeezed the trigger.

“After I shot and got the gun back down to see the buck through the scope, he was standing where he’d been standing earlier when I shot, but facing the opposite direction,” Gene Kimmi reports. “The deer gave no indication that he was hit. I couldn’t believe it. I knew my gun and scope were sighted in and couldn’t think of why that buck still was standing where he’d been when I shot. I put another round in the chamber, aimed and squeezed off another shot. The buck vanished. I was puzzled, not believing I’d missed the buck of a lifetime twice.”

Gene climbed out of his stand and walked to the edge of the field where he’d spotted the buck. The buck had tipped over right where he’d stood, but he’d fallen into a low spot, preventing Gene from seeing him from his elevated stand. Gene looked for where the bullets had entered the buck and found that both shots were within 1 inch of each other in the heart/lung area. “I guess the first bullet went through the deer so quickly that he never felt it,” Gene observes. “When I shot the second time, he dropped like a rock.”

Unknown to Gene, Jason had arrived to hunt late that afternoon on the other side of the woodlot. So as soon as Jason heard the shots, he drove his truck to where Gene was hunting. Gene told him, “‘You said I could sit in your stand.’ I was concerned that he might be upset that I’d taken the big buck he’d spotted on his trail camera pictures. I’d been hunting the property for 24 years, and Jason had been hunting it with me since 2011. But he was happy for me and helped me load my deer up. When I arrived home, my son Kyle came out to the truck, and he was so excited. I told Kyle, ‘I’m sure glad you were grounded. If you’d been with me, you would have shot a 9 pointer that would’ve scored about 140. Then I probably never would have seen my huge buck.’”

  • BTR Score – Buckmasters’ Composite Score – Number of Inches: 185-6/8
  • Official Buckmasters’ Score: 169-7/8 (doesn’t include inside spread of main beams)

This is an excerpt from John E. Phillips newest book “Whitetail Deer and the Hunters Who Take Big Bucks”. Click here http://johninthewild.com/books/#deer to get more info about this deer hunting book and other deer hunting books by John E. Phillips

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