Hunt Fair Chase Initiative Releases the Principles of Fair Chase

Hunt Fair Chase Initiative Releases the Principles of Fair Chase
Hunt Fair Chase Initiative Releases the Principles of Fair Chase

Boone and Crockett ClubMISSOULA, Mont.-(Ammoland.com)- A new initiative launched by the Boone and Crockett Club – Hunt Right; Hunt Fair Chase – promotes the values and supports the ethical standards that have long been at the heart of our hunting heritage.

Club founder, Theodore Roosevelt, and the Boone and Crockett Club nationalized the concept of fair chase at a time when sportsmen of the day needed to separate themselves from a wrongful association with being no different than commercial market hunters whose only motivations were quantity of kill and profits.

“Fair chase is a commonly used term within the hunting community,” said CJ Buck, vice president of communications for the Boone and Crockett Club. “It's been around for well over 100 years, and many sportsmen practice and live by it, yet may not know it by name or its significance. Because fair chase is a morally grounding principle affecting the choices we make, it's a good idea to occasionally revisit its principles and see how they apply in today's world.”

Fair chase is an ethical way of hunting that enriches human character and virtues, both emotionally and intellectually, with the purpose of fostering the essential relationship between the human hunter and the life/death continuum in a way where hunting is not only in support of sustainable use conservation, but enhances the well-being of the species being hunted.

Buck explained, “Although hunting ethics are both a matter of personal choice and those deemed appropriate by the hunting community at large, the actions of individuals do represent all hunters, which can affect the way hunting is either publicly supported or opposed. It's therefore important for us, and those who do not hunt, to know that fair chase hunters share these important principles.”

The Fair Chase hunter:

  • Knows and obeys the law, and insists others do as well
  • Understands that it is not only about just what is legal, but also what is honorable and ethical
  • Defines “unfair advantage” as when the game does not have reasonable chance of escape
  • Cares about and respects all wildlife and the ecosystems that support them, which includes making full use of game animals taken
  • Measures success not in the quantity of game taken, but by the quality of the chase
  • Embraces the “no guarantees” nature of hunting
  • Uses technology in a way that does not diminish the importance of developing skills as a hunter or reduces hunting to just shooting
  • Knows his or her limitations, and stretches the stalk not the shot
  • Takes pride in the decisions he or she makes in the field and takes full responsibility for his or her actions

“These principles are important for many reasons,” Buck concluded. “If I had to put my finger on just one reason, it would be the fact that hunting is actually a privilege, not a right. Like any privilege, it is something that must be earned repeatedly. In our democratic society a fair chase approach helps to ensure our opportunity to hunt.”

For more information and to join the conversation visit huntfairchase.com.

About the Boone and Crockett Club

Founded by Theodore Roosevelt in 1887, the Boone and Crockett Club is the oldest conservation organization in North America and helped to establish the principles of wildlife and habitat conservation, hunter ethics, as well as many of the institutions, experts agencies, science and funding mechanisms for conservation. Member accomplishments include enlarging and protecting Yellowstone and establishing Glacier and Denali national parks, founding the U.S. Forest Service, National Park Service and National Wildlife Refuge System, fostering the Pittman-Robertson and Lacey Acts, creating the Federal Duck Stamp program, and developing the cornerstones of modern game laws. The Boone and Crockett Club is headquartered in Missoula, Montana. For details, visit www.boone-crockett.org.

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    GeorgiaoutlawRobert Rowe Recent comment authors
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    Georgiaoutlaw
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    Georgiaoutlaw

    How many guys and gals on here have used blue box federal rifle cartridges I have used them for several yrs with great success with this cheaper bullet but my point is it’s a great rifle cartridge in my 308 & 3006 with 150gr & the 180gr great bullet fast knockdown for less $20 a box of twenty u really can’t beat it in my oppion lol u can’t get any deader than dead and it does the job very well

    Georgiaoutlaw
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    Georgiaoutlaw

    Your comment does make some sense but don’t really agree 100 percent we have been doing this practice as long as dnr has made it legal to do so the deer aren’t any harder to get in ur sights ther smart ones and not so smart ones I really like the dumb ones lol

    Robert Rowe
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    Robert Rowe

    I am 77 years old and always hunted the old fashioned way like the Indians did, but now a very large portion of so called hunters throw out truck loads of some sort of food to bait the deer to their blind. This isn’t hunting it’s just ambushing there is no hunting skill what so ever involved. This practice has ruined hunting and the people doing it whine about the deer going nocturnal what do they expect? If someone stuffs me with food so I don’t have to go out and hunt for it I’ll lay around and sleep too.… Read more »

    Georgiaoutlaw
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    Georgiaoutlaw

    I like the idea that if I got a wounded deer r hog that I can go anywhere to recover the animal but wen it does happen wen possible we always ok it with the property owner we never had a problem with the owner not being cooperative with us in going to try and retrieve the animal but fortunately it doesn’t happen often