AZGFD Warning: Halloween Decorations May Attract Wildlife

Arizona Halloween Wildlife
Arizona Halloween Wildlife

Arizona Game and Fish DepartmentPHOENIX, Ariz. -(Ammoland.com)- Halloween is on the horizon and soon those carefully carved pumpkins sitting outside may be attracting some unwanted trick-or-treaters: hungry wildlife looking for an easy meal.

As such, the Arizona Game and Fish Department (AZGFD) reminds area residents to be aware that Halloween pumpkins and other fall decorations, such as gourds or squash, can attract wildlife when displayed outdoors.

AZGFD recommends that jack-o-lanterns, uncarved pumpkins and cornucopias be displayed indoors on window sills so they can be seen from outside if desired, and discarded securely to help prevent encounters with foraging wildlife.

“Pumpkins and other edible decorations are easy meals for wildlife and often attract javelina, coyotes, deer and even bears,” said Mike Demlong, AZGFD Wildlife Education program manager. “Habituating wildlife to human food sources can lead to conflicts, resulting in potentially serious injuries to people or pets and even property damage. That is why it is important to help keep wildlife wild.”

Additionally, unintentional or intentional feeding can cause problems for wildlife, such as obesity and malnutrition, and promote the spread of disease.

The public is reminded that it is illegal under state law (A.R.S. 13-2927) to feed wildlife in Pima, Maricopa and Pinal counties, with the exception of birds as well as tree squirrels, which are rare at lower elevations.

Other wildlife may eat bird seed, so birds are best fed only in an enclosed yard, preferably from a bird feeder. A tray can be attached beneath a feeder to catch spillover seed. Seed blocks should be placed in an enclosed area or on a secure raised platform.

People who live in or visit Arizona can expect to see many species of wildlife. More and more often though, wild animals are venturing into areas where people live.

Sometimes the wildlife becomes a problem, either by hammering on the side of the house, digging a den under the front porch, or eating all of your brand new landscaping plants. You can usually enjoy wildlife watching from a distance, but sometimes wildlife encounters involve conflict.

Preventing problems with wildlife is much simpler and less aggravating than dealing with the problems after they occur. Fortunately, taking a few simple steps can help you prevent many of the most common wildlife-related problems around your home. A number of proven methods can be used to solve the problem when it cannot be prevented.

These web pages were developed to provide residents of Arizona with information about how to coexist with Arizona’s wildlife, especially in urban areas.

For tips on minimizing conflicts with wildlife, visit their website.

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    Dave in FairfaxDr Timothy-Allen Albertson Recent comment authors
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    Dr Timothy-Allen Albertson
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    Dr Timothy-Allen Albertson

    A wild pig on my back porch is a dangerous animal whose remains will soon be on their way to a soup kitchen and my deep-freeze (and those of family and friends.) A deeer on my back porch is a dumb cretin that needs to be removed from the deer gene pool and whose remains are on their way to my deep freeze.

    Dave in Fairfax
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    Dave in Fairfax

    Can I get an AMEN?