CZ P10 C After 1,100 Rounds | Is The Hype Real? – VIDEO

The CZ P10 C is poised to take on the great poly pistols on the market, but is it equipped to take on the competition? The only way to find out is to shoot the gun. A lot. Like 5,000 rounds a lot.

CZ- P10 C After 1,100 rounds.
CZ- P10 C After 1,100 rounds.

U.S.A.-(Ammoland.com)- Since the launch of my new YouTube channel, The Firearm Rack, I have been committed to answering questions like how do I feel about the CZ P10 C after 1,100 rounds. While there is nothing wrong with surface level reviews, I wanted to provide the shooting community with a more in-depth review that can honestly answer if the hype is real or if other publications are just spoon feeding marketing lines from the manufacturer.

To get right to the point, I can’t tell you if the hype is real quite yet but I can tell you that the pistol is very good. I am going to be testing this handgun to 5,000 rounds in order to simulate between 5 to 10 years of normal ownership by the average gun owner according to data collected by the NSSF.



Overall Impressions

My overall impressions of the P10 C after 1,100 rounds are that the gun is a solid contender as long as reliability continues to be outstanding. So far the pistol has devoured 1,000 rounds of mixed range ammunition and 100 rounds of Federal HST in the 147-grain flavor without any malfunctions that were not intentionally induced as part of a training drill.

Earlier this year I was able to shoot a pre-production CZ P10 C and noticed that the pistol’s controls were rather stiff and hard to use even after several dry fire sessions and a couple of range trips, naturally the first thing I checked when I got the production model P10 C was the controls and found that they wore in rather quickly and became butter smooth during a single dry fire session. The other reservation I had about the pistol due to my prior experience was the grip texture that I previously felt to be over aggressive. I can safely say after three range trips and 1,100 rounds of slow fire that the grip texture is flat out not a problem.

Slide rail wear after 1,100 rounds.
Slide rail wear after 1,100 rounds.

There are a few things about the gun that I grew to really appreciate like the forward slide serrations that offer a sharp and positive purchase on the pistol when manipulating the slide. I found them invaluable for not only press checks but clearing malfunctions as well. Sure it isn’t the ‘recommended’ way of doing things, but it works well for me.

There were only a couple of aspects of the CZ P10 C that I felt could use some improvement, the aluminum sights, and the trigger shoe. The sights are a bit on the soft side being made from aluminum, and I always prefer something that doesn’t deform easily for notch and post sights.

The trigger, on the other hand, is shaped in a way that it leaves two ‘fangs’ on the bottom of the trigger shoe when your finger is on the face of the trigger. Also, the trigger shoe places my finger in such a way that my finger gets rubbed a bit raw on extended range sessions making anything past about 300-350 rounds tiresome.

The trigger shoe was modified with a file out in the field to remove the sharp points.
The trigger shoe was modified with a file out in the field to remove the sharp points.

Part Replacements & Wear

While replacing the factory sights on the CZ P10 C I took a close look at finish wear on the inside of the slide, on the slide rails, and of course the internal small parts. Why was I replacing the sights? I knocked the pistol off a table while at the range and the gun landed on the front sight, damaging it badly because of the sight’s aluminum construction.

The replacement Dawson front sight
The replacement Dawson front sight
Dawson's carry rear sight for the P10 C.
Dawson’s carry rear sight for the P10 C.

Starting with the inside of the slide we find that the pistol is wearing at about the same rate that we would expect when compared to other guns that I have put through the same firing schedule. The slight finish wear didn’t cause any alarm, the slight deformity of the ejector was something that I took notice of.

The only area on the gun that showed heavy finish wear was the bottom of the slide where the slide lock contacts the bottom of the slide. The P10 C doesn’t have cutouts for the slide lock would catch but instead uses a crossbar that pops up to block the feed strip area of the breech face.

Wear on the breach face feed strip.
Wear on the breach face feed strip.

What’s Next

Since we just finished up with 1,000 rounds of painstaking slow fire while doing the ball and dummy drill, I think that the next 500 rounds will probably be a drill working on transitions, then maybe a few hundred holster presentations and then finish up that 1,000 rounds with emergency reload drills.

I am not ready to label the CZ P10 C as a solid buy quite yet, but it is looking like that is going to be my determination on the pistol as I spend more time with it. I might even go so far as to say that between the CZ P10 C and the FN 509, there is a real solid chance that one of these might replace the Glock 17/19 that is my go-to pistol currently.

A DSG Arms CDC Holster for the CZ P10 C, the author's current carry rig.
A DSG Arms CDC Holster for the CZ P10 C, the author’s current carry rig.

Special thanks to:


About Patrick R.Patrick Roberts

Patrick is a firearms enthusiast that values the quest for not only the best possible gear setup, but also pragmatic ways to improve his shooting skills across a wide range of disciplines. He values truthful, honest information above all else and had committed to cutting through marketing fluff to deliver the truth. You can find the rest of his work on FirearmRack.com as well as on the YouTube channel Firearm Rack or Instagram at @thepatrickroberts.

0 0 votes
Article Rating
11 Comments
Inline Feedbacks
View all comments
Vincent Brady

I like the CZ product line but the Canik TP9SFx is far and away a better pistol as well as a better value. See for yourself at UTube reviews and the specs at the Canik website.

American Patriot

If you have never had any malfunctions with this gun then why at the beginning of the video did you keep racking the slide after only firing a few rounds?

JoeUSooner

I had a chance to test-fire a P10C two months ago, and I was very impressed. By the time I fired it, the pistol had already had over 500 rounds cycled through, and the trigger was smooth. I was able to maintain a consistent grouping under 3″ at ten yards, and held a 4″ grouping during rapid-fire. The recoil was certainly manageable.

The available pricing in my area is under $500, and I expect that to drop a bit over time. I like that pistol!

gcm

that firearm looks like it has never been lubed at all from the pictures. that is a whole lot of wear for only 1100 hundred rounds through it, and not to mention the slide sticking and mag not fitting correctly. I run Glocks and have several and I have put thousands of rounds through them all and the slides and ejectors and other parts don’t look like that. I lube mine probably more than recommended but never had broken or excessive wore parts ever. Yes I do have other brands of pistols and I lube them all well also but… Read more »

brasshopper

I have the same issue with my trigger finger rubbing with the Glock line of pistols . Both guns same to be good but I would like to see the trigger guard redesigned for us guys with bigger fingers. Or redesign the trigger would be helpful

Vanns40

That’s a nice review. When you talk about “finish wear”, that has never been a concern to me as any metal to metal contact will create that and it’s only cosmetic. It’s a gun I carry not a delicate piece of art. What I would be concerned about would be any striations on the metal in those areas that have finish wear. That’s indicative of metal gouging on metal. Since you didn’t mention it I’m assuming (hate to use that word) that you didn’t notice any. Back to my first sentence. From having spoken to a couple of reviewers, I… Read more »