It’s Time to Fix Our Broken Prison System

By Newt Gingrich and Audrey Bird

NTOA Cell Extraction Procedures Course
It’s Time to Fix Our Broken Prison System

USA – -(AmmoLand.com)- How big is our nation’s prison problem?

Let’s look at the numbers. One in 31 adults in the United States is either behind bars, on parole, or on probation. Since the 1980s, when Congress implemented mandatory minimum sentences for drug offenders, the federal prison population in the United States skyrocketed from 24,000 to over 183,000 federal inmates today.

The process is even worse on the local level. For example, in 2018, there were more than 1.31 million state prisoners. With these staggering statistics, it is not shocking that over the course of a 33-year period, state and local spending on corrections saw an increase of 324 percent by 2012 – three times the amount of growth for education spending.

This data is hard to ignore, which is why President Trump, along with Republicans and Democrats in Congress are making prison reform a priority.

On April 18 a bipartisan group of prison reform advocates, including Jared Kushner, Van Jones, and Grover Norquist, joined the American Conservative Union, Families Against Mandatory Minimums, and other groups for a lobby day on Capitol Hill. Their goal is to push Congress to pass the Prison Reform and Redemption Act (H.R. 3356). The bill, sponsored by Representative Doug Collins (R-GA) and backed by Representative Hakeem Jeffries (D-NY), is a bipartisan attempt to reduce recidivism rates for soon-to-be released inmates.

The legislation would require the Bureau of Prisons (BOP) to create and implement risk assessment tools and recidivism reduction plans for each inmate and would require the BOP to create rehabilitative programs with the collaboration of groups, such as nonprofits, faith, or community based organizations. These programs would include job training, workforce development, and – importantly – opioid and heroin treatment plans.

Another portion of this bill would give eligible, nonviolent criminals the opportunity to earn time credits to be applied toward their sentences as a result of their successful participation. The goal is to give inmates the tools they need to succeed when they leave prison, so they don’t end up returning.

These measures would help reduce prison populations, make our communities safer, and boost the economy as more able-bodied people leave prison and find work.

Prison reform is one of our nation’s most pressing issues, yet with the media’s insatiable desire to report on anything other than substance, it should come as no surprise that many Americans are unaware of this proposed bipartisan legislation. Likewise, the White House’s support of measures that enact reforms to reduce recidivism rates has gone largely unreported.

While President Trump and Attorney General Jeff Sessions are steadfast in their commitment to remain tough on crime, they also recognize the benefits of implementing programs that prepare inmates to re-enter society. In fact, during a meeting on prison reform at the White House on January 11, President Trump said, “Two thirds of the 650,000 people released from prison each year are arrested again within three years. We can help break this vicious cycle through job training… mentoring, and drug addiction treatment.”

Passing the Collins-Jeffries Prison Reform and Redemption Act is the perfect opportunity for Republicans to show leadership and focus on a bipartisan issue that affects many Americans across the country.

According to a 2010 report by The Pew Charitable Trusts, one out of every 28 children in America has at least one parent incarcerated. At the same time 25 percent of U.S. prisoners are nonviolent drug offenders. Many of these people need treatment for their addictions – not jail time.

It is time for a change within state and federal correction systems. Jared Kushner may have conveyed it best in his recent interview with ABC, in which he said, “The Administration wants to assist long-time prison reform advocates with their initiative to create a prison system that will rehabilitate citizens who have made mistakes, paid the price, and are deserving of a second chance…”

Even those who are unmoved by the humanitarian need for prison reform should be able to see the fiscal sense it makes. On average, it costs taxpayers, $31,977.65 per year to incarcerate each federal inmate.

Preventing released inmates from returning to prison will ultimately reduce the cost of the federal prison system dramatically. Perhaps this money can be used to start chipping away at our $21 trillion national debt.

Your Friend,
Newt

Newt Gingrich
Newt Gingrich

P.S. Copies of Callista's new children's book, Hail to the Chief, and my new book Understanding Trump are now available

About Newt Gingrich

Newt Gingrich is well-known as the architect of the “Contract with America” that led the Republican Party to victory in 1994 by capturing the majority in the U.S. House of Representatives for the first time in forty years. After he was elected Speaker, he disrupted the status quo by moving power out of Washington and back to the American people.

Gingrich Productions is a performance and production company featuring the work of Newt Gingrich and Callista Gingrich. Visit : www.gingrichproductions.com

Subscribe
Notify of
18 Comments
Inline Feedbacks
View all comments
Wild Bill
Wild Bill
2 years ago

@Newt, Newt writes, “One in 31 adults in the United States is either behind bars, on parole, or on probation.” then some how concludes that the system is broken. Not logical and insulting to every cop, prosecutor, jury, judge and appellate judge that did there job, thoughtfully and correctly.
The fault lies with the father that was not there; the parents that failed to teach, the family that failed to support, and the culture that glorifies crime, Newt.

O-Hebi
O-Hebi
2 years ago

This is a no-brainer. We have already seen what happens when prohibition is abolished. The market falls out of the bottom thus making it less profitable, the gangsters have nothing to fight over, tax revenue increases, and number of prisoner inmates decrease significantly. Couple that with making people responsible for their choices and it becomes an all around win-win.

Carlo
Carlo
2 years ago

Prisoners have it way to easy in jail. They should not get TV, Recreation, weight lifting (for the obvious reason and if you can’t figure that out you’re an idiot) fed in their cells, none of the privileges they currently enjoy like commissary. They should get only the barest of necessities. Why we continue to put our CO’s in harms way is beyond me. I wouldn’t care if they were fed bread and water three times a day. They commit inhuman acts so treat them the same way.

JoeUSooner
JoeUSooner
2 years ago
Reply to  Carlo

Carlo… that blanket statement is too generic.

Yes, the violent criminal inmates have indeed committed inhuman acts… but the point is that the majority of inmates are non-violent (usually drug-related) offenders. Separate the issue by degrees of importance. Get those non-violent inmates out of prison and into rehab programs, and stop wasting ridiculous amount of taxpayer money on blindly-applied imprisonment programs that have nothing to do with preventing, eliminating, or punishing serious crime.

Then throw away the key on the career violent criminals.

Carlo
Carlo
2 years ago
Reply to  JoeUSooner

I was a cop for 25 years don’t tell me drug uses are non violent. They break into homes, Rob people at gun point, break into homes so yes they all need to b locked away. Or do what China did. If u dont know the answer to that look it up.

Richard Hilton
Richard Hilton
2 years ago

The problem is they no longer have a fear of the consequences of their actions. The bleeding hearts want to treat them like naughty children but it’s time to return to the of instilling fear in the hearts of the criminals no more life sentences, no more letting someone live on death row for 10 years or more waiting well we support them in better conditions than most senior citizens have and most working poor have. They’re in prison not a country club they don’t need a television set or a computer what they need is to work from dawn… Read more »

Douglas Kuykendall
Douglas Kuykendall
2 years ago

Well Van Jones on the board tells it all.Lets go back to how these bastards was raised? Do the crime do the time.Now this board wants them back on mommy’s tit nipple the whole way through life.I was ten when my father was killed.( dozer over turned on pipeline job)Mother raised six of use by her self.Everyone turn out great. I raised two boys by myself.They turned out great.So how about raising your kids right,Get God Back in America,things will turn around.

Matt in Oklahoma
Matt in Oklahoma
2 years ago

Just like the gun issue your blaming everything but the person itself. The BOP already has these touchy feely programs in place and O let a bunch of the drug dealers out and sentences are being reduced. ALL OF THIS IS MEANINGLESS UNLESS THE CRIMINALS CHANGE. Even after the Drug and Alcohol Programs they take majority are coming back in within months often before they even hit the streets because they are doing drugs and/or committing other crimes. There are useless laws that could be changed that would help and accepting the fact that Americans raised some criminally minded people… Read more »

Marc DV .
Marc DV .
2 years ago

Don’t Know How to Handle the Problem
But ! in N Y. it’s 3 hots and a cot and Ya
Get ta Vote on It now, HOW BOUT DAT !

Roy D.
Roy D.
2 years ago

Thanks Newt, for nothing. Another case of those who know little to nothing about that which they speak. Spend over twenty years working in a Federal prison and then get back to me on how to handle the situation. I have stated before and will state again my “solution” to the incarceration “problem.” If someone commits a crime for which the victim could have legitimately used deadly force to prevent the commission of said crime, the perpetrator of said crime should be put to death following a jury trial conviction and one unsuccessful appeal. Never happen, but one can dream… Read more »

Matt in Oklahoma
Matt in Oklahoma
2 years ago
Reply to  Roy D.

Newt is and always has been so far detached from most subjects he tries to regulate it’s not even funny. I’ve yet to figure out how he’s an author on this site.

Docduracoat
Docduracoat
2 years ago

The problem of drug abuse is a conundrum. The war on drugs has been a war on our own people and had been a colossal failure. Locking up literally millions of minority men has left an entire generation of children without fathers. This has led directly to the current gang, crime, gun and violence problem in our inner cities. The prison industry of locking these people up in mostly rural prisons and charging outrageous telephone fees makes it even worse. Total legalization is likely not a good answer. We need to lock up the violent criminals which is not currently… Read more »

joe
joe
2 years ago
Reply to  Docduracoat

I think that I am agreeing with you when I say that the problem is not drugs, per se, but us the American people. Punitive measures are put into place to stop the negative effects that illegal drug use has on society. If this punishment were to dissuade people from drug use then it would be a success and society would benefit. But we insist on using illegal drugs and so punishment seems to not work. We are then left with a conundrum; if we legalize drugs then not only have we admitted failure, but undoubtedly more people will ruin… Read more »

Roy D.
Roy D.
2 years ago
Reply to  joe

“Our Constitution was made only for a moral and religious people. It is wholly inadequate to the government of any other.”

John Adams

throwedoff
throwedoff
2 years ago
Reply to  Docduracoat

I have been working in corrections in my state for close to twenty years. I have yet to come across an incarcerated individual who is doing time for merely possessing drugs for his/her own use. Every drug offense convicted individual that I have dealt with was in possession of quantities of illegals drugs that got them convicted for possession with intent to distribute or distribution. The idea that drug addicts are being locked up with big time sentences is not factually true. If they received a felony conviction with large amounts of time to serve, then there is more to… Read more »

Roy D.
Roy D.
2 years ago
Reply to  throwedoff

Thanks Throwedoff, you have stated the truth that the SJWs either don’t know or try to conceal. One of those people is none other than Senator Rand Paul. In most cases it is nothing other than an attempt to curry favor with low class Blacks and their sycophants in the US for political purposes.

SuperG
SuperG
2 years ago

My program was simpler. Execute the violent criminal after his conviction of their third violent felony. That would free up a lot of bed space. Then you also would not need to plea bargain either. Then, as a condition of release, the inmate must complete a full high school curriculum while in prison. Then we offer to pay for the first 2 years of college if they maintain a set GPA, then offer them a zero interest student loan if they want a BA. We’d have the money to do that by having executed the criminal that had no hope… Read more »

Ken H.
Ken H.
2 years ago
Reply to  SuperG

Modify the college option to include a choice of graduation from an approved trades (carpentry, electrical, plumbing, etc.), health/medical or technology program. These would likely be more attractive to many, and much more beneficial to society, than college.