Pricing and How to Buy a Military Surplus CMP 1911 Pistol

Military Funding Bill Establishes Mandatory Program to Sell Historic Pistols to the Public
Pricing and How to Buy a Military Surplus CMP 1911 Pistol

U.S.A.-(Ammoland.com)- While the National Defense Authorization Act granted transfer of a maximum of 10,000 1911s per year to the CMP, the Secretary of the Army allowed only 8,000 1911s to be transferred to the CMP for sale and distribution this fiscal year. Some of those are anticipated to be unusual and worthy of being auctioned. The remaining number will be sold based on a computerized Random Number Generator.

The CMP does not know what next year’s allotment might be.

THE PROCEDURES FOR PURCHASING 1911 TYPE PISTOLS FROM CMP 1911

Every applicant will be treated as a new customer to CMP.

Previous purchases or relationships with CMP create no advantage or disadvantage to the customer.

CMP 1911 is an FFL governed operation and is a separate entity from CMP and has its own record keeping operation with no ties to the existing CMP records.

CMP 1911 CUSTOMER PURCHASE DETAILS:

  1. CMP 1911 order form packet will be posted on the CMP website thecmp.org on 4 June 2018 for download – click on CMP 1911 icon.
  2. CMP 1911 customer service number is 256-835-8455 extension 461.
  3. CMP 1911 customer service email address [email protected]
  4. Only ONE CMP 1911 order form packet per customer may be submitted.
  5. CMP 1911 order form packet must be mailed to the following address. This includes USPS, UPS, Fed Ex, etc. Orders must be postmarked NOT PRIOR TO 4 September 2018 and NOT AFTER 4 October 2018. Any orders received postmarked prior to September 4 will not be accepted. Hand delivered, emailed and faxed orders will not be accepted. Only orders sent to the following CMP 1911 address will be accepted: CMP 1911, 1800 Roberts Drive, Anniston, AL 36207
  6. Customer names from complete CMP 1911 order form packets will be fed into a computerized Random Number Generator on 5 October 2018. The Random Number Generator will provide a list of names in sequential order through the random picking process. Customers will be contacted in the sequence provided by the Random Number Generator. The CMP 1911 customers will select their grade of pistol (Service, Field or Rack) from available inventory at the time of order notification. Customers with higher numbers may have fewer grades from which to choose. When this year’s allotment of 1911s is exhausted, the remaining orders will be held in the existing sequence for all future allotments of 1911s. The CMP does not know what future allotments might be.

CMP 1911 FFL CONTACT INFORMATION DETAILS:

All 1911’s will be shipped to a 01, 02 or 07 Federal Firearms License. Customers MUST provide a signed copy of the 01, 02 or 07 FFL.

  1. CMP 1911 dedicated fax number 256-831-2354 for FFL dealers to fax their FFLs with the customer’s name attached.
  2. CMP 1911 dedicated email address [email protected] to send their FFLs with customer's name attached.
  3. CMP 1911 is currently accepting FFL contacts pursuant to FFL requirements.

CMP 1911 PRICING:

CMP has priced the 1911 type pistols at fair market value in accordance with CMP's enabling legislation.

Service Grade $1050. Pistol may exhibit minor pitting and wear on exterior surfaces and friction surfaces. Grips are complete with no cracks. Pistol is in issuable condition.

Field Grade $950. Pistol may exhibit minor rust, pitting, and wear on exterior surfaces and friction surfaces. Grips are complete with no cracks. Pistol is in issuable condition.

Rack Grade $850. Pistol will exhibit rust, pitting, and wear on exterior surfaces and friction surfaces. Grips may be incomplete and exhibit cracks. Pistol requires minor work to return to issuable condition.

Auction Grade (Sales will to be determined by auctioning the pistol). The condition of the auction pistol will be described when posted for auction. Note: If you have already purchased a 1911 from CMP you will not be allowed to purchase an auction 1911. If you purchase an auction 1911, your name will be pulled from the sequenced list. No repeat purchasers are allowed until all orders received have been filled.

The shipping cost is included in the price.

ADDITIONAL CMP 1911 DETAILS:

  1. Potential purchasers will have to provide CMP with a set of CMP 1911 documents exhibiting: 1) proof of U.S. Citizenship, 2) proof of membership in a CMP affiliated club, 3) proof of participation in a marksmanship activity, 4) a completed 1911 order form, including a new form 2A with notary, 5) a signed copy of the 01, or 02, or 07 Federal Firearms License in which the 1911 will be transferred to. All qualifying documents must be included in your order packet. No qualifying documents, other than the FFL, will be accepted without an order packet. Note: The signed copy of the FFL may be faxed or emailed to CMP 1911 with the customer name attached. CMP Eligibility Requirements for ordering may be viewed on the CMP website.
  2. A NICS background check on each customer will be performed by the FBI to assure the customer is eligible to purchase prior to shipment to the FFL licensed dealer. The customer must receive a “proceed” from NICS prior to shipment of the pistol to the FFL licensed dealer.
  3. The CMP customer will be required to complete a Form 4473 in person at the FFL dealer’s place of business and successfully pass a NICS check, in which the information is provided by the FFL holder to NICS, before the pistol can be transferred. This is a second NICS check performed on the customer. Note: The FFL licensed dealer in which the pistol is retrieved from will have to follow all federal, state, and local laws.
  4. All orders by customers will have to be filled prior to any customer getting the opportunity to purchase a second CMP 1911.
  5. No 1911s will be available in the CMP stores, or online. Only mail order sales will be accepted. All 1911 orders must be delivered via USPS, UPS, Fed EX, etc. to the CMP 1911 address listed above. No in-store or at the door drop off orders will be accepted.
  6. CMP will stop accepting orders at the end of business on 4 October 2018. Customer’s names will be loaded into the Random Number Generator. The sequenced order for customers will be established and each time CMP receives 1911s, customer orders will be filled in the originally established sequence. No one will be allowed to repeat purchase until all orders are filled.
  7. The customer’s sequence number will be sent to the individual via email once such sequence number is established.
  8. Customers will be contacted in the sequence provided by the Random Number Generator.
  9. Pistol grade and payment arrangement will be established when the customer is contacted by CMP sales staff at time of purchase. DO NOT send payment with your 1911 order. Customers will have 5 days to submit payment once notified.
  10. 1911s from CMP will be allowed in California because they meet the California definition of Curio and Relic. They will ship to 01, or 02, or 07 FFLs in California. At of the time of this release, only the state of Massachusetts will not allow the sale of the 1911/1911A1 pistol.
  11. All required information is included in this release. If you have questions, please email the address listed above. If you choose to call the number listed, please be prepared for a long wait time.

REASONS FOR THE TWO NICS CHECKS:

First Reason: The first NICS conducted by the FBI for the CMP makes sure the customer can legally possess the 1911 type pistol prior to shipping it to the local 01, or 02, or 07 FFL dealer. The CMP, Congress, and the United States Army do not want the 1911 to have to be returned to CMP 1911 if the purchaser is not legal to possess. The more time the pistol is in transit, the more likely it is that it could be lost or stolen. The second NICS check is performed by the FBI for the local 01, or 02, or 07 FFL in accordance with their standard transfer procedures and all federal, state, and local laws.

Second Reason: CMP’s enabling legislation mandated by Congress specifies that the purchaser “successfully pass a thorough and complete background check”, i.e. NICS. CMP cannot turn any firearm over to the purchaser until it receives a “proceed” from NICS; the local FFL can turn the pistol over after 72 business hours have elapsed if they have not heard back from NICS. Turning the pistol over after 72 hours and not getting a “proceed” does not satisfy CMP’s enabling legislation mandated by Congress. This leaves CMP no choice but to have a NICS check performed by the FBI and to get a “proceed” to satisfy its enabling legislation, before shipping to the local 01, or 02, or 07 FFL dealer.

Note: 1911 type pistols purchased from CMP cannot be transferred to 03 FFL (curio and relic) license holders. CMP’s legislation contained in the 2018 NDAA specifies FFL licensed dealers. BATF and the United States Army prefer the second background check be performed by the FBI on an FFL licensed dealer’s premises.


About The Civilian Marksmanship Program:Civilian Marksmanship Program

The Civilian Marksmanship Program is a federally chartered 501 (c) (3) non-profit corporation. It is dedicated to firearm safety and marksmanship training and to the promotion of marksmanship competition for citizens of the United States.

For more information about the CMP and its programs, log onto their website.

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Wild BillgcmDAVID AGERChristopher VenticinqueSkinfish Recent comment authors
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gcm
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gcm

If you have to ask the price, you can’t afford one.

DAVID AGER
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DAVID AGER

I can remember when the DCM was selling M1 carbines for $20 delivered, and M1 Garands for $99…they were a glut on the market back in those days..now the CMP does not have any M1 Carbines and look at the prices on M1 Garands..doubt if the recently repatriated lend lease Garands from our allies will reduce the prices..since this is the first time that I can remember the government selling 1911A1’s, there will be a complete sellout of these veteran firearms..but not of my money. !!

Christopher Venticinque
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Christopher Venticinque

@Tom
Really, “no one is making a personal profit” HA!
Just like Blue Cross/ Blue Shield, another non-profit company.
(I wonder how many millionaires sit on that CMP Board of Directors)
I’m sure the CMP is only doing what the Fed has allowed, selling off their (our) Surplus pistols and rifles.
for a profit that they share with their supplier, us US citizens? NOT
As far as buying a piece of history,CMP guns, are worn out , over priced and completely not worth buying even for their historical value

Steve K
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Steve K

The fact that they will not ship to my C&R license was the deal breaker for me. So they do the NCIS check prior to shipping to the dealer. Once he receives it it will be transferred to me without a background check as the check is not required for a dealer to C&R transfer. Therefore they will only get one background check irregardless of what they think. Just more hassle and expense for me. I’ll pass on these 45 autos.

David Ager
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David Ager

The US Government paid around $30 for a 1911A1 during WW2..now a government chartered corporation, the CMP, is selling used and abused 1911A1’s for 30X the WW2 cost of new ones…unlike the DCM, which derived its operating funds from the US Army budget, the CMP is selling firearms and accessories at a profit..a win for the Government as they do have to pay a contractor to destroy them and a win for the CMP as they now have something new to sell..not so sure about a win for the buyer, but I predict they will sell out every year they… Read more »

Wild Bill
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Wild Bill

@David A, that thirty dollars in 1945 is about $600 in todays devalued fiat money. Those thirty dollars were backed in gold and silver, now, our currency is backed by nothing. Trading paper with pretty pictures on it for something that shoots is always a good deal.

Jay in Wisconsin
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Jay in Wisconsin

Unless you’re in a CMP-associated “club” you can’t get one anyways. Seems like the field of opportunity is relatively small which could be justification for the exorbitant pricing. Just my opinion. I, personally, would never buy one – historical or not – because even the top grade requires some measure of refinishing work to make it a displayable collector piece! I’m not impressed.

Pete
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Pete

For less money, buy an older Mk. IV Series 70. It was the last true 1911A1. Parts are interchangeable with the WW II issued guns.

HankB
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HankB

I had a Mk IV Series 70 Government Model, also known as the Jammamatic. With its split collet bushing and tapered barrel it most certainly was NOT a “true” 1911A1 and parts were NOT fully interchangeable with WWII issued guns. (Eventually, Colt’s discontinued the split collet barrel bushing as a disaster.) And in any case, even after multiple trips back to Colt’s for their laughable “warranty service” it remained a jammamatic. Never bought another Colt.

MikeH
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MikeH

Just curious, which parts were not interchangeable with WWII guns?

Skinfish
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Skinfish

I have owned a Model 70 for thirty years and have shot thousands of rounds through it. I have never had a jam with that gun, not once. It has been a very reliable firearm for me and that includes shooting a ton of reloads through it as well as store bought. I would highly recommend a Colt Mk IV Series model 70 for anyone looking for a great, reliable handgun.

Todd
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Todd

We’re tax payers. We’ve already paid for em once. Just sayin’.

Richard
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Richard

I have to agree with the majority of comments, the high prices aren’t justified!

Stephenie
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Stephenie

If so many people are willing to pay the prices they are asking, the price, by definition is justified. A car bought in individual pieces costs about $1,000,000 where as it might be a car that costs in the range of $30,000 – $40,000 as a whole. Does that mean when we buy the parts the prices are unjustified. No, because the market is willing to bear that cost.

American Patriot
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American Patriot

Definitely not worth it, I’ll stick with New mfr or most likely just stick with what I have. I know the one I was issued in the mid 70’s I wouldn’t pay 400 for now.

Rev C
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Rev C

I agree these guns are overpriced but I suspect they will sell out quickly. If we say there are between two and three hundred million guns in America and assume most folk own say two or three; that means there are approximately 100 million gun owners. If even a quarter of those are what we would categorize as enthusiasts, then there are about 25 million interested buyers. If 1 percent of them have the interest, the ability and the funds to purchase that still puts the buying pool at 250,000 and that is well beyond the inventory. I hope I’m… Read more »

HankB
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HankB

I think you’re right . . . the CMP only needs about 8000 suckers – errr, I mean interested buyers – to sell out. And in a world where some are willing to pay $3000 for an “ultra HD audiophile blu ray disc player” or any of a number of other absurdly overpriced items they’ll probably have more buyers lining up than they have guns available. And a few people will make a few bucks reselling them.

Patrick Sperry
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Patrick Sperry

These are priced for people that want one for historical value, not primarily as a shooter. Since we have a Singer produced piece that my Grandfather used in WW2? I am going to pass.

TexasGunGal
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TexasGunGal

You have a SINGER made .45 ???? Wow!!!! Every time I go to see someone’s SINGER….they turn out to be a Remington Rand….or other more common variant. I presume you know what that SINGER rarity is worth? Put it in a BANK safety deposit box…or somewhere secure and watch its value grow. My dad….turned his .45 auto in after his B17 was shot down and they successfully belly-landed. Everybody else on the crew….said the “Lost Their .45” but not Lucky Chuck…who stood by the letter of the law and the expectation that WWII Army Air Corps navigators were expected to… Read more »

Bud
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Bud

Holy Cow!?? Just go by a brand new Kimber and know you have your money’s worth.

Tom
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Tom

Vanns40, obviously I’m not the only one who feels these are vastly over priced. The reason to me is clear someone is making bank off of them. Seems obvious but to each their own.

Have a great day.

Wild Bill
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Wild Bill

@Tom, The CMP is not selling a pistol for shooting. The CMP is selling a piece of history. No one at CMP is making a personal profit.

gcm
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gcm

@Wb, I know cmp is doing good things for our youth, and the next generations of shooters donating funds for the cause. I get it, but from what I read about the whole situation of the Garand’s and the .45’s after you jump through all the hoops, and red tape so to speak, their is no guarantee you will get one of the .45’s as they put all the names in a computer, and randomly draw them. I guess they have to have a system in place for the amount of folks that wants one, and this years lottery only… Read more »

gcm
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gcm

@Wb, sorry, everything I just posted before this one is right in the story, which I did not read, Duh,
I was going by what’s on their website, as I get emails from them with their offerings, I did have my coffee this morning, so im not sure what my problem is today. Again, sorry.

Wild Bill
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Wild Bill

@gcm, Nothing to be sorry about, brother! I can understand about that coffee thing, though! My lovely wife, the former PSGT, and Bronze star awardee, makes coffee the army way. It says “Asphalt” on the can. We had to stop pouring the excess down the kitchen sink because it was clogging up the septic system. Now, we are using it to pave the ranch road to the highway. The county thought that it looked so nice, they want to give her a contract. Have a good day!

Vanns40
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Vanns40

@Tom: Your comment shows you believe CMP operates to enrich themselves personally. If this is your belief you are ignorant of the basic CMP rules of operation. Start reading.

Vanns40
Guest
Vanns40

Okay, before we go off the rails and have collective heart attacks let’s all take a deep breath and have a beer. Are the prices WAY out of wack with what I believe is reasonable, you bet they are. Am I interested in buying one, nope. Now that that’s out of the way let’s look at what happens if they’re sitting on 8,000 of these and only a total of 1,000 sell and next year another 8,000 come in. This time around you may only sell 500 because you overpriced and exhausted the market the previous year. This is a… Read more »

Capn Dad
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Capn Dad

Outrageous pricing and bureaucratic nutroll. I’ll pass.

Pete
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Pete

Yes, they’ve lost their minds, and they appear to be on a power trip. There are better values at gun shows, gun stores, and even on Gunbroker. Kelly needs to check his too. People don’t buy surplus military firearms solely for marksmanship training. That’s available through the NRA and its affiliates. As far as the Philippines made 1911s are concerned, I fired one for a friend (who knew I was on my way to a range). It shot fine. But there is the suspicion within certain knowledgeable circles that the metallurgy is a bit undependable with high volume use on… Read more »

HankB
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HankB

If it were – somehow – possible to get the Ithaca pistol my Dad carried during WWII, I’d spend the money. But even if it still exists, that pistol’s serial number is long lost to history. Spending a grand for an old beater? Uh uh. If you shop around a little, for the price of a service grade CMP gun you can get a very nice modern 1911, which is likely to be more accurate, reliable, and have a better trigger, making it a better shooter overall. And you can get it without all the additional bureaucratic hoops of a… Read more »

Kelly
Guest
Kelly

Have they lost their mind ? Unless I am missing something here at the prices listed in the article why would anyone buy these ? I think like so many aspects of our government, the CMP has lost their way. By definition the CMP is to promote marksmanship not collectors. When you can buy a Rock Island Armory 1911 for 450.00 these should be below 300.00 esp when you consider that Rack Grade is not shootable as it is.

Tom
Guest
Tom

Kelly I totally agree with you. I think this is just way for CMP make excessive amounts of money, in other words rip us off.

No one of consequence
Guest
No one of consequence

The two reasons given justify why a NICS check is performed by CMP. They do not justify a second check and delivery to an FFL as opposed to the buyer, as is done with rifles.

In all, the CMP 1911s seem too much of a hassle and price. My father was in WWII and carried a 1911, so I’d like to have one in his memory; but I know what he would have said at both the price and the hoops to be jumped through.