AIWB (Appendix, Inside the Waistband) Carry & Unintentional Discharges ~ VIDEO

Opinion

Ft Collins, CO –-(Ammoland.com)- AIWB (Appendix, Inside the Waistband) Carry:

A current, widely-circulated video purports to display a surveillance-camera scenario depicting a man who holsters a pistol (reported to be a G43) in an AIWB holster (reported to be manufactured by G-Code). Seconds later, the man bends-over in order to pick something up from the floor. When he does, the pistol discharges with his hands nowhere near it.

He is reported to have been struck in the groin as a result.

Unfortunately, important details are missing (as they usually are with this kind of “evidence”):

(1) We don’t get to know whom these people are, nor where, nor when, this UD is supposed to have happened.

(2) We don’t even get to know if this video is “real,” or staged.

(3) Assuming the event is real, we don’t know if the pistol, nor the holster, in question are stock, or had been “modified.”

(4) We also don’t get to know if foreign objects (shirt-tails, lanyards) were present in the holster, or inside the pistol’s trigger-guard.

So, it is difficult for me to specifically comment on this “event,” except for the following general advice on AIWB holsters:

The single most dangerous thing any of us do with pistols, by far, is placing them into holsters!

“Holstering” is the one place where the vast majority of UDs happen! Most don’t involve personal injury and thus are never reflected on any statistic.

I’ve been asked to consult on any number of these UD (unintentional discharges) cases. Sometimes, I have no explanation! The other 99% of the time, the gun-handler had his finger on the trigger, but of course, has since developed amnesia.

(1) “Appendix carry” is preferred currently, particularly among women, so much so that its decline in popularity is unlikely any time soon! We Instructors have to confront, and deal with it. We provide our students with reasonable, sound (but never perfect) advice.

(2) Any hammer-fired pistol that is carried concealed (any style) should not have a spur on the hammer. Hammer-spurs on such pistols need the attention of a grinding-wheel.

(3) Any who carry AIWB (or AOWB for that matter) need to be particularly careful when holstering, insuring the muzzle-path is clear of body parts in the process. Shirt-tails, pull-lanyards (particularly with toggles), and anything else that can fit inside the trigger-guard need to be carefully noted and eliminated when possible.

(4) Who carry appendix-style (AIWB or AOWB) should not holster a pistol while they are in a sitting position.

(5) A persuasive argument can be made for grip-safeties and manual-safeties, when pistols are carried appendix-style.

(6) False “solutions,” like carrying with an empty chamber, or not carrying at all, manufacture more problems than they solve.

I don’t think it is possible to handle deadly weapons “safely.” I think we can handle them carefully.

Still, no “guarantees” attach!

/John

Defense Training International, Inc

About John Farnam & Defense Training International, Inc
As a defensive weapons and tactics instructor John Farnam will urge you, based on your own beliefs, to make up your mind in advance as to what you would do when faced with an imminent lethal threat. You should, of course, also decide what preparations you should make in advance if any. Defense Training International wants to make sure that their students fully understand the physical, legal, psychological, and societal consequences of their actions or in-actions.

It is our duty to make you aware of certain unpleasant physical realities intrinsic to the Planet Earth. Mr. Farnam is happy to be your counselor and advisor. Visit: www.defense-training.com

  • 41 thoughts on “AIWB (Appendix, Inside the Waistband) Carry & Unintentional Discharges ~ VIDEO

    1. I would have been whipping my pants down to see the damage and trying to stop bleeding.
      Then again, I don’t carry appendix. 3-4 o’clock, the most I’ll lose is a bit of butt cheek.
      I carry a g43 a lot. I place it in the holster, then stick it in my pants. Safer.

    2. The 2nd Law:
      Never Point The Gun At Something You Are Not Prepared To Destroy
      Remembering the first rule, The Gun Is ALWAYS Loaded, you should never point it toward anything that you are not prepared to destroy.

      Maybe pointing a pistol at your junk is natures way cleaning the gene pool…just sayin’

    3. I don’t think it was fake.
      1. The woman was working on something else in the back counter with the gloves on. She wasn’t “ready with gloves” because of the accidental shooting.
      2. The older man was dialing on his phone, likely to call EMT.
      3. The older man, the woman, and the dog all jump at precisely the same time; when the gun went off.

    4. Muzzle Flesh
      Unless the chamber is empty, if re – holstering requires me to point the muzzle at flesh, my thumb will be on the “Polish Calvary” style hammer of a “Slickslide” DAO (ie: Beretta: 92/96 D, PX4K; H&K: LEM; SIG: DAK, P2022d, P250, etc.).

    5. Muzzle Flesh
      Unless the chamber is empty, if re – holstering requires me to point the muzzle at flesh, my thumb will be on the “Polish Calvary” style hammer of a “Slickslide” DAO (ie: Beretta: 92/96 D, PX4K; HK: LEM; SIG: DAK, P2022, P250, etc.).

    6. How a Glock works. Sorry guys. No way a Glock just goes off without your booger hooks on the trigger. Maybe with modified internals but not a stock Glock.

      1. Ben thanks for uploading that – I have always wanted to see a pic of the firing pin safety in action as that has been the worry of many in carrying a round in the chamber. GOD Bless.

    7. Maybe the video was a reenactment of what actually happened. A few days ago an FBI agent that was dancing did a flip and his Glock came loose and fell to the floor and discharged. I think one person was hit in the leg. I have never tried doing a flip while carrying, maybe I won’t.

    8. The grind the hammer spur off comment is ridiculous.
      Empty chamber carry does have a place, especially in appendix carry.
      External thumb safeties and grip safeties are also a great idea.
      I carry my gun every day and an empty chamber gun CANNOT go off
      I accept that I need 2 hands and another second to get my gun into the fight.
      The extra safety is worth it to me

        1. WRONG! Docduracoat “accepts” things that he MAY end up regretting when the time comes. It is too late to try to chamber a round when there is a gun in your face; and what makes you think you’ll have both hands free when necessary to chamber a round? Learn from idiots who did stupid shit!

          1. @Rattler, I an not a fan of empty chambers either, but if a revolver, then just keep working the trigger, and if a semi-auto learn a one hand loading technique and work the trigger … if one just can’t stand the idea of having a loaded chamber.
            As I generally say, however, if it is your gunfight, then you fight it your way.

      1. You are right…an empty chamber cannot go off, no matter how badly you need it to save your life. Carrying an unloaded gun is dumb. If you can’t carry a loaded gun safely, then don’t carry one at all.

      2. Empty chamber = empty brain. NEVER, EVER carry ANY pistol with an empty chamber, period, end of story. P.S. Firearm safety resides BETWEEN YOUR EARS; not on the presence of a thumb or grip safety.

    9. Look Close at the Photo ,
      The Women on the Right is Already
      Wearing Surgical Gloves !
      Plus the Targets Up on the Left Wall !
      Totally Staged ! Probably by a Competing
      Holster Manufacturer .

      1. Look carefully – no blood. There should be at least minor dripping down his pant leg onto the floor, but there is none. This is fake.

        1. Not entirely accurate. Through and through bullet wounds from a small caliber munition may not bleed right away and sometimes bleed very little. Now, had he hit an artery there would have been blood everywhere immediately. This guy reacted with shock, tossing his gun and immediately dropping his pants to assess the damage. The video wasn’t long enough to really assess the damage. Because of the close range blood may have been more present at the exit wound which was blocked from view of the camera.

    10. I don’t usually disagree with John but this is one of those cases. When someone asks my advice about appendix carry the advice is “don’t do it.” I know it is increasing in popularity but that is no reason to endorse the practice. When a competent instructor sees a person doing something that is unsafe, or more unsafe than needs to be, the advice should be, don’t do it. If I tell a person to do this, that or another thing, they own me. From that point on there is a risk that the person will screw up and then claim “Joe told me to do it.” As instructors we have an obligation to opt out of an activity, or advice, we feel does not serve the person’s, or our, best interest.

    11. This has to be staged. Take a look again at the video. When the gun suppose ably discharges, no one seems to hear it as everyone seems to act like nothing happened. The female walks around the outside of the area instead of heading straight to the supposed victim.

    12. I carry an HK P30sk (V3, no manual safety) appendix, and have for some time. I seat the gun in the holster by pushing down on the hammer; if the trigger were to ever snag on anything, the hammer cannot move to the cocked position and then fire. I don’t understand why the author says, nor see a need, to grind down the hammer spur, either. The lack of a manual safety is the reason I haven’t picked up a VP9sk or similar ‘trigger only’ safety pistol. To each their own, but I wouldn’t carry a 1911 cocked and unlocked, and feel the same way about striker-fire guns with no manual safety. Whether or not this video was staged, ND’s like this do happen, and while appendix carry offers some huge benefits and advantages over other types of carry, there are very serious risks involved that can be mitigated by picking the right gun, proper holster, and having good trigger awareness.

      1. Buying and using a pistol that doesn’t have a safety is just asking for trouble. People buy Clock’s and others like style and those not use to pistols even cops wind up hurt.

        1. So, for some reason you think cops are more qualified just because thay are a cop? You’re a special kind of dumb.

        2. The safety on ANY firearm is BETWEEN THE EARS OF THE OPERATOR; not on ANY manual ‘safety’ mechanism. Any other attitude is just asking for trouble.

    13. Glock leg, now Glock groin? How come we never hear about Springfield leg?

      BTW, another site reported that the guy went to the hospital, so I doubt that this was staged.

        1. I agree with you on the XD’s, I have several and love them,XD9, XDm9,XD40,andXD45Tactical.
          Never had a ND with any of them. Before acquiring the springfields I carried s Beretta 92 for about 12 years. No problem with it either. Had a DPS friend that was extatic about glocks. Shot himself in the
          calf of the leg.Didn’t affect his opinion of glocks.

          1. Why should it? OFF TARGET, OFF TRIGGER would have solved any problem he had with ANY handgun. Firearm safety resides BETWEEN THE EARS OF THE OPERATOR; not with any mechanical safety mechanism.

    14. “(2) Any hammer-fired pistol that is carried concealed (any style) should not have a spur on the hammer. Hammer-spurs on such pistols need the attention of a grinding-wheel.” You lost me at this one. So the author – as an ‘expert’ and instructor, is telling me to grind the hammer spur off of my 1911? And P226? If I were in a class where the instructor said that, I would leave and get my money back.

      1. Not to mention grinding off the hammer on a revolver frequently causes light strikes on the primer; causing misfires. Speaking of misfires, who in the world would EVER hire John Farnam for any reason whatsoever? In the words of Bugs Bunny: ‘What a maroon!’

    15. Still can’t understand why everybody wants to carry a gun shoved down their pants, muzzle pointed at the family jewels! Something like this is bound to happen. I don’t think it’s staged, many people shoot themselves and still stay on their feet. I am retired LEO and have carried OWB my whole career without having to shove my pistol down my pants! Will never carry this way!

      1. I am also a retired LEO and am very comfortable with MOB (middle of back) carry inside my pants. But I learned ‘off target, off trigger’ years and years ago so no, it is not ‘bound to happen’. Your training might have been different. ‘A man has got to know his limitations’ – Clint Eastwood as Dirty Harry.

    16. Looks like a staged video. If the individual had actually been shot in the groin area as depicted in the video, he would not be standing on his feet, much less being so calm about it.

      1. @Bill, Yes, at most this is an F6 source. Funny how the fellow in the background just keeps on filling boxes, without having any reaction to the supposed discharge sound. Curious.

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