Mexican Wolf Recovery Program Monthly Update – December 1-31, 2018

Mexican Wolf
Mexican Wolf Recovery Program Monthly Update – December 1-31, 2018

ARIZONA -(Ammoland.com)- Due to the federal government shutdown, updates for the month of December were only available for Arizona and the FAIR. Program updates for New Mexico from the month of December were not available from the USFWS at the time this report was prepared.

The following is a summary of Mexican Wolf Reintroduction Project (Project) activities in the Mexican Wolf Experimental Population Area (MWEPA) in Arizona, including the Fort Apache Indian Reservation (FAIR), San Carlos Apache Reservation (SCAR), and New Mexico. Additional program information can be obtained by calling (928) 339-4329 or toll free at (888) 459-9653, or by visiting the Arizona Game and Fish Department website at
azgfd.gov/wolf or by visiting the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service website at fws.gov/southwest/es/mexicanwolf. For information on the FAIR call (928) 338-4385 ext. 226 or visit wmatoutdoors.org

Past updates may be viewed on these websites. Interested parties may sign up to receive this update electronically by visiting azgfd.com and clicking on the E-news Signup tab on the top left corner of the webpage.

This update is a public document and information in it can be used for any purpose. The Mexican Wolf Recovery Program is a multi-agency cooperative effort among the Arizona Game and Fish Department (AZGFD), USDA Forest Service (USFS), USDA-Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service, Wildlife Services (USDA-APHIS WS), U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) and the White Mountain Apache Tribe (WMAT).

To view semi-monthly wolf location information please visit http://arcg.is/0iGSGH.

Please report any wolf sightings or suspected livestock depredations to: the Alpine wolf office at (928) 339-4329, Pinetop wolf office at (928) 532-2391 or toll free at (888) 459-9653. For sightings or suspected depredations on the FAIR, please call the FAIR wolf office in Whiteriver at (928) 388-4385 ext. 226. To report incidents of take or harassment of wolves, please call the AZGFD 24-hour dispatch (Operation Game Thief) at (800) 352-0700.

Overall Mexican Wolf Recovery Program Monthly Update

Due to the federal government shutdown, updates for the month of December were only available for Arizona and the FAIR at the time this report was prepared.

Numbering System: Mexican wolves are given an identification number recorded in an official studbook that tracks their history. Capital letters (M = Male, F = Female) preceding the number indicate adult animals 24 months or older. Lower case letters (m = male, f = female) are used to indicate wolves younger than 24 months. A lower case letter “p” preceding the number is used to indicate a wolf pup born in the most recent spring. The capital letter “A” preceding the letter and number indicate breeding wolves.

Definitions: A “wolf pack” is defined as two or more wolves that maintain an
established territory. In the event that one of the two alpha (dominant) wolves dies, the remaining alpha wolf, regardless of pack size, retains the pack status. The packs referenced in this update contain at least one wolf with a radio telemetry collar attached to it. Studbook numbers listed in the monthly update denote wolves with functioning radio collars. The Interagency Field Team (IFT) recognizes that wolves without radio telemetry collars may also form packs. If the IFT confirms that wolves are associating with each other and are resident within the same home range, they will be referenced as a pack.

CURRENT POPULATION STATUS

The year-end minimum population count for 2017 was 114 wolves in the wild in Arizona and New Mexico. Annual surveys are conducted in the winter as this is when the population experiences the least amount of natural fluctuation (i.e. in the spring the population increases dramatically with the birth of new pups and declines throughout the summer and fall as pup mortality generally occurs in this period). Thus, the IFT summarizes the total number of wolves in the winter at a fairly static or consistent time of year. Counting the population at the end of each year allows for comparable year-to-year trends at a time of year when the Mexican wolf population is most stable. Year-end population counts for 2018 continued during the month of December.

IN ARIZONA:

Bear Wallow Pack (collared AM1338 and f1683)
In December, the IFT documented the Bear Wallow Pack in their territory on the east central portion of the Apache-Sitgreaves National Forest (ASNF) and occasionally on the SCAR and the FAIR. Yearling f1683 and AM1338 were documented traveling separately.

Bluestem Pack (collared f1686)
In December, the IFT documented yearling f1686 making dispersal movements from the pack’s territory within the eastern portion of the ASNF.

Eagle Creek Pack (collared M1477)
In December, the IFT continued to document M1477 traveling with an uncollared wolf in a territory in the east central portion of the ASNF.

Elk Horn Pack (collared AF1294, f1668, m1671, mp1695, fp1696, and fp1697)
In December, the Elk Horn Pack was located within their traditional territory in the northeastern portion of the ASNF. The IFT continued to maintain a diversionary food cache to reduce the potential for human-wildlife interactions near residences. The IFT conducted hazing efforts on the Elk Horn Pack on one occasion when the pack was located in the community of Alpine. Male mp1695 was documented traveling separate from the rest of the pack in New Mexico.

Hoodoo Pack (collared AM1290, AF1333, m1677, m1681, and mp1789)
In December, the Hoodoo Pack was located within their traditional territory in the northeastern portion of the ASNF. Yearling, m1677 was documented traveling separate from the rest of the pack in the east central portion of the ASNF. Male mp1789 was documented making dispersal movements from the pack’s territory in the east central part of the ANSF in December.

Pine Spring Pack (collared AM1394, AF1562, fp1794, and fp1825)
In December, the Pine Spring Pack was located within their territory in the north central portion of the ASNF and occasionally in the north eastern portion of the FAIR. The IFT continued to maintain a diversionary food cache for this pack to reduce potential for wolf-livestock conflict.

Prime Canyon Pack (collared AM1471, AF1488, mp1790, fp1791, and fp1823)
In December, the IFT documented the Prime Canyon Pack within their territory in the east central portion of the ASNF. The IFT maintained a diversionary food cache for this pack to reduce the potential for human-wildlife interactions near residences.

Saffel Pack (collared AM1441, AF1567, and fp1792)
In December, the Saffel Pack was located in their territory in the northeastern portion of the ASNF. Yearling m1661 was found dead in AZ; the incident is currently under investigation.

Sierra Blanca Pack (collared M1571 and F1550)
In December, the Sierra Blanca Pack was located in their territory in the northeastern portion of the ASNF.

Single collared F1489
In December, the IFT documented F1489 traveling in the north and east central portion of the ASNF.

Single collared M1574
In December, the IFT documented M1574 traveling in the east central portion of the ASNF, the SCAR, and the eastern portion of the FAIR.

Single collared AM1382
In December, the IFT documented AM1382 traveling in the east central portion of the ASNF.

ON THE FAIR:

Baldy Pack (collared AM1347 and F1560)
In December, the Baldy Pack was documented traveling in the eastern portion of the FAIR and the north central portion of the ASNF.

Maverick Pack (collared AF1291 and fp1828)
In December, the Maverick Pack was located within their traditional territory in the eastern portion of the FAIR and east central portion of the ASNF.

Tsay-O-Ah Pack (collared M1559, AF1283 and f1674)
In December, the Tsay-O-Ah Pack was located within their traditional territory in the eastern portion of the FAIR. They were occasionally documented traveling in the east central portion of the ASNF. M1559, from the Tu dil hil Pack, has been documented traveling with the Tsay-O-Ah Pack since September 2018 and is now considered part of the Tsay-O-Ah Pack.

Single collared F1679
In December, F1679 of the Tu dil hil Pack was documented traveling in the eastern portion of the FAIR.

Single collared M1824
In December, M1824 was documented traveling in the eastern portion of the FAIR, north central and north eastern portions of the ASNF and the northwestern portion of the Gila National Forest in New Mexico.

IN NEW MEXICO:

Updates for wolf packs in New Mexico from the month of December were not available from the USFWS at the time this report was prepared due to the federal government shutdown.

MORTALITIES

During the month of December, yearling m1661 of the Saffel Pack was located dead in Arizona. The incident is under investigation. December mortality data for New Mexico was not available from the USFWS at the time this report was prepared due to the federal shutdown.

INCIDENTS

During the month of December, there were no confirmed wolf depredation incidents on livestock in Arizona. There was one nuisance incident in Arizona. December depredation and nuisance data for New Mexico was not available from the USFWS at the time this report was prepared due to the federal shutdown.

On December 8, the IFT hazed the Elk Horn Pack after locating the wolves in an open pasture in Alpine, AZ near residences.

On December 5, WMAT investigated a dead calf on the FAIR. The investigation determined the calf was a confirmed dog kill.

COMMUNICATION AND COORDINATION

There were no communication/coordination updates from Arizona during the month of December.

PROJECT PERSONNEL

In December, Emily Schafsteck and Jared Black joined the Mexican Wolf Recovery Program to work for the Arizona Game and Fish Department as wolf technicians. Welcome Jared and Emily.

REWARDS OFFERED

The USFWS is offering a reward of up to $10,000; the AZGFD Operation Game Thief is offering a reward of up to $1,000; and the NMDGF is offering a reward of up to $1,000 for information leading to the conviction of the individual(s) responsible for the shooting deaths of Mexican wolves. A variety of non-governmental organizations and private individuals have pledged an additional $46,000 for a total reward amount of up to $58,000, depending on the information provided.

Individuals with information they believe may be helpful are urged to call one of the following agencies: USFWS special agents in Mesa, Arizona, at (480) 967-7900, in Alpine, Arizona, at (928) 339-4232, or in Albuquerque, New Mexico, at (505) 346-7828; the WMAT at (928) 338-1023 or (928) 338-4385; AGFD Operation Game Thief at (800) 352-0700; or NMDGF Operation Game Thief at (800) 432-4263. Killing a Mexican wolf is a violation of the Federal Endangered Species Act and can result in criminal penalties of up to $50,000, and/or not more than one year in jail, and/or a civil penalty of up to $25,000.

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    NottinghilltomcatWild BillGreg KThe Green Watch Dog Recent comment authors
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    tomcat
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    tomcat

    Yea right, go tame ne of these wolfs and bring it into your house to spend the night, they are just like puppy dogs. I might warn you not to close both eyes during the night because you will be dinner. For those who have to put up with these predators the old saying shoot, shovel and shut up sounds like the way to protect yourself and your property.

    Nottinghill
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    Nottinghill

    @willy d.: I have told alot of city friends about wolves. I first state that they are not cute and cuddly. I ask if they’ve ever seen one in real life. The answer is always no. Next I tell them if/when you see one you WILL know it… and you WILL NOT be thinking >>>it’s a dog.

    willy d
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    willy d

    The problem with the goody two shoes is that they are far enough in the city that it won’t effect them any time soon another we know what’s good for you and you don’t have any say in it!!!!!! Just see where the Wolf’s, Elk, Coyote, have taken us to the general population, even in state parks, we have had attacks, but the goody two shoes will never put that out there as it doesn’t fit their agenda!!!!!!!! What they don’t understand is the closer you get wild life to suburbia the more the chance of conflict with humans and… Read more »

    The Green Watch Dog
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    The Green Watch Dog

    The reality Will is that for almost a 100 years, only 2 human beings have died by these beautiful animals, and their deaths are questionable at that! I suggest you look out for bad and mean dogs that kill and injure. Another good idea would be to have a plastic motorized predator you can shoot at on Saturdays in order to satisfy you hunting needs.

    Nottinghill
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    Nottinghill

    The ‘Green Rat Fink’ squeaks again!!!!!!!!!

    Wild Bill
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    Wild Bill

    @Not, Yeah, he must really hate deer, elk, and every other creature. He thinks that wolves can balance wild populations, better than a hunter’s discretion, so that man would have no need of a gun. GRF is so superficial.

    250 savage guy
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    250 savage guy

    The big city animal worshiping cults want wolves in all 48 states! They talk like wolves are puppy dogs and are harmless to humans. Wolves kill deer, elk and cattle, what makes them think they wouldn’t kill a human? During WW2, wolves attacked and killed people hiding in the woods in Europe. Some places, troops had to be called out to kill wolves. This is another way for hunting banning groups to stop hunting by saying hunters are killing the wolves prey. Wolves tear a prey apart, it’s not a pretty sight. But these wolf worshippers paint a “romantic” picture… Read more »

    Greg K
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    Greg K

    During the last scoping hearing in WA State, which was moved from the West Coast to Spokane, where it belonged, I attended. There was a Public Comment to begin around 2:30pm, however the people on the Committee decided to tell us all about their qualifications instead. This is no joke; there was a guy about 28 years old, who spent about 45 minutes declaring his glory. He kept saying the same crud over and over…It was clearly a stalling technique. I was 40something at the time, a machinist/mechanic with a racing background, Caterpillar filed a patent by my design and… Read more »

    Nottinghill
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    Nottinghill

    Send all commies to roam the Nat’l Forests in the fall/winter for statistical data and information for FREE… meaning they must pay for all supplies and their own way. Free to the American Taxpayer!
    A ‘Fink’s’ wetdream. It’s free so stand in line.

    Nottinghill
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    Nottinghill

    Hey Trump could use the wolves for a barrier by placing them all in a chain-linked gated area 1000yds from the border along the 1200 mile border line. Keep them hungry let them catch all those that come over the current wall.
    Call it ‘The Wolf Wall’.
    Anyone makes it pass or kills a wolf will get the following…
    Killing a Mexican wolf is a violation of the Federal Endangered Species Act and can result in criminal penalties of up to $50,000, and/or not more than one year in jail, and/or a civil penalty of up to $25,000.