Smith Battleplan Folding Knife ~ Review

Smith Battleplan Folding Knife ~ Review
Smith Battleplan Folding Knife ~ Review. If you’re looking for an EDC in which the thumb studs and flipper work, check out the Smith’s Battleplan knife.

Idaho – -(AmmoLand.com)- I recently received a Smith’s Battleplan Knife to test. Right away I must point out two features that work, unlike a significant majority of other knives that I test.

The thumb studs and the flipper pop the blade out in record time. Maybe I’m not coordinated, but most of the knives with thumb studs that I test are semi non-functional. The studs are not mounted far enough down the blade to get leverage, and a lot of the flippers are too short to be functional. Both items work great on the Smith’s Battleplan Knife. In fact, there are slight indentations for the thumb to slide into place to access the thumb studs.

Smith Battleplan Folding Knife

So due to the above two functional features I automatically like the knife. Now to move on. I’ve grown fond of textured G10 handles. I feel like I have a firm grip on them and they appear to be durable. Not that popularity means that it is right, but I sure do see G10 material being used for a lot of knife handles.

Next feature-the pocket clip is reversible which it hasn’t been the case on the other Smith’s knives that I have tested so far. This is good as it will appeal to our left-handed brothers. It utilizes a liner locking system which is the only flaw that I see in the knife. Not that I don’t like liner locks, but this one doesn’t position into the middle of the blade but barely clings to the outside corner of the hilt of the blade.

I don’t know if I can verbalize what I’m about to try to say, but I’ll try. I am out of town as I write this, so I don’t have a screwdriver with me, so I stuck a butter knife in to bend the liner lock over a little more. That’s when I noticed that the backside of the blade is slightly angled. I assume to allow the liner lock to activate but after it barely engages the angle goes in which restricts the liner lock from progressing any further. I think if I can find a super small file and slip it in between the handles that I can slightly file the butt of the blade angle down slightly so the liner lock will progress over another 1/64th inch, which will move it to the center of the blade which will provide for a lot better stability. Or maybe I ought to say better insurance against it slipping and letting the blade close on your hand. It this works, then it will provide for a more stable lock.

Smith Battleplan Folding Knife
Smith Battleplan Folding Knife

Another favorite feature is that it has a slot in the back so you can attach a lanyard if so desired. And it is an open side knife which allows for super easy cleaning., which is a big deal if you slice sausage, cheese, etc. with your EDC.

I have the Smith’s Battleplan Knife (Black), but it also comes in Desert Tan and OD Green. Mine did not come from the factory exceptionally sharp, but that’s no big deal. I can sharpen a knife.

So in a nutshell, I like the knife and would recommend it for an EDC. Especially since it comes with an MSRP of $34.99. And as usual, we will close with the specs.

Smith Battleplan Folding Knife SPECS:

  • 2.78” 420 Stainless black blade
  • Ambidextrous thumb studs
  • Reversible pocket clip
  • G10 handle
  • Lanyard hole
  • Liner lock
  • 7.85” overall length when open



Tom Claycomb
Tom Claycomb

About Tom Claycomb

Tom Claycomb has been an avid hunter/fisherman throughout his life as well as an outdoors writer with outdoor columns in the magazine Hunt Alaska, Bass Pro Shops, Bowhunter.net and freelances for numerous magazines and newspapers. “To properly skin your animal you will need a sharp knife. I have an e-article on Amazon Kindle titled Knife Sharpening for $.99 if you’re having trouble.”

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Van

SMH LOL. This is like Cosmo reviewing Burnett’s vodka and saying it is an excellent choice for the dieting drinker and it even comes with a glass bottle!

Conrad

Man Tom, why would you attempt to legitimize a knife that at first take appears to be a Smith and Wesson, but on a closer look is just a Chinese Smith. Most knives at the last gun and knife show I attended were cheap Chinese junk, cheap enough in some cases to buy 10 for the price of 1 original. I think a modicum of dignity is needed when posting knife reviews and that inherently means selecting knives of value, not simply convenience. If we did that the junk would go away. But maybe I’m wrong, and the scrapple should… Read more »

David

As for the writer out of town talking about the end of the blade stock being angled, it is supposed to be that way. It keeps the liner lock from sliding past the blade stock end and allowing the blade to still close. So if you still decide to file the blade stock flat, be sure keep sutures on hand ( no pun intended ) or plan on spending lots of time at the ER for stitches. So if you plan on filing the blade stock end down, be sure to keep the angle in tact for this reason.

Austin Miller III

Thanks for your evaluation of the knife. If I read your article right, the reason the liner lock barely moves behind the blade and there is an angle to the back of the blade is to account for wear. Over time, as you open and close the blade it will wear down the surface between the two and the liner lock will move slightly further in while holding the blade securely. If that is not there you will have a noticeably shorter useful life with the knife. If it doesn’t lock securely, it isn’t right.