Fight Gun Control With Our Own Emotional Stories

Opinion

Happy Gun Owner With Daughter On Shoulders
Fight Gun Control With Our Own Emotional Stories

United States – -(AmmoLand.com)- When we discussed the “civil society” gambit to ban modern multi-purpose semi-automatic firearms, we noted that it was being used to set up a one-two combination to get people to not look at the facts surrounding these firearms. The first part of that combination was massive amounts of emotional manipulation.

For instance, Kamala Harris used the victims of the Sandy Hook Elementary School shooting as pawns during her CNN town hall. Before that, there were the victims of Columbine, Las Vegas, Tucson, Virginia Tech, and just about any other mass shooting. Since then, they’ve used victims from Parkland.

Lives cut short, particularly young lives cut short, stir powerful emotions. For people in the short-term aftermath of a mass shooting, especially one involving the misuse of modern multi-purpose semi-automatic firearms, Justice Department statistics don’t matter in the immediate aftermath. The emotions are that raw.

Harris’s most egregious act of emotional manipulation was to say she would have required Senators and Congressmen to look at the autopsy photos from Sandy Hook while in a locked room before they voted on our Second Amendment rights.

She makes no bones that she will use emotion to try and trump facts. Sadly, that gambit works, especially when magnified by today’s media.

Second Amendment supporters now have to consider the fact that it may be time to consider fighting back on an emotional level to supplement the facts that are already on our side.

Now, some may think this is sinking to their level. The fact of the matter is, though, they have already been wielding it, the genie is out of the bottle. Unilateral disarmament is a bad idea, whether in the figurative sense of debate techniques or in the literal sense of gun-free zones.

Like it or not, we have to emotionally connect with people, especially those who are on the fence about our rights. Now, we have to be very careful how we do it, given the way the vast majority of media outlets are hostile to our efforts to defend the Second Amendment, but there are ways we can do so.

The first is to point to people who are responsible users. Fox News recently had the story of David Smith, a person who took up competitive shooting after being diagnosed with Parkinson’s Disease. One of the photos on the Fox News site shows Smith, who the report described as being excited about not seeing a special “disabled” category in his first match, holding a modern multi-purpose semi-automatic rifle. Smith, a man who has found a way to make a new career after a devastating diagnosis and who seeks to help others with what he calls “gun therapy,” would be just one of the people wrongfully punished by bans favored by the likes of Chris Murphy and Harris.

Then, there are the personal defense stories. Like the one involving Zachary Phillips in Broken Arrow, Oklahoma. Phillips and his father had their home invaded by three intruders armed with knives and brass knuckles (as an aside, knives kill four times as many people as rifles of any type). Phillips used an AR-15, perhaps the most prominent of the modern multi-purpose semi-automatic firearms that people like Murphy and Harris want to ban, to defend himself and his dad. The intruders were killed, and their getaway driver has been charged with murder. It would be interesting to see anti-Second Amendment extremists asked why they would leave good people like Mr. Phillips helpless in the face of intruders.

Finally, there are also the victims of laws that violate the Second Amendment. For instance, the case of Carol Bowne in New Jersey. She had broken up with her abusive boyfriend, who had a criminal record that included at least once felony. After that break-up, she applied for a pistol permit. New Jersey law says it should be granted within 30 days. Bowne had been waiting for six weeks when she was stabbed to death by her abusive ex, who had a warrant out for violating a restraining order. Perhaps, Kamala Harris, she should sit in a locked room with the autopsy photos of Ms. Bowne and read the police reports before she pushes her anti-Second Amendment agenda.

We have the facts on our side, but the other side is using emotion to get people to ignore them. Perhaps it is time to start generating some emotion of our own. We didn’t ask for that kind of fight, but we may have to get used to fighting it.


Harold Hu, chison

About Harold Hutchison

Writer Harold Hutchison has more than a dozen years of experience covering military affairs, international events, U.S. politics and Second Amendment issues. Harold was consulting senior editor at Soldier of Fortune magazine and is the author of the novel Strike Group Reagan. He has also written for the Daily Caller, National Review, Patriot Post, Strategypage.com, and other national websites.

  • 9 thoughts on “Fight Gun Control With Our Own Emotional Stories

    1. I had an occasion that happened similar to Witold. The phone rang one evening, last winter, and it was my neighbor across the road. He said that a female knocked on his door and asked if he would come and pull them out. They had gotten stuck, flat ground and no snow. My neighbor refused to help and told her to leave. It wasn’t long after that someone came to my front door so I retrieved my carry gun and started to the door. My dogs were really carrying on and someone that could not see them would have thought twice before coming through the door. The man in this couple was the one who came to my house and he turned and left when he heard the dogs. I wasn’t going to shoot while he was walking away and I wasn’t about to go where they said they got stuck, so I called the sheriff’s department and in about five minutes they were there.It turns out the old truck was stuck and they got it out and they went on their way but I was not willing to risk my existence to find out. Thirty or fourty years ago would have been a different story. That was long before today’s democrat party, Obama or the metoo movement.

    2. Mamma and Daddy always said….Better to have and not need than to need and not have.
      They’ve been gone ten and thirteen years respectively, and they still get smarter every year….as the politicians get dumber and more threatening to our freedoms and safety..

    3. Wanting to tell your stories is absolutely a good thing !! The only problem is that they will not get the coverage from any news channels because the news channels have been one sided with guns for as long as I can remember!! Remember people like blumeberg pay these news stations to NOT report anything good about how guns help or save people.

      But any good coverage about how guns save people is a good thing! Hopefully no one will ever have to find out what it’s like !!
      Stay safe!!!

      1. So nice to see that you live nice and safe inside your protective bubble. But someday you are going to run out of air and something bad will happen to you. Chances are not always in your favor. It’s like buying insurance; you just never know. “Nothing ever happens” until it HAPPENS. That’s kinda how it works.

      2. They are not ‘Potential intruders’, the paperboy or the UPS driver have legitimate business coming to your home. A ‘Potential intruder’ is the guy trying to jimmy open the window in the spare bedroom of my mothers house. She told him she was going to shoot him when he got the window open and he ran off. It took the PD over 20 minutes to respond to her 911 call.

      3. @Clark Kent, you really are a dumb-ass. It was 1 AM on a dark, back country road. The legitimate people that come onto my property, like my postal carrier, a paper boy, UPS or FEDEX, etc. come in the daytime during business hours. I don’t give a shit what anyone else thinks, uninvited in the dead of night at my door, the only thing that keeps an intruder “potential” is what side of the door they stay on.

        You want to go out and help someone in the middle of the night, knock yourself out. I am not AAA.

      4. @Clark, Your implied argument presumes that you know, in advance, the true nature of someone that dresses up to look like a UPS delivery driver or other workman. That is a presumption that one can not make. The stories of people trying to lure someone from the safety of their house are so abundant, as to be a profusion.

    4. My own personal defense story. I have related before here on Ammoland, so please forgive me if you’ve heard it before. No shots were fired, however, I believe the mere display of the fact that I was armed contributed to the positive outcome…..my wife, her brother, our dogs, and myself did not end up DEAD!

      My wife and I live in rural eastern CT with no town police department, only the
      six shift state troopers on patrol at any given time. On a good night,
      we can expect a trooper in 5 minutes at the latest, but during bad weather,
      trouble at the prisons or at UConn, we are basically on our own. Around
      10:30 PM on Christmas Eve 2012, I was called out with my local fire department
      for a one-car accident. While out at the scene, snow squalls passed through
      the area dropped less than an inch of snow, but slicked up the roads and
      caused many accidents. I got back home and into bed at 12:45 AM.

      At 1:00AM Christmas morning 2012, my wife and I were awakened by loud
      banging sounds. Our dogs were going berserk and my wife was frightened
      out of her wits. Her disabled brother was staying with us for the holiday,
      and she asked to make sure the noise was not him falling out of bed. As
      usual, he was in bed sound asleep and had heard nothing. I closed his bedroom
      door, and realized the sound was someone pounding on the front door, and
      I could tell there was someone out there. I went down stairs in my skivvies,
      holding my loaded Glock 21 and SureFire flashlight at the ready, and called
      out through the door for the person to identify himself. He stepped in front
      of the window where I was standing, and I blinded him with my light. He said
      his truck broke down at the end of my driveway (300′ away) and could I
      come out and help him. I told him to “get the [expletive] off my front porch!”
      He then starts to tell me he has kids in the truck, maybe I could give him
      some gas or something? I don’t have any idea who this character is, or if
      he is alone, but I do know I AM NOT going outside of my castle to see. I
      told him again to “get the [expletive] off my porch and leave the property!”
      He now sees my firearm and decides to leave. I watch until he disappears
      from view, and then I run around my home turning on every exterior light
      and double checking that every door is secure. Next I call 911 to get the
      CT State Police. I give them all the details (except the fact that I am
      armed and WILL dispatch this individual to God if he enters my home). They
      tell me that because of the snow squalls and multiple motor vehicle accidents
      they are attending to, they would get someone out as soon as they could.
      Needless to say, I was stunned. I have a potential intruder on my property,
      AT MY FRONT DOOR, and they thought dinking around with fender-benders was
      more important??? I calmly said, “thank you very much.” and hung up the phone.
      He never returned, and I never went back to sleep. At day light I went
      out to check things out while still armed. There were tracks from one vehicle
      at the foot of my driveway, and one set of foot prints in the snow to and
      from my house, so perhaps he was telling the truth. At 2:00 PM in the
      afternoon, I probably would’ve helped the guy out. But at 1:00 AM in the
      morning he was one false move away from two or three center mass HP hits.

      When we moved out here we kind of thought this is how police response
      would be. No state trooper ever showed up to my property for this call,
      even after the fact the next day. This confirmed it. I never go to bed
      without a loaded firearm close by, and usually have one handy around
      the house during the day. I carry just about every time I leave the house
      with few exceptions. People I know will ask “what are you afraid of?” I
      smile, pat my concealed firearm, and say “absolutely nothing, but I am
      prepared for anything.”

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