Hyde-Smith Highlights Extended Duck Hunting Season In Miss.

Senator Authored Law Giving States Right to Extend Federal Duck Hunting Season to Jan. 31.

Duck Hunting Hunter Decoys Water
Hyde-Smith Highlights Extended Duck Hunting Season In Miss.

WASHINGTON, D.C. – -(AmmoLand.com)- U.S. Senator Cindy Hyde-Smith (R-Miss.) today highlighted the approval of the 2019-2020 duck hunting season in Mississippi, which will extend to Jan. 31, 2020, as a result of a law change she authored.

Gone is the “last Sunday in January” deadline previously set by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service for duck hunting seasons across the nation. Through legislation authored by Hyde-Smith and signed into law in March, states now have the authority to extend duck hunting season to the end of January.

“I’m happy that Mississippi is taking advantage of the law to give sportsmen more time to enjoy duck hunting season. I’m particularly proud that special hunts have been scheduled for youth, veterans, and military personnel,” Hyde-Smith said.

 

U.S. Senator Cindy Hyde-Smith
U.S. Senator Cindy Hyde-Smith

The Mississippi Department of Wildlife, Fisheries, and Parks (MDWFP) recently issued its May 2019 newsletter that outlines the duck hunting dates extending to Jan. 31, 2020, in addition to two special hunt days in November and February for youth, veterans, and active military.

 

In March, President Trump signed the Natural Resources Management Act (Public Law 116-9), which included duck hunting provisions based on the Migratory Bird Framework and Hunting Opportunities for Veterans Act (S.2942), the first bill Hyde-Smith introduced as Mississippi’s U.S. Senator.

The MDWFP used the new law to set migratory bird hunting season dates that extend to January 31 and to establish special duck hunting dates for youths, veterans, and active duty military. In Mississippi, these hunts will be Nov. 16, 2019, and Feb. 8, 2020.

Hunting, fishing, and wildlife watching had a $2.7 billion economic impact in Mississippi in 2018, with $1.14 billion attributed to hunting alone, according to the Mississippi State University Division of Agriculture, Forestry, and Veterinary Medicine.


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