Fraud in Higher Education

Opinion

NTOA James Torkar Educational Scholarship Program
Fraud in Higher Education

USA – -(Ammoland.com)- This year's education scandal saw parents shelling out megabucks to gain college admittance for their children.

Federal prosecutors have charged more than 50 people with participating in a scheme to get their children into colleges by cheating on entrance exams or bribing athletic coaches. They paid William Singer, a college-prep professional, more than $25 million to bribe coaches and university administrators and to change test scores on college admittance exams such as the SAT and ACT. As disgusting as this grossly dishonest behavior is, it is only the tiny tip of fraud in higher education.

According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, in 2016, only 37% of white high school graduates tested as college-ready, but colleges admitted 70% of them. Roughly 17% of black high school graduates tested as college-ready, but colleges admitted 58% of them.

A 2018 Hechinger Report found, “More than four in 10 college students end up in developmental math and English classes at an annual cost of approximately $7 billion, and many of them have a worse chance of eventually graduating than if they went straight into college-level classes.”

According to the National Conference of State Legislatures, “when considering all first-time undergraduates, studies have found anywhere from 28 percent to 40 percent of students enroll in at least one remedial course. When looking at only community college students, several studies have found remediation rates surpassing 50 percent.” Only 25% of students who took the ACT in 2012 met the test's readiness benchmarks in all four subjects (English, reading, math and science).

It's clear that high schools confer diplomas that attest that a student can read, write and do math at a 12th-grade level when, in fact, most cannot. That means most high diplomas represent fraudulent documents. But when high school graduates enter college, what happens? To get a hint, we can turn to an article by Craig E. Klafter, “Good Grieve! America's Grade Inflation Culture,” published in the Fall 2019 edition of Academic Questions. In 1940, only 15% of all grades awarded were A's. By 2018, the average grade point average at some of the nation's leading colleges was A-minus. For example, the average GPA at Brown University (3.75), Stanford (3.68), Harvard College (3.63), Yale University (3.63), Columbia University (3.6), University of California, Berkeley (3.59).

The falling standards witnessed at our primary and secondary levels are becoming increasingly the case at tertiary levels. “Academically Adrift: Limited Learning on College Campuses” is a study conducted by Professors Richard Arum and Josipa Roksa. They found that 45% of 2,300 students at 24 colleges showed no significant improvement in “critical thinking, complex reasoning and writing by the end of their sophomore years.”

An article in News Forum for Lawyers titled “Study Finds College Students Remarkably Incompetent” cites a study done by the American Institutes for Research that revealed that over 75% of two-year college students and 50% of four-year college students were incapable of completing everyday tasks. About 20% of four-year college students demonstrated only basic mathematical ability, while a steeper 30% of two-year college students could not progress past elementary arithmetic. NBC News reported that Fortune 500 companies spend about $3 billion annually to train employees in “basic English.”

Here is a list of some other actual college courses that have been taught at U.S. colleges in recent years: “What If Harry Potter Is Real?” “Lady Gaga and the Sociology of Fame,” “Philosophy and Star Trek,” “Learning from YouTube,” “How To Watch Television,” and “Oh, Look, a Chicken!” The questions that immediately come to mind are these: What kind of professor would teach such courses, and what kind of student would spend his time taking such courses? Most importantly, what kind of college president and board of trustees would permit classes in such nonsense?

The fact that unscrupulous parents paid millions for special favors from college administrators to enroll their children pales in comparison to the poor educational outcomes, not to mention the gross indoctrination of young people by leftist professors.


Walter E.Williams
Walter E. Williams

About Walter E.Williams

Walter E. Williams is a professor of economics at George Mason University. Williams is also the author of several books. Among these are The State Against Blacks, later made into a television documentary, America: A Minority Viewpoint, All It Takes Is Guts, South Africa's War Against Capitalism, More Liberty Means Less Government, Liberty Versus The Tyranny of Socialism, and recently his autobiography, Up From The Projects.

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jack macCircle8Heed the Call-upHankusDubi Loo Recent comment authors
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Circle8
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Circle8

The schools are run by liberals, unions and democrats. Therein lies the problems. You will achieve nothing using morons to teach our young.

Hankus
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Hankus

And yet these same illiterate droolers are allowed to vote. I’m starting to have doubts about putting firearms into the hands of anyone brought up in the current public education system. I move that we change the legal age of adulthood to 30. Because that’s the reality now.

Heed the Call-up
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Heed the Call-up

Well, there used to be a literacy test for voting, and voting also, originally, used to be only for landowners. That is the problem, we allow everyone to vote, idiots, the insane, and Socialist Democrats. Well, the latter is the group name for the two former groups I identified.

There are many younger adults that are mature and able to function as adults, those are not the Socialist Democrats that are weakening our nation.

Dubi Loo
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Dubi Loo

Me thinks the real problem is schools spend too little time teaching the critical data needed in the real world and FAR too much time indoctrinating liberal stupidity; especially young children who are very susceptible to suggestion.

jack mac
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jack mac

Dubi Loo: The indoctrinating of young children you refer is imprinting. A more thorough brainwashing procedure. A procedure that is difficult to impossible to reverse. To make to heed specified authority is the purpose of mandatory attendance of schools by young children. This indoctrination is too often reinforced by post primary education institutions.

Finnky
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Finnky

Next thing you’ll be saying is that my undergrad university should never have offered their “underwater basket weaving” class. It was quite popular and only offered at a few inconvenient times – so I never managed to take it. Still wish I had, along with the PADI “underwater pumpkin carving” specialty course. Always have had a soft spot for ridiculous activities, particularly in school when they offered a break from my five hardcore courses. Anyone thinking they can build a useful degree from such fluff, deserves to live under a bridge with the rest of the uneducated. However we as… Read more »

Foe Pa
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Foe Pa

It is not public education that people such as myself oppose. What we oppose is the tenured world of self adulation and mutual appreciation that exists among academics in their sheltered little world. What we oppose are all the courses that are required in any field of study that are a waste of money and time and serve little purpose except to keep the academic in his opulent house and driving his Mercedes. It’s called job security and it needs to go away. Take away Federal funding where there is no academic achievement, abolish tenure and salary guarantees, and watch… Read more »

Finnky
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Finnky

@Foe Pa – Having spent a little time in academia, most federal funding is in the form of grants. I was in the sciences, and those grants are for research – to develop items the government wants (high power variable frequency lasers, or fundamental physics research). Can argue the usefulness of those particular studies, but the grants were only intended to fund teaching to extent necessary to retain graduate students as low-paid high-value grunt workers. That said, some profs did lead opulent lifestyles – paid through industrial consulting and/or commercial grants (from companies expecting to benefit from research). As a… Read more »

Foe Pa
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Foe Pa

The federal government gave $40 billion to public and private universities for research and development in 2017 alone. In addition we have federally backed student loans. Guaranteed student loans are Federal or state funded loans for students looking to finance their college education. They are distinct from personal, private or alternative loans in that they are backed by government funds. I have family in academia…Ph.d and double Ph.d as well as four children with degrees and I know that the money allocated for “research” has plenty of fat to be trimmed. The opulent lifestyles I have witnessed were not being… Read more »