Madison Man Sentenced to 2 Years for Gun Crime

Project Safe Neighborhoods
Project Safe Neighborhoods

MADISON, WIS. – -(AmmoLand.com)- Scott C. Blader, United States Attorney for the Western District of Wisconsin, announced that Travis Hicks, 24, Madison, Wisconsin, was sentenced today by Chief U.S. District Judge James D. Peterson to two years in federal prison for being a felon in possession of a firearm. Hicks pleaded guilty to this charge on October 9, 2019.

In 2013, Hicks was convicted of the felony crime of assault with a dangerous weapon. On October 4, 2018, Hicks was in Jackson, Michigan, with a friend and was shot at during a drive-by shooting. The friend returned fire and both fled the scene. Police arrested Hicks that day and found ammunition in his vehicle. Hicks was charged in state court in Michigan with being a felon in possession of ammunition and was released after posting bond on December 10, 2018. Hicks failed to appear at a hearing in the case on January 15, 2019, and a warrant was issued for his arrest.

On March 5, 2019, Hicks was arrested on the fugitive warrant in a Madison hotel room. In that room, law enforcement found a plastic box for a Glock 19 9mm pistol. A search warrant was executed on Hicks’ cell phone, and officers found videos of him holding a Maadi 7.62 caliber AK-47 type rifle and a Glock pistol. The investigation revealed that on January 22, 2019, while in Madison, Hicks possessed the Maadi rifle which he traded for a Glock 19 9mm pistol.

At sentencing, Judge Peterson said that when dealing with gun crimes, protection of the public is always the first concern. Judge Peterson noted that Hicks associates with people who use firearms and expressed concern that an innocent bystander could be shot in an exchange of gunfire. Because of that, Judge Peterson found that Hicks posed a risk to the public.

The charge against Hicks was the result of an investigation conducted by the Madison Police Department and Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives. The prosecution of the case has been handled by Assistant U.S. Attorney Corey Stephan.

This case has been brought as part of Project Safe Neighborhoods (PSN), the U.S. Justice Department’s program to reduce violent crime. The PSN approach emphasizes coordination between state and federal prosecutors and all levels of law enforcement to address gun crime, especially felons illegally possessing firearms and ammunition, and violent crimes and drug crimes that involve the use of firearms.

St. Paul Field Division


Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives ( ATF )Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives

ATF is the federal law enforcement agency responsible for investigating violations of the federal firearms and explosives laws and regulations. More information about ATF and its programs can be found at www.atf.gov.

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JohnBored
JohnBored
6 months ago

Title 18 Section 924(c) mandates a 5-year consecutive sentence.

Deplorable Bill
Deplorable Bill
6 months ago

The AVERAGE American citizen commits three felonies each day. I seriously doubt that this is done intentionally so I am not going to pick on anybody. Most of us have lived long enough to either have SEEN or watched on TV or listened on the radio of what I will call governmental overreach. I will all but guarantee you that if I had been responsible for the deaths of 93 people as we saw in Waco or the 2 at Ruby Ridge, I would be in jail for life or I would have already be dead because of the death… Read more »

Ej harbet
Ej harbet
6 months ago

What a nothing punishment! Seem to remember it was 5 years which with good boy time reduction would still be lenient.and he had priors.this is why we have repeat criminals! We should just allow judges to release on condition that if the convict reoffends the judge can push the covicts execution button or take his place in his grave! NEXT?

Don
Don
6 months ago

This thug deserved the jail time. I like that the feds are finally prosecuting felons.

Link
Link
6 months ago

Thanks ATF for showing that criminals will ignore laws over and over.
You have proven what the pro second ammendment people have been saying for years.
Criminals do not obey laws !!!

And good for going after them.
The guy hung out with others who were probably violent criminals, probably gang members as normal people don’t get shot at or in gun fights on the streets.
While you can not fully judge a person by who they hang with it does give a good example of who they are or what direction they are going in life.

Jeffersonian
6 months ago

Ammoland, stop posting press releases from the Einsatzgruppen!

jack mac
jack mac
6 months ago
Reply to  Jeffersonian

Jeffersonian: Our law making public servants are providing the ATF and other enforcement agencies with more authority to oppress than the Einsatzgruppen.
Their press releases provide some intell on their activities. It is worth having post here.

JPM
JPM
6 months ago

More ATF B.S. propaganda! If these ATF, incompetent, lying, thugs said it was daylight outside, I wouldn’t believe it until I could walk outside and see the sun. ANYTHING they are involved with, state, publish, print or support is automatically questionable given their log history of corruption, abuse and criminal behavior and total lack of accountability.

jack mac
jack mac
6 months ago
Reply to  JPM

JPM: Call ATF agents what you will, but recognize them as what they are. They are enforcers, hired by our law making public servants. Enforcers who comply with the orders of public servants.

joefoam
joefoam
6 months ago

Two points I took away from the article. Somehow criminals or restricted persons always get their hands on guns, so any attempt to prevent that is folly. Second, if the ATF would pursue and prosecute more felons breaking the law and put them behind bars maybe it would give pause to those thinking of breaking the law.

TheRevelator
TheRevelator
7 months ago

The most important question is why is the ATF, our self declared enemy, putting up their own propaganda spin on ammoland.

It seems to me they left out many details of his first case here. Now I dont have all the details, so Im not going to defend the guy. But I do wonder why no one else here is taking a step back that the ATF is now “authoring” articles here just like some other left wing pro gun control groups have tried to do before.

StreetSweeper
StreetSweeper
7 months ago

How on Earth did he pass a background check to get the Glock? Oh wait…

AZ Lefty
AZ Lefty
6 months ago
Reply to  StreetSweeper

Felon, Car Trunk Loophole

Deplorable Bill
Deplorable Bill
7 months ago

This is not going to be popular with everyone but; The man was convicted of assault with a dangerous weapon in 2013. It does not say what the sentence was. Jail time or probation for x amount of time/years. After accomplishing the sentence, he is a free man with a clean slate and NOBODY has the right to deny, deprive or delay him of his GOD given, unalienable, constitutionally protected RIGHT to keep and bear arms. He has the right to keep and bear arms. That includes the ammo for said arms. THE ACTUAL PEOPLE AT FAULT HERE ARE THE… Read more »

Will Flatt
Will Flatt
7 months ago

I would normally agree with you as I believe ALL gun laws are infringements, but given how high the recidivism rate is, I gotta say no. No guns for violent felons PERIOD. Note I say violent felons; because the antigun crowd wants to make EVERYTHING into a felony to systematically disarm Americans. The violent felons I used to lock up when I was a young sheepdog were 100% recidivist – straight to the bone. The law says we cannot lock up career criminals for longer than the law allows, and “3 strikes” legislation gets abused right away, as we’ve seen… Read more »

RoyD
RoyD
7 months ago
Reply to  Will Flatt

That’s the thing Will, almost everybody thinks that if you commit a crime, even a serious crime, that you automatically go to “the big house.” Nothing could be further from the truth except in extreme examples. But then people think television shows are an example of real life too. Ignorance abounds.

Heed the Call-up
Heed the Call-up
7 months ago
Reply to  Will Flatt

Will, I understand the sentiment about not “allowing” violent felons to own firearms. However, as you and the rest of have seen or know, even though they prohibited by law, just as this one in this story, they get them. Then the DAs and judges slap their wrists and say you were bad, and let them back on the streets to prey upon us. Prohibiting them from legal ownership does nothing to prevent them from obtaining, possessing, and using firearms. It’s not the firearm, weapon, fist, etc., that is illegal, but the criminal act. Weapon bans only impede legal ownership,… Read more »

Will Flatt
Will Flatt
7 months ago

@HTCU- We outlaw murder, too, but criminals still murder people. The prohibition against a violent felon doesn’t exist as a preventative measure no more than hiring police prevents crime generally. This is about enhancing penalties when prohibited persons (criminals) ignore the law and obtain firearms. It allows us to hold them in custody longer. Of course, you’re right that the system breaks down when corrupt cops, prosecutors and judges are lenient on evil people. But criminalizing firearm ownership against violent felons does not impede LAWFUL firearm ownership by peaceable Americans; it only allows for enhanced penalties when prohibited PEOPLE unlawfully… Read more »

Tionico
Tionico
6 months ago
Reply to  Will Flatt

Will, good points.. BUT once he had “paid his dues” on the first assault charge back in ’13, he SHOULD be free to live as the rest of us. If he could not be trusted in public with a gun at that time, WHY was he still not in the lockup, or on probation? We don’t know the details of that charge, either. The I am more than a little concerned about the drive by shooting he was involved in. No details. Apparently his companion in the car was providing the return fire, not him. HOW do we know his… Read more »

Arny
Arny
6 months ago
Reply to  Will Flatt

The dirty dozen comes to mind.

Vanns40
Vanns40
6 months ago
Reply to  Will Flatt

Will: Let me preface my remarks with the statement that I’m just a very old retired cop who has come to change his views, over the decades, on a lot of issues. Here goes: You’ve made a blanket statement about the high rate of recidivism, and that’s misleading. It’s not true in all areas of the country, not true of all felons, even former violent ones. And, there are a number of socio-economic factors which I won’t even begin to get into. The short story is that even if 99 out 100 continue to commit crimes that doesn’t give us… Read more »

Finnky
Finnky
6 months ago
Reply to  Vanns40

@Vanns – Let’s also look at this from a selfish point of view. Way things are changing, any of us could easily become an accidental felon by simply possessing a standard capacity magazine in the wrong place (which could easily become entire USA) – under current law, after that we would be prohibited from ever possessing firearms of any type – ever again. In several states, they are working on making a felony out of possessing a firearm capable of accepting a “hi-cap” magazine. That would make a S&W shield felony material as pro-mag makes 10 round mags and extensions… Read more »

Tionico
Tionico
6 months ago
Reply to  Finnky

If I were found wihtin the State of New Jersey with my BHP where it is right now on my right hip, with the factory issued mag in the well, one more cambered, all Gold Dots, and a spare factory standard mag also prepped with Gold Dots, I would be facing thirtyone felony charges, all separate. Yet I freely move about here in my own state and the two adjacent oneswith all that as standard kit for being about in public. THAT is the main reason I will not cross that imaginary line into that foul state. I will not… Read more »

Doszap
Doszap
6 months ago
Reply to  Vanns40

I agree we need to get RID of PLEA deals just made for lawyers to get another notch on their briefcases.
If a SOB murders/causes the death of a victim,how the Hades do they get to make a PLEA Deal and get a sentence in lots of cases to be released in 7-10yrs.
It’s ridiculous.

Will Flatt
Will Flatt
6 months ago
Reply to  Doszap

@Doszap, I agree we need to stop doling out plea deals and all sorts of sentence-shortening modifiers for violent criminals. If you murder someone, you ought to be doing at least 75-85% of your sentence, not 7-10 years!! If someone gets out and they go and kill (or just try to kill) someone else, they should be locked up for life or executed!! I honestly believe that our system, because of mugger-hugger liberals, is far too lenient on criminals generally and far too reticent to use the death penalty for murderers, serial rapists, and child molesters. Also, we need to… Read more »

Will Flatt
Will Flatt
6 months ago
Reply to  Vanns40

@Vanns, Your argument is very persuasive and I’m tempted to come around, if only because I believe in absolutely minimal government and a justice system that is as noninvaseive as possible. But I am also an incurable realist. Yes I was speaking in generalities because recidivism is a bit of a broad subject. Yes there are people who turn their lives around and “sin no more”, so to speak. But there are generally a LOT more people who are unwilling or incapable of modifying their behavior to live within civil society and refrain from violating the rights of others! Remember,… Read more »

Tionico
Tionico
6 months ago
Reply to  Will Flatt

and as described above, an YUGE part of the pressures toward recidivism are in direct result of the FACT that when one walks out of Da Joint. having served the sentence rightly imposed, he is NOT a free man. First off, he has a felony record. If he had a commercial license of any sort (driving, professional, technical, etc, ) he does no more. NOW how can he earn his living? He now has a felony record, and employers tend to be chary of hiring such people, no matter HOW “rehabilitated” they are. (ad if they’re not “rehabilitated” why are… Read more »

RoyD
RoyD
7 months ago

Above, you wrote, “Unless one is actually in jail/prison or in the loony farm or under age, he is free and clear to exercise his right to keep and bear arms.”

Tell me, tell us, Deplorable Bill, what is this “age” of which you speak? And who is it that gets to define that “legal age?” You’re talking out of both sides of your mouth on this and I just want to be sure what you are saying. I double dog dare you, Bill!

Dixie
Dixie
7 months ago
Reply to  RoyD

I think if age was a requirement most of our founding fathers may not have made it to be founding fathers..they didn’t wait until 21 to learn how to properly use one either.

Deplorable Bill
Deplorable Bill
7 months ago
Reply to  RoyD

There is a judgment called the age of accountability. You can find that in Scripture. It’s the age when one can tell the difference of right and wrong. I was shooting before the age of 10. My father and a neighbor taught me how to shoot a rifle. We would go the range for a day 2 or 3 times a year. But to actually personally carry and/or own my first firearm I was 18. I joined the Army @ 18 and I was issued a M-16, M-60, a 1911, a “l a w” anti tank rocket, grenades, a M-2… Read more »

RoyD
RoyD
7 months ago

Yeah Bill, clear as mud. I had my first handgun at thirteen. My mother bought it instead of me buying it myself because a couple of political murders took place earlier in the year and the Congress and LBJ decided 21 should be the magic age that summer. Went on a couple of years later and bought a Ruger Super Blackhawk from a friend by myself. Legal? Probably not but my parents and his didn’t have a problem with it. And then there were my dads two Colt Trooper 357s that I carried (one at a time) on occasion. So,… Read more »

RoyD
RoyD
7 months ago
Reply to  RoyD

I have no idea what happened to Dad’s Colts. I suspect that my eldest brother has them as he ended up with that .22 revolver I “bought” in ’68 because I left that with Dad and Mom. It doesn’t bother me as I have several dozen plus guns that I hardly shoot anymore now. At least I have two sons that get along very well. One thing we instilled in our sons was that they take care of each other through thick and thin. So far, so good.

Deplorable Bill
Deplorable Bill
7 months ago
Reply to  RoyD

GOD’s law is the one I follow. I have bet my life, my families’ lifes and my soul to follow GOD’s law.

Arm up, carry on.

TheRevelator
TheRevelator
7 months ago

@Deplorable Bill
It’s the only law I view as higher than the Constitution, and I do prioritize them in that order.

Deplorable Bill
Deplorable Bill
6 months ago
Reply to  TheRevelator

Amen

Arm up, carry on

jack mac
jack mac
6 months ago
Reply to  RoyD

RoyD: I had firearms, including handguns, at an earlier age than you express. This information is irrelevant here. So is the knowing of the possession of firearms. What is relevant is the violations of our codified natural rights (God given). What type of intelligence information are you trying to extract from us by asking which law, natural or human, we will follow? The enemy should not be provided an individual’s intent and means to defend. There is no choice in adhering to ‘God’s’ laws of nature. The stone chiseled orders of the Highest being is misinterpreted by despots to oppress… Read more »

jack mac
jack mac
6 months ago
Reply to  RoyD

RoyD: I, have noticed an increase in age requirements to purchase firearms. By recent law it now illegal to sale tobacco to adult aged citizens under 21. It is our public servants who define and redefine “legal age”. It is our public servant law makers who you need to “double dog dare” and accuse of “talking out of both sides” of their mouth. Laws against selling something, strongly imply, at least, the illegality of possession.

RoyD
RoyD
6 months ago
Reply to  jack mac

Thanks for playing, jack mac. I look forward to your next enlightened contribution. And some people wonder why some people wonder why.

Tionico
Tionico
6 months ago
Reply to  RoyD

Are YOU paying attention, Roy D? In the shot time since the shootemup in Parl=kland Florida where a 19 year old was able to “legally” buy a long gun then used it to kill, many states have changed the age to possess a long gun to 21. The change for handguns has been changed long before that. Used to be one haad to be 21 to enter into a contract, vote, hold public office, etc. then our nannies began to lower that age, mostly to 18. Lately they’ve been pushing it back up again. But they WANT the vote to… Read more »

RoyD
RoyD
6 months ago
Reply to  Tionico

I am fully aware of what has been happening in the world of firearms in this country. I have been paying attention since the summer of 1968 since actions taken that summer by Congress and the President required my mother to purchase my gift to me on my thirteenth birthday in October of that year instead of me buying it myself. As long as stupid people are allowed to proliferate and are allowed to vote on things this is what you are going to have. It is as simple as that. This world needs a cleansing. Funny thing is I… Read more »

jack mac
jack mac
6 months ago
Reply to  RoyD

RoyD: Thank you for your kind remarks, but I am not “playing”. I will try to not have you wait long for my additional non-cash contributions. I also thank you for not asking what I would do with what if attacked by armed government enforcer after firearms that I may have.

Doszap
Doszap
6 months ago

Deplorable—– It did say it qualified as a Felony assault,usual periods for the most minor are at least One year to Three. That right differs from state to state DEPENDING on what class felony,and the circumstances around it.(some states allow the Ex Felon to petition the Court)and get a special ruling allowing them to once again possess(at least at home) After serving their time, there is a period called a CLEANSING PERIOD” it can be up to 10yrs before said ex-felon can be granted their RIGHT to OWN again. It’s different state to state. We do not know enough of… Read more »

jack mac
jack mac
6 months ago

Deplorable Bill: Our public servants degrading citizens into the prohibited class is a primary objective of their greed. Felony convictions are not required prior to subjugating people into the legalize underclass of free citizens. Misdemeanors, even ex post facto, mere charges or accusations can meet the criteria to be so subjugated. Once classed as a prohibited person, even inadvertently, it is next to impossible to be removed. It is to be noted that all must treat this sub-citizen prohibited underclass as such, or be charged with law violations. Charges that will increase the number prohibited. Those finding this information unpopular,… Read more »

Darkman
Darkman
7 months ago

I don’t believe that people like this should be locked up in prison or put to death. They should be set Free. In the Anbar province of Iraqi with a full set of American Flag cloths and an empty AK-47.

RoyD
RoyD
7 months ago

Good. Since we aren’t going to do away with such people he can spend a couple of years with his ilk. And then, when he gets out, it’s rinse and repeat. Only question is how many innocents have to pay for our lack of courage.