Josh Powell’s Book a Kiss & Tell on Inside Dealings of the National Rifle Association

Opinion

Inside the NRA A Tell-All Account of Corruption
Inside the NRA A Tell-All Account of Corruption

Liberty, AZ, USA – -(AmmoLand.com)- It was almost a year ago that I had a conversation with several other concerned NRA members about the curious case of Josh Powell.

It was shortly after the annual Fall Board Meeting in 2019, which had been hastily relocated from Anchorage Alaska to Northern Virginia, and we were speculating on why Powell hadn’t yet been fired. He had driven NRA’s Carry Guard program straight into the ground, costing millions and seriously disrupting the whole Education and Training Division in the process. He had multiple accusations of sexual harassment against him and had either created or had failed to rectify, serious problems within the NRA Competitions Division and among competitive shooters.

The consensus among our little discussion group, was that Powell probably had too much information about too many of the people and activities deep inside the NRA’s inner circle, and he was being kept on the payroll to keep him from sharing any of that information – either with investigators from New York and DC or with reporters and NRA members.

A few months later, Powell was finally fired, and several of us were looking for details on the outrageous severance package that we assumed he must have received to purchase his silence. Barring that, we expected another series of anonymously-sourced articles revealing sordid details of NRA executives behaving badly.

But Powell has surprised most all of us, with the announcement of his new book;

“Inside the NRA: A Tell-All Account of Corruption, Greed and Paranoia Within the Most Powerful Political Group in America.

Powell says he rejected a handsome severance package because it included a strict non-disclosure agreement, which he wasn’t willing to sign. I interpret that to mean that LaPierre wasn’t willing to fork over enough to buy Powell’s silence, so he instead either relied on loyalty or the principle of all hanging together to avoid hanging separately. What a significant error. I suspect that Powell probably worked a deal with Letitia James’ office to allow him to publish the book without fear of legal complications, though it could be a simple bet that he thinks he can make more off of the book than he was offered in the severance package. But there’s always the possibility that someone like Bloomberg saw the potential of a resource like Powell, and offered him a quiet advance on a book deal.

Whatever the process, I have to wonder what could possibly come out in the book that isn’t already known? After all, the accusations in the New York suit are based primarily on depositions given to the NY AG’s office by various current and former NRA employees, including Powell. If he includes things in his book that he omitted from his deposition to NY investigators, he’d be opening himself up to charges of perjury or worse. But, as mentioned above, Powell might have cut a deal in advance, and there’s no doubt that he was present for a lot of meetings and events, the details of which will make for interesting reading.

Of course, whatever Powell says in the book will be dismissed by the NRA as merely the sour grapes of a disgruntled, former employee. I recall an NRA spokesperson saying that the organization doesn’t comment on works of fiction, in response to questions raised by unflattering depictions of LaPierre in Richard Feldman’s book “Ricochet: Confessions of a Gun Lobbyist.” There’s also the possibility that we’ll see Powell sued by LaPierre’s attorney, William Brewer, to either suppress the book or at least suck down the profits a bit. That legal action will, of course, be paid for with NRA members’ money.

Joshua Powell
Joshua Powell

For those who might not be familiar with Josh Powell, that’s not surprising. Powell appeared on the NRA scene, seemingly out of the blue, just a few years ago. Few people in the industry were familiar with him and virtually no one within the rights movement knew his name. Powell appeared on the NRA Nominating Committee’s slate of candidates for the Board in 2013, for the 2014 election. He was elected as one of the establishment candidates, but not long thereafter, he was offered a job in Headquarters as LaPierre’s right-hand man. Then, a couple of years later, in 2017, LaPierre fired the Executive Director of General Operations, Kyle Weaver. Weaver had worked his way up through the ranks of the NRA, as a dedicated, hard-working, true believer, and had begun to be mentioned as a possible successor to Wayne. Then suddenly, he was gone and Powell was being touted as the heir apparent. The only explanation LaPierre offered to Board members who asked about Weaver’s sudden departure, was that he couldn’t talk about it yet, but that it “had to be done,” and he’d disclose everything soon.

Soon never came, and to my knowledge, no explanation has ever been given as to why Weaver, the number two man in the entire NRA operation, had been summarily fired. What we do know is that Weaver appears to have continued receiving his full, $720,000 annual compensation for at least two years after leaving NRA. He now serves as Executive Director of the Rocky Mountain Elk Foundation.

Weaver was initially replaced by then-Deputy Director of General Operations, Joe DeBergalis, who was also recruited from the Board of Directors. He appears to have been paid $368,000 as Deputy Director, then $461,000 as Acting Director of General Operations, until he was replaced by LaPierre’s Chief of Staff, Josh Powell, who was already pulling down over $711,000. That jumped to about $920,000 after Powell took over General Operations.

Powell appears to be one of those guys with a reverse-Midas touch, as in everything he touches turns into something exactly the opposite of gold. He started in the outdoors industry in the catalog business, selling high-end “safari” and “expedition” clothing. He appears to have tried that in a couple of different iterations, all of which failed, leaving a trail of lawsuits and bankruptcies in his wake. At NRA, Powell took charge of the new NRA Carry Guard program, immediately stepping in excrement when he barred the US Concealed Carry Association and other groups that offered concealed carry insurance, from exhibiting at the NRA Annual Meetings and Exhibits. That created quite a brouhaha and was widely seen as petty and vindictive.

Things went downhill from there, with New York, then Washington State and then several other states, throwing penalty flags on Carry Guard and the sales and marketing practices being employed by NRA and its contractors. This led to a variety of fines, penalties, and lawsuits, costing NRA tens of millions of dollars. New York led the charge, but overplayed their hand, threatening any business that did business with the NRA. Their heavy-handed tactics were so egregious that even the ACLU came to NRA’s defense. This led to NRA suing New York and its governor, Andrew Cuomo. That suit is ongoing and has been ridiculously expensive for the Association.

Powell was never well-liked by NRA staffers or the Board of Directors. While he was often mentioned as being groomed to take the EVP position if Wayne decided to retire, several Directors told me in no uncertain terms that they would never allow that to happen. The only people Powell actually seemed to get along with were Wayne, his new attorney, Bill Brewer, and former NRA President Pete Brownell.

The revelations in Powell’s book could be interesting, after all, he was very close to LaPierre during a pivotal and contentious time, so there’s really no telling what sort of information he might have been privy to, but it seems unlikely that there would be a large enough market for the book to make it worth walking away from, what was probably better than a million-dollar severance package.

I’m hoping to procure an advance copy of the book, and I’ll let you know what I find.



Jeff Knox
Jeff Knox

About Jeff Knox:

Jeff Knox is a second-generation political activist and director of The Firearms Coalition. His father Neal Knox led many of the early gun rights battles for your right to keep and bear arms. Read Neal Knox – The Gun Rights War.

The Firearms Coalition is a loose-knit coalition of individual Second Amendment activists, clubs and civil rights organizations. Founded by Neal Knox in 1984, the organization provides support to grassroots activists in the form of education, analysis of current issues, and with a historical perspective of the gun rights movement. The Firearms Coalition has offices in Buckeye, Arizona and Manassas, VA. Visit: www.FirearmsCoalition.org.

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nobodyuknow
nobodyuknow
7 months ago

I am a Benefactor Life Member of the National Rifle Association and have been for many years. It pains me to see the state of this organization as it exists now. If the allegations are true about LaPierre and the way he is looting the NRA treasury, he needs to go NOW!!! What really needs to happen is that an unbiased outside investigatory group needs to come in and do an in-depth investigation of the NRA with full and unfettered access to all records. The group then needs to make a report that pulls no punches and tells the complete… Read more »

Pa John
Pa John
7 months ago

In politics, appearances can be more important than reality, especially during election years. First, let’s review some numbers. Before 2020 with it’s projected 20 million gun sales for this year, and already some 5 million new gun owners and such with 4 months left in the year to go for 2020, the popular estimates for the number of guns in the U.S. in 2019 was 428 million, in the hands of some 110 to 126 million gun owners, minimum. On the other hand, the NRA’s membership is generally estimated at around 5 million. So, if we go with the lower… Read more »

Chev
Chev
7 months ago

This is the second slanderous article I’ve read by Jeff. I wonder if it has anything to do with his position in a rival organization? He has yet to say anything positive about the NRA that I have seen. Sour grapes? I’m taking whatever he opines about with a grain of salt, about the size of a front end loader.

JPM
JPM
7 months ago
Reply to  Chev

But you love and adore Wayne LaPierre and dote on and believe every word out of his mouth.

Westside
Westside
7 months ago

I quit supporting the NRA when they helped write and pass the Brady Bill. The excuse was always “if we don’t compromise it will be really bad”. IMHO the NRA should clean house, then be “re-imagined” as an Education and Training Organization. No more politics nor lobbyists.

Last edited 7 months ago by Westside
Bill
Bill
7 months ago

Jeff rumor and gossip? Why not wait until facts are known? Taking suppositions and then using conclusions from the suppositions is one way that fake news is created. Let us pray for and bless him!

JIAZ
JIAZ
7 months ago

We don’t need thieving Wayne’s corrupt NRA. Truth is we never did. We’ve just been subjected to decades of marketing propaganda to make us believe we did. What we need to do is stop asking permission to exercise our constitutional rights. We need to stop obeying “proclamations” from mayors and governors who behave as if they’re a royal ruling class and we’re their subjects. We need to remind them they work for us. N, R, A, N-ot R-elevant A-nymore “Non-Profit” my A$$ “Whistleblowers within the organization’s finance department helped shed light on practices targeted by a New York Attorney General’s… Read more »