At Home, in the Car, and on the Street – Self Defense Gun Stories

Crazy Attackers, Robbers, and Convicts – More Self Defense Gun Stories iStock-1085735902
At Home, in the Car, and on the Street – Self Defense Gun Stories

U.S.A. – -(AmmoLand.com)- You probably didn't see this news covered by the mainstream media, but again this week, responsible gun owners defended themselves and the people they love. Self-defense instructor Amanda Suffecool joins the Self Defense Gun Stories Podcast to look at four new examples. Were these gun owners lucky, or were they well trained? (19-minute audio)

First story- Are you armed at home?

You’re getting ready for bed. You step out of the shower and see someone walk past one of your windows. It is 10:20 at night. You had polio as a child and you need a cane and a leg brace to walk. Your intruder kicks your back door and then starts beating the glass with a brick. You own a firearm. You get your handgun and call 911. You stand in the hallway and plead for your intruder to leave. You stand there naked with your gun in your hand for 15 minutes while the intruder smashes the glass and you plead with the dispatcher. The police never come. Finally, your attacker walks away.

Your neighbors follow your intruder until the intruder walks up to the police who are staged a few hundred yards away at the end of the block. Now you hang up on the dispatcher and put on your clothes. Your attacker is arrested for burglary. It will take about three thousand dollars to replace your back door and its hurricane glass. One neighbor complained, “Now I know that I cannot count on police.” (Tag- No shots fired)

Second Story- Are you armed in your car?

You’re sitting in your car. It is 5:30 in the evening and you’re at the parking lot of a large hardware store. You’re getting ready to leave when you look up to see someone run out the emergency exit. You wonder if there is an emergency until the man carrying packages runs to a nearby car where a woman is sitting in the driver’s seat with the engine running. This looks like a theft in progress, so you pull forward to take a picture or get a license number. The man sees you and runs toward you with an ax handle in his hands. He smashes your car windows. You get out of your car and back away. Your attacker chases you.

You’re armed. You present your firearm and shoot your attacker. Now, he stops advancing and falls to the ground. You call 911 and the getaway car drives away.

EMTs take your attacker to the hospital. You stay at the scene and tell the police what happened.

Third story- Are you armed when you’re driving through the city at night?

It is 9:30 at night and you’re driving through Los Angeles. You stop at a red light when a stranger runs up to your car. He puts his body next to the driver’s side window and pulls a gun out of his pants. He yells for you to get out of your car.

You’re belted in place. You also own a firearm. You’re armed tonight. You draw your firearm and shoot your attacker. Now you drive a half block and pull into a well-lighted gas station. There you call 911.

The police find your attacker at the intersection. He was hit by a car that sped away after the collision. You give a statement to the police.

Fourth story- Are you armed in public?

It is 10:30 at night. You walk into a small restaurant to get your takeout order. You’re talking on the phone when a man behind the counter turns around, sees you, and points his gun at you. He tells you to hand over your phone. The three employees behind the counter have their hands up and are emptying the cash drawer. You walked in on a robbery in progress.

You’re a gun owner and you have your Pennsylvania concealed carry permit. You’re armed tonight. You hold your phone out as you draw your firearm. You shoot your attacker one time in the neck. Now the attacker drops his gun and falls to the ground. You and the store employees call 911. You stay at the scene and talk to the police. EMTs say your attacker died at the scene. Police are reviewing the security video.


About Rob Morse 

Rob Morse writes about gun rights at Ammoland, at Clash Daily, and on his SlowFacts blog. He hosts the Self Defense Gun Stories Podcast and co-hosts the Polite Society Podcast. Rob was an NRA pistol instructor and combat handgun competitor.

Contact Amanda Suffecool at her nationally syndicated radio show Eye on the Target Radio.

Rob Morse

 

 

Subscribe
Notify of
6 Comments
Inline Feedbacks
View all comments
Coelacanth
Coelacanth
1 month ago

Fortune favors the prepared.

james
james
1 month ago

Stay Frosty folks. Leave the phone in your pocket, scope out your area and have your head on a swivel. Safey wrap around glasses are a good idea to prevent chemical attacks from criminal element.

3l120
3l120
1 month ago
Reply to  james

and bulletproof vests are useful if he is faster than you are.

gregs
gregs
1 month ago

the first story is a sign of the times and of times to come. thankfully the homeowner had a firearm and was prepared to use it. this is another case of the coward county sheriffs at work. if you remember this is where marjorie stoneman douglas high school is located and we all know how the sheriffs acted that day. sad that they haven’t gotten better officers since then. but then again the supreme court has ruled that the police have no duty to protect individual lives, that takes courage, morality and decency.
you are your first responder. be prepared.

Watch um
Watch um
1 month ago

It is five days before Christmas, 5:00 pm already dark. Someone knocks on my front door, I have a gun in my hand as I look out the side window of the door. A guy ask me to come outside and jump his car off because the battery is dead. I see a ax handle partly concealed by his leg and ask why he has that at the same time I notice shoes of another person against the wall just out of view. I tell the hidden guy to step out so I can see him, he also has a… Read more »

3l120
3l120
1 month ago
Reply to  Watch um

Now that is the way to do it. Opening the door because there is a knock on it is not always the wisest decision. Doorbell cameras are cheap and using one can save your life. I spent 23 years on LAPD before being injured and as a cop if someone asked for ID, I would flash my ID, not my badge, or tell them to call 911 and ask if the police were dispatched there. Kicking down a door was never necessary, mostly because the calls I was on never were appropriate. Standing in front of a door to kick… Read more »