$37,000 Reward for Info on Suspicious Death of Mexican Gray Wolf near Eagar AZ

Mexican Gray Wolf Img Clark, Jim, USFWS
Mexican Gray Wolf Img Clark, Jim, USFWS

Eagar, Arizona – -(AmmoLand.com)- The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (Service) and partners are offering a combined reward of up to $37,000 for information leading to a conviction in connection with the suspicious death of an endangered Mexican gray wolf near Eagar, Arizona.

Federal law enforcement officers recovered the carcass of the wolf from the Saffel Canyon Road (RTE 76) in the Apache-Sitgreaves National Forest on February 19, 2021. The Service is seeking information about a vehicle that was stopped or driving slowly near the Saffel Canyon Trailhead on the evening of February 18, 2021. The public is encouraged to report information regarding this case by calling 1-844-FWS-TIPS (397-8477) or emailing [email protected]

The Service is offering a reward of up to $10,000; the Arizona Game and Fish Department Operation Game Thief is offering a reward of up to $1,000, and the New Mexico Department of Game and Fish is offering a reward of up to $1,000 for information leading to the conviction of the individual(s) responsible for the wolf’s death. A variety of non-governmental organizations and private individuals have pledged additional funding for a total reward amount of up to $37,000, depending on the information provided.

Killing a Mexican wolf is a violation of state law and the federal Endangered Species Act and can result in federal criminal penalties of up to $50,000, up to a year in jail, or a civil penalty of up to $25,000.

“Each endangered wolf deserves a chance to survive in the wild,” said Amy Lueders, Regional Director for the Service in Albuquerque, New Mexico. “Our law enforcement officers are actively working with the Arizona Game and Fish Department to conduct a comprehensive investigation into this suspicious death. These investigations are extensive, and wolf poachers have faced, and will continue to face, serious criminal consequences.”

“We at the Forest Service on the Apache-Sitgreaves National Forest are grateful to work with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service in support of their active investigation,” said Anthony Madrid, Forest Supervisor. “We greatly understand the importance and connection our communities and so many people have with these magnificent animals and are encouraged by the work that our partners are doing. We strongly encourage members of our community to work with us and contact the proper authorities if they have any information,” added Madrid.

“The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service is committed to the protection and sustainability of the Mexican wolf,” said Phillip Land, Special Agent in Charge of the U. S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Office of Law Enforcement, Southwestern United States. “With the assistance of our partners and the public, we will find the person responsible for the death of this endangered animal.”

The Mexican Wolf Reintroduction Project is a cooperative effort administered by seven co-lead agencies: Arizona Game and Fish Department, New Mexico Department of Game and Fish, White Mountain Apache Tribe, U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service, USDA Wildlife Services, USDA Forest Service and the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service.

These agencies function as an adaptive management oversight committee. This management approach provides opportunities for participation by local governments, non-governmental organizations and individuals from all segments of the public.

  • More information regarding the Service’s Mexican wolf recovery effort is available here: https://www.fws.gov/southwest/es/mexicanwolf/.
  • More information about how to report wildlife crime can be found here: https://www.fws.gov/refuges/lawEnforcement/report-wildlife-crimes.php.



The mission of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service is working with others to conserve, protect and enhance fish, wildlife, plants and their habitats for the continuing benefit of the American people. We are both a leader and trusted partner in fish and wildlife conservation, known for our scientific excellence, stewardship of lands and natural resources, dedicated professionals and commitment to public service. For more information on our work and the people who make it happen, visit http://www.fws/gov.

U.S. Fish and Wildlife

 

 

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JPM
JPM
24 days ago

The entire article is a crock by the USFWS and their sycophant Federal and state agencies. Unless you have experience and know what to look for, the Mexican Wolf is hard to differentiate from a coyote. They both are the same size overall, but the gate (way they run) is different, the head and ears are dissimilar, but not by much and the way they carry their tail differs, but if you don’t know what to look for, the vast majority of people cannot tell the difference. The USFWS are worse than BATFE when it comes to destroying people’s lives… Read more »

Phil
Phil
25 days ago

What if the wolf was killed by a dreamer?

freewill
freewill
25 days ago

At first glance I thought it was a coyote. And what was suspicious about its death? Are we to assume it died on the 18th and found on the 19th? Certainly not decomposed yet. Was it shot or not?, enquiring minds wanna know

DIYinSTL
DIYinSTL
26 days ago

The photo at the top of the article doesn’t look that much different from a coyote and this ‘lupicide’ could be a case of mistaken identity by the alleged perpetrator.

Tionico
Tionico
26 days ago

sounds a lot like the problems with the Greater GreyWolf our blnderment so “wisely” imported to Montana, Idaho,Wyoming. NOT the same critter as te :lesser grey wolf” that they were trying to “bring back”. Larger, fater metablism, more prolific breeders, strongar and faster, they not only settled in and made a new home in those areas, they’ve pushed out the few remaining Lesser Greys, worsening the problem they were trying to “fix”. but, they took care of large quantities of tax money to wrangle this travesty. Target population was around 6,000 in the region. Ten years lter, ACTUAL population was… Read more »

gregs
gregs
26 days ago
Reply to  Tionico

please use spell check before posting, your comment was not easy to read.

SGM Chuck
SGM Chuck
26 days ago

First question is did the wolf cross the border with the appropriate identification or was he sponsored by a direct family member and will any pups be anchor babies?

freewill
freewill
25 days ago
Reply to  SGM Chuck

Beijing Joe is in office now, that wolf dont need any identification!

musicman44mag
musicman44mag
25 days ago
Reply to  freewill

Papers, we don’t need no stinking papers!!!!

swmft
swmft
26 days ago

they give a bigger reward for this than for tips to solve gang killings. This is about power and control not the wolf. The reward for tips in a shooting with 4 dead in miami was only $7,000 then the family of one victim did a go fund me which put the number to $15,000 no takers. suspected target was the father of one of the children that died

Jeffersonian
Jeffersonian
26 days ago

But we still don’t know who murdered Ashli Babbitt.

MICHAEL J
MICHAEL J
26 days ago

We have the wrong agency guarding our borders. All this over one wolf?

JSNMGC
JSNMGC
26 days ago
Reply to  MICHAEL J

Remember the federal LE resources that were deployed to investigate a garage door pull?

During the summer of 2020 when incendiary devices were being used by mostly violent rioters in many cities, did you hear of any BATFE enforcement actions against those rioters for violating the NFA of 1934?

freewill
freewill
25 days ago
Reply to  MICHAEL J

did you notice how many bureacracies was involved? Reagan said it best! Government is to big and costs to much!

Equalizer
Equalizer
26 days ago

Until you look out your window and see wolves sitting there waiting to come in and attack your pets, livestock, or possibly even children you don’t understand the wolf problem. Ranchers sitting with handfuls of “vouchers” to cover the cost of the lost livestock can’t even get a cup of coffee with the voucher as they never get paid. The crap about wolves only taking out the old and sick game animals is for the idiot masses. Yes, they do kill and eat the old and sick until there are none then they start on the young and work their… Read more »

Paul O.
Paul O.
26 days ago

That’s an insane amount of money for an animal. The world is turned upside down.

willyd
willyd
26 days ago
Reply to  Paul O.

Has been, STARTED WITH A HOT CUP OF COFFEE AT McDONALDS YEARS AGO!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

Norm
Norm
26 days ago

What if a bald eagle killed the wolf?

gregs
gregs
26 days ago
Reply to  Norm

the eagle is a symbol of oppression and the wolf is a mexican grey wolf. i think you know the answer.

musicman44mag
musicman44mag
25 days ago
Reply to  gregs

LOL, the eagle was racist. Good one.

Roland T. Gunner
Roland T. Gunner
26 days ago

I’m all for protecting endangered species; beautiful animals like wolves in particular. But the money involved in investigations, rewards and fines is just stupid. And then you hear the moronic statements by the treehugging F&G officials, and you realize, its not about enforcing laws or z reasonsble, measured justice system; it’s about their religion. They have no sense of perspective.

musicman44mag
musicman44mag
25 days ago

sierra clubbers.

Montana59
Montana59
26 days ago

Looks like some one forgot the second S in the three S Formula.

Alan in NH
Alan in NH
26 days ago
Reply to  Montana59

Shoot, shovel, and shut up.

Jaque
Jaque
27 days ago

When killers of wolves are given more attention by law enforcement than the criminals in the Obama and Biden regimes then we know America is under communist rule.

Nam62
Nam62
27 days ago

How about shifting this reward to Gun Hatting DemoRates!