Think About Self Defense, How Far Away is Your Gun?

Baldwin Shooting: A Calamity of Preventable Gun Safety Errors
Think About Self Defense, How Far Away is Your Gun?

U.S.A. -(AmmoLand.com)- You probably didn’t see these stories covered by the mainstream news media, but again last week, responsible gun owners defended themselves and the people they love. Self-defense instructor Amanda Suffecool joins the Self Defense Gun Stories Podcast to look at four new examples. Were these gun owners lucky, or did they have a plan?
(21-minute audio)

First story- Do you have a firearm nearby at night?

You’re at home asleep on a weekday night. It is after midnight when you feel your house shudder and hear someone kick in your back door. You go downstairs and see an intruder. The intruder pulls a gun out of his pants and points the gun at you. You run back upstairs to your bedroom. You grab your gun. The intruder chases you into your bedroom and shoots at you. You shoot your attacker. Now your attacker turns and runs back outside. You stop shooting. You stay inside and call 911.

You hear a car drive away. Police also get reports of someone who matches the description of your attacker who was dumped at the side of the road. Emergency medical services take him to a local hospital where he is pronounced dead. Police find your attacker’s gun. You are not charged with a crime.

Second Story- Do you bring a gun with you when you answer the door at midnight? and here.

It is a few minutes before midnight when you hear someone banging on your front door. You grab your firearm and go see who it is. The stranger says he needs to come in. You open the door and the stranger tries to push his way into your home. You push back and then shoot your attacker. Your attacker stops pushing so you stop shooting. You hear a car race out of your driveway. You backup and call 911.

You put your gun away. When the police arrive you give them a brief statement. Police find your attacker in the doorway. EMTs declare him dead at the scene. You’re not charged with a crime. Police are looking for your attacker’s accomplice.

Third story- Are you armed at home in the afternoon?

It is just after lunch when you walk to your car. Your car is parked in a covered garage behind your house. You’re standing in your garage when a car rolls up the alley and stops behind your car so you can’t get out. A stranger gets out of the car and asks you a question. The stranger also has a gun in his hand and the gun is pointed at you. Now the stranger tells you to give him everything you have.

One of the things you have is an Illinois Firearms Owners Identification card in your wallet. You also have a concealed firearm on your hip. You stall for time and then present your handgun. You shoot your attacker in the chest and the head. Your attacker drops his gun so you stop shooting. You stay at the scene and call 911. You holster your firearm before the police arrive.

You tell the police what happened. Police take your attacker’s gun as evidence. Emergency Medical Services declare your attacker dead at the scene.

You’re a 77-year-old retired fire captain. You are not charged.

Fourth story- Are you armed in public late at night?

You are done with your late-night snack. You leave the Wafflehouse restaurant and walk to your car. A couple are arguing in the parking lot nearby. You don’t say anything and open your car door to drive away. The man who was arguing hits you and tries to enter your car. You push him away, but he continues to fight. You’re carrying concealed. You shoot your attacker one time in the leg. Now he stops fighting. You shout for help, holster your firearm, and then call 911.

You give a statement to the police when they arrive. Emergency medical services transport your attacker to the hospital. The woman who was part of the argument makes a statement to the police, as do people from inside the restaurant. You’re not charged with a crime.

A discussion of each story is at the Self Defense Gun Stories podcast webpage.

Subscribe
Notify of
15 Comments
Inline Feedbacks
View all comments
wapitihunter
wapitihunter (@wapitihunter)
17 days ago

I almost always have a firearm within arm’s reach. I have several placed strategically throughout sleep my house. I sleep with a 1911 .45 under my pillow and a Ruger .44Mag carbine beside my bed. If someone breaks into my house he won’t leave on his own. That’s what body bags are for.

KK
KK (@kuetsayahoo-com)
17 days ago

“It is after midnight when you feel your house shudder and hear someone kick in your back door. You go downstairs and see an intruder. The intruder pulls a gun out of his pants and points the gun at you. You run back upstairs to your bedroom. You grab your gun.”

HAHAHAHahahaha – REALLY!???!
Why the hell would I LEAVE MY GUN UP IN THE BEDROOM when going down to investigate a HOME INVASION!???!

Divino Vocamen
Divino Vocamen (@divino-vocamen)
18 days ago

Second story reminded me …Years ago a drunk ran off the county road near our house at about 3 a.m. …we awoke to his banging on the front door …and when I opened the inside door he demanded access to our phone and I told him I was calling the Sheriff as we spoke and then he angrily pulled open the outer screen door and attempted to shove me away …but my Large Doberman who as usual was quietly watching then joined the discussion and the “pusher ” became a “runner ” and was shortly in a Deputies custody as… Read more »

wapitihunter
wapitihunter (@wapitihunter)
17 days ago
Reply to  Divino Vocamen

And a big hug I hope.

JimmyS
JimmyS (@jimmys)
18 days ago

Boating accidents. Tragic boating accidents.

Wild Bill
Wild Bill (@wild-bill)
18 days ago

Every six feet from kitchen to bedroom, but not in standard places, in the refrigerator, in the dog cookie jar, in the utensils drawer, behind a series of short books on the library shelf.
If anyone has other non-standard concealment spots, then I am all ears.

Finnky
Finnky (@finnks)
17 days ago
Reply to  Wild Bill

If you’ve got a large house, you may be driver of the recent gun shortage 🙂

Cannot think of a better reason to buy hi-points. Scatter them like Hansel and Gretel leaving bread crumbs.

HLB
HLB (@hlb482gmail-com)
19 days ago

Always strapped to me when I am outside of the house.
Always in my hand when I answer the door.
Always under my pillow when I sleep.
The Sheriff’s department would not agree to hold my weapon when I was called to serve jury duty, so I did not go.

HLB

swmft
swmft (@swmft)
18 days ago
Reply to  HLB

I have had the same problem I called a judge and they issued a release from service , his statement to me was they have to accommodate all disabilities

Wild Bill
Wild Bill (@wild-bill)
18 days ago
Reply to  swmft

Now THAT is a good judge! Funny statement, though.

Last edited 18 days ago by Wild Bill
Finnky
Finnky (@finnks)
17 days ago
Reply to  Wild Bill

Maybe, maybe not. Some judges are prejudiced against gun owners. Some to point of considering gun ownership a sign of mental illness. Those judges are all too happy to release you from jury duty as incompetent to serve.

A truly good judge would order sheriff to arrange a “gun check” at courthouse entrance. He views gun ownership as a sign of maturity and responsibility – believes you’ll make a good juror and wants you to serve.

WI Patriot
WI Patriot (@wi-patriot)
19 days ago

Arms reach, not matter where I am…

Darkman
Darkman (@darkman)
19 days ago

On my hip.On the desk. Next to me now. On the night stand next to bed when sleeping and on the vanity when in the shower. Not to mention the ‘Ol lady whose much more vicious than Me. She aims for the Groin Shot. Likes to watch’em Roll around screaming for awhile before they bleed Out..

swmft
swmft (@swmft)
18 days ago
Reply to  Darkman

my girlfriend too, cant hit anywhere else

Wild Bill
Wild Bill (@wild-bill)
18 days ago
Reply to  Darkman

Does she do that very often?