Armed at Home, in Public, and as You Drive

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Armed at Home, in Public, and as You Drive

U.S.A. -(AmmoLand.com)- You probably didn’t see these stories covered by the mainstream news media, but again last week, responsible gun owners defended themselves and the people they love. Self-defense instructor Amanda Suffecool joins the Self Defense Gun Stories Podcast to look at four new examples. Were these gun owners lucky, or did they have a plan?

First story- Are you armed during the day?

You are at home with your young son. It is about 8 in the morning when you hear glass break from the front of your house. That is near your son’s room, so you grab your gun and open your bedroom door to see what is happening.

You see that your son’s door is open and there is a stranger standing in your hallway. You present your firearm and shoot until the man drops. You run to check on your son. He is looking around and wondering what broke his window, but he isn’t injured. You keep your son with you and call 911.

You have to leave your son for a minute to put your gun away and open the front door for the police. EMS takes your attacker to the hospital with life-threatening injuries. You show the police your identification. You give them a brief statement and explain that you don’t know your attacker. The police recover 9 shell casings in your hallway. Your attacker was shot in the chest, neck, and head.

You are not charged with a crime.

Second Story- Are you armed in public?

It is just before midnight when your mom calls you. She says a stranger is trying to get into her home. You grab your firearm and drive the few blocks to your mom’s home. You walk up and see a stranger break through your mom’s front door. You follow him and tell him to stop. He keeps going and you shoot him several times. Now he stops, turns, and tries to leave. He falls at the front door.

You check on your mom and she is uninjured. The news stories aren’t clear if she called 911 or if you did. Your mom tells you that the stranger said he was a home healthcare nurse and was performing a checkup. She didn’t let him in and the stranger broke down her door.

You give a brief statement to the police. So does your mom. EMS declares your attacker dead at the scene.

You are not charged.

Third story- Do you have a gun nearby at night?

You’re walking out of your apartment at 10pm. You turn to lock your door when two men come up behind you.

Police. Stay where you are. Keep your hands where we can see them.

They are wearing badges around their necks and black ski masks over their faces.

They push you back inside your apartment and draw their guns. They tell you not to move. They demand your money, and they pull zip ties from their pockets. You figure out that these are not the police.

You’re armed with a gun on your hip. You pull your hand free, get a grip on your gun, and shoot the nearest attacker several times. Your closest attacker falls and the second attacker runs out the door. Your girlfriend yells from upstairs. You shout back to call the cops.

You stay inside your apartment. You holster your gun. You give the police a brief statement. Emergency Medical Services transports your attacker to the hospital. The police recover six shell casings on your doorstep. You have to go to the police station where detectives question you and your girlfriend. You’re released to return home.

Your attacker was declared dead with gunshot wounds to his chest, arm, and head. You’re not charged with a crime.

You talked to the reporter who called and you said that things have gotten crazy in Philadelphia and that everyone who can should be armed.

Fourth story- Are you armed as you arrive home?

You turn onto your street and see an empty parking place. It is about an hour after sunset. The only places to park your car for the night are on the street and you’re glad you found a spot near your home. You turn off your car, lock it, and start walking down the street to your front door. You see a car stop and back up the street. The car stops and the passenger gets out. The passenger points a gun at you and tells you to give him your keys.

You are a gun owner too. You have your Louisiana carry permit. You’re armed tonight. You throw the car keys toward your car and you run the other way. You run between the cars and duck under a parked car. You present your firearm. You watch the robber move toward your car. He sees you and raises his gun. You shoot first and then run for your front door. Inside, you call 911 and ask for the police.

You give the officers a brief statement. They check your driver’s license and your carry permit. You and the officers look down the street. Your car is still in its parking place and your keys are next to it.

Police arrest your attackers at the local hospital. Your robber is unconscious with a bullet wound in his neck. The police recover two other handguns in the getaway car. One of the guns is listed as stolen.

News reports don’t mention how the three young men, all 17 years old, were charged. In the last year, there have been four carjackings on your street and two more attempted carjackings.

A discussion of each story is at the Self Defense Gun Stories podcast webpage.

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Xaun Loc

Note that in the Fourth Story, the armed perpetrator will now be counted as a “child victim of gun violence” in this year’s statistics.

gregs

first story, peter olson is only worried about his children getting hit by stray bullets, not the criminal breaking into homes during the daytime, work on marksmanship.
#2, home health care doesn’t come at midnight.
#3, real cops, good cops don’t wear ski masks while at work, it’s called accountability.
#4, don’t commit crimes and you won’t get shot. maybe this guy can teach the guy in the first story marksmanship.

WeWereWarned

A helpful situational awareness tip for the third story, is that any person approaching you with a ski mask on while indoors, should have you prepared or in the process of drawing your gun. I like the 12 shot compact gun that is in my front right slack pocket. I can see the possible threat and brandish(firm grip and ready to draw and fire)without visible brandishing. If the homeless drunk/junkie, or low income minority leaves my family alone in the parking lot or park, then I don’t have to draw in under 3/4s of a second. If they have a… Read more »