Rochester NY Man Sentenced To 25 Years On Gun Charge

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Rochester NY Man Sentenced To 25 Years On Gun Charge
Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives ( ATF )
Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives ( ATF )

ROCHESTER, N.Y.— -(Ammoland.com)-  Acting U.S. Attorney James P. Kennedy, Jr. announced today that Allan Watson, 36, of Rochester, NY, who was convicted of possession of a firearm in furtherance of a drug trafficking crime, was sentenced to 25 years in prison by U.S. District Judge Elizabeth A. Wolford.

The defendant was also ordered to forfeit two firearms and rounds of ammunition seized at the time of his arrest.

Assistant U.S. Attorney Robert A. Marangola, who handled the case, stated that shortly after midnight on July 14, 2016, Rochester Police Department officers responded to a motor vehicle crash near the intersection of Hollenbeck Street and Belfour Drive in Rochester.

During the crash investigation, officers directed Watson out of an SUV and, after a brief struggle with police, he was taken into custody.

At that time, defendant had a loaded 9mm pistol, crack cocaine, and heroin packaged for street sale, as well as over $3,899 in cash.

The sentencing is the result of an investigation by the Rochester Police Department, under the direction of Chief Michael Ciminelli, the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms, and Explosives, under the direction of Special Agent-in-Charge Ashan Benedict, and the United States Marshal Service, under the direction of Charles Salina.

  • 20 thoughts on “Rochester NY Man Sentenced To 25 Years On Gun Charge

    1. I feel My 2nd Amendment Rights are violated !!! First problem is politicians who refuse to admit this mass murders are about mental health. We have a critical issue of politicians cutting money for mental issues. Closing mental health facilities to try & balance budgets. Illinois is prime example. Closing mental health facilities & clinics since the 70’s.It continues still. Closing mental health hospitals, cuts in outpatient facilities, programs, clinics, cuts to coverage to mental health across the board!!!! During this, We see more & more murders like in Teaxas. Then again politicians cutting money for First Responders. Creating longer response times. In many cases before law Enforcement gets on scene the criminal has already started murdering & finished or on the run. Some cases Law Enforcement engages the murder & either kills the murder of murder kills themselves! Most of these cases it happens in gun free zones.We must admit if We had the right to carry &bear arms You will more likely have a person with these rights would engage the murder & injure the murderer to be disabled to continue due to injury or death. Resulting in less injury & death by the murderer!!! Even if You take all guns away from law abiding Citizens will only cause criminals to still have guns or find other means of murdering people; like using knives, bombs, chemical warfare. Use anthrax & other such chemicals to do mass murders!!!!!

      1. In many jurisdictions, 1st responders other than cops are paid directly through a taxing district. Politicians have little input. If you expect police to show up to stop the shooter, you are sadly mistaken. The old axiom says “When seconds count, the cops are only minutes away.
        Many mental health hospitals were closed due to the civil Rights Act of 1964. The mentally ill deserve civil liberties. Where do we draw the line? Most cops who have 10 years on the job would be excluded from possessing guns due to paranoia.
        The only attempt at a solution is more good guys with guns.

    2. Well we have been slamming the gov for their lack of enforcement of existing gun laws. So to make themselves look good use a minor gun possession backed up by drugs for sale to slap a 25 yr sentence on him. Look everyone we’re enforcing the gun laws!!!

    3. @John, “significance of over $3,899”, they think he traveled thru New York City and spent about $200 on bridge and tunnel tolls to get thru that corrupt and continuous flowing trough of money to get to the other side. It would have made them look bad if they had published the whereabouts of the other $200 as the Democrat run NYS Controllers Office never gets off his butt and audits these bridge and tunnel authorities to find out where all this endless flowing money is going.

    4. They’re sending a very clear message.
      They are far more concerned with getting rid of guns then controlling scumbag drug dealers.

    5. A waste of bandwidth. These convictions are common except usually the sentence is for the drugs, not the gun possession. Way to go NY. Put the possession of a gun ahead of the dope selling that is killing far more than guns.

    6. A lot of manpower, at the taxpayer ‘s expense, for one drug dealer. Unbelievable the extent they will go through to get a little notoriety.

      1. Optimally, the drug dealer would have resisted until a lethal response by the police occurred.

        Drug dealers need to be put where the cat put the poop!

    7. What is the significance of over $3899 in cash? If it was $3900 or more just say so. Or was it $3899.57. Nice to see laws being enforced for a change. Previous assessments spot on, if this were inner city would be a misdemeanor, small fine and out the revolving door. Big cities just can’t afford to keep these guys behind bars.

    8. 25 years on the gun charges, and no sentence on the crack and heroin? Or almost all of the 25 were sentencing for the gun, and a few months for the crack and heroin?
      How much crack and heroin? Posted by Ammoland…but probably written by one of those failing left writers from that rag called Newsday?

      1. Why do you say 25 years on the gun charges? The article does not state that as a fact. It only states that a total of 25 years was sentenced. So, what were all the charges, and how many years for each?
        Defendant was involved in a vehicle crash. Was he charged with reckless driving? DUI? Was he at fault in the accident? He struggled with the police, so we know he was uncooperative and resisted arrest. If he had prior felony convictions, then he is an habitual offender in the act of committing another crime. AND he was a felon in possession of a prohibited firearm and significant amount of the controlled substance.

        1. Read the report. It is directly from ATF/Justice.gov. He was sentenced by a Federal District Judge for a federal gun crime. The other crimes are state crimes.
          I hope you don’t possess any firearms if you can’t read a simple report.

    9. The sentencing is the result of an investigation by the Rochester Police Department, under the direction of Chief Michael Ciminelli, the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms, and Explosives, under the direction of Special Agent-in-Charge Ashan Benedict, and the United States Marshal Service, under the direction of Charles Salina.
      So the BATFE did nothing beyond direct the RPD? I bet that the RPD did not need much directing. Sounds like the do nothing BATFE is trying to justify its existence by grabbing a headline.
      Long past time for the BATFE to go. Give the taxpayers a break.

    10. Sounds like a lot of law enforcement and prosecutorial firepower was expended in the conviction of one criminal, compared to the hundreds of similar types of felons they let off with just a slap on the wrist in Chicago, Baltimore, and other third-world, Democrat strongholds. Wonder what we’re not being told?

    11. He was sntenced for drug trafficking! The gun charge may have been an additive factor. The article is misleading.

        1. Anytime ATF puts out a story I wonder what “the rest of the story” is and what their motivations are.

    12. This article is not complete. Were there drug charges? How about possession with intent to distribute? Having a gun during a felony crime is an enhancement. Nothing wrong with a criminal getting time added on because he/she has a gun at the time of a crime…..Still this article does not have enough information.

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