Overwatch Precision D.A.T. V2 Trigger for Glock Pistols | Review

Overwatch Precision D.A.T. V2 Trigger
Overwatch Precision D.A.T. V2 Trigger

U.S.A. (Ammoland.com) – With a million Glock triggers on the market, some of them not even drop safe, selecting a trigger that you can trust to deliver good performance isn't exactly the easiest thing to do. Since the Overwatch Precision D.A.T. V2 trigger is the right trigger for my Roland Special build, I wasn't forced to choose a trigger from the myriad of options out there.

But was it a good trigger? Was this part as carefully selected as the rest of the parts that make up the Roland Special? My gut tells me that it probably was. The Overwatch Precision D.A.T. V2 came with the trigger shoe installed on a factory Glock Gen 3 trigger bar. I had selected the black shoe with the black safety, but rest assured that they do triggers in a ton of different color combinations if that is your thing. Even pumpkin spice, because even a basic b**ch needs a good trigger right?

The trigger arrived in a simple plastic clamshell that featured the trigger and trigger bar assembly nicely. There was also an awesome sticker that now lives on my laptop.
The trigger arrived in a simple plastic clamshell that featured the trigger and trigger bar assembly nicely. There was also an awesome sticker that now lives on my laptop.

Before installing the trigger I wanted to compare the Overwatch Precision D.A.T. V2 to some of the stock Glock triggers I had on hand at the time. The triggers below are arranged with a Gen 4 Glock 19 trigger on top, the Overwatch Precision D.A.T. V2 in the middle, and a factory Glock 17 Gen 4 trigger on the bottom. You can clearly see when comparing the faces of the trigger that the D.A.T. V2 offers far more surface areas for the pad of your finger, something I really appreciate as a shooter. I also quite liked the extra wide trigger safety as I am not a fan of the really thin types used on some pistols. I find that the wider trigger dingus makes the trigger feel less segmented and more complete.

The triggers below are arranged with a Gen 4 Glock 19 trigger on top, the Overwatch Precision D.A.T. V2 in the middle, and a factory Glock 17 Gen 4 trigger on the bottom.
The triggers below are arranged with a Gen 4 Glock 19 trigger on top, the Overwatch Precision D.A.T. V2 in the middle, and a factory Glock 17 Gen 4 trigger on the bottom.
Looking at the pins used to keep everything together we see that where Glock used solid pins and polymer tension to keep thing put, Overwatch Precision has elected to use some coil pins that offer a far more secure fit when dealing with aluminum parts.
Looking at the pins used to keep everything together we see that where Glock used solid pins and polymer tension to keep thing put, Overwatch Precision has elected to use some coil pins that offer a far more secure fit when dealing with aluminum parts.

You also start to get a sense of exactly how much the flat faced trigger shoe reduces the length of reach from the backstrap of the gun to the trigger face.

The trigger bars on each of the examples is extremely telling once you lay them side by side. When I ordered the Overwatch Precision D.A.T. V2 I selected the polished trigger bar instead of the NP3 coated part. Guess what, the polished trigger bar was even better than the homebrew polish job that Tom at TXT Custom Gun Works has performed on the Glock 19 Gen 4 trigger in the middle. The Glock 17 Gen 4 trigger on the far left is a factory part with no polishing done to it.

When I ordered the Overwatch Precision D.A.T. V2 I selected the polished trigger bar instead of the NP3 coated part.
When I ordered the Overwatch Precision D.A.T. V2 I selected the polished trigger bar instead of the NP3 coated part.

With the trigger installed in the gun, I have to admit that it looks like it is right at home. The tough design mates well with the all business exterior of the Glock 19 that has become a Roland Special. The trigger safety is rather prominent, so guess what isn't an issue with the D.A.T. V2?

The pistol discharging when dropped.

Overwatch Precision D.A.T. V2 Trigger features a prominent trigger safety, ensuring the pistol will remain drop safe.
Overwatch Precision D.A.T. V2 Trigger features a prominent trigger safety, ensuring the pistol will remain drop safe.

Out on the range, I found the trigger to perform every bit of as good as one might expect. The take up is minimal and a reasonably well-defined wall is very apparent even on a striker gun. does have a slightly spongy break with the wrong connector in it, but with the Glock minus connector, it is quite nice. There is no over travel stop on the trigger but that isn't much of a big deal since the basic design of the Glock regulates that overtravel for you.

I did find an improvement in split times with the Overwatch Precision D.A.T. V2 with splits on the same target now dropping into the mid teens and transitions between targets hovering around the quarter second mark. I believe this has a lot to do with the shortened trigger reach that the flat face shoe offers.

Out on the range, I found the trigger to perform every bit of as good as one might expect. The take up is minimal and a reasonably well-defined wall is very apparent even on a striker gun.
Out on the range, I found the trigger to perform every bit of as good as one might expect. The take up is minimal and a reasonably well-defined wall is very apparent even on a striker gun.

So would I buy an Overwatch Precision D.A.T V2 trigger again? Heck yeah! In fact, I have the same trigger installed on my Glock 43 that I have daily carried for a couple of years now and just placed an order for a Gen 5 trigger that will be used on my Glock 19X build that I am dubbing the RolandX. Call me a tacti-tard, but I sure do love how the gun feels with a red dot, some stipple work, a comp, and most importantly, an Overwatch Precision D.A.T. V2 trigger.

You can learn more about the D.A.T. V2 on the Overwatch Precision Website or the product page for the D.A.T. V2 Glock trigger.


About Patrick R.Patrick Roberts

Patrick is a firearms enthusiast that values the quest for not only the best possible gear setup, but also pragmatic ways to improve his shooting skills across a wide range of disciplines. He values truthful, honest information above all else and had committed to cutting through marketing fluff to deliver the truth. You can find the rest of his work on FirearmRack.com as well as on the YouTube channel Firearm Rack or Instagram at @thepatrickroberts.

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jdlconradRoy D.Patrick RobertsVanns40 Recent comment authors
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jdl
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jdl

The wider trigger safety decreases the effectiveness of that safety device. It is closer to each side of the trigger, thus exposing it to a higher probability that something protruding into the trigger guard will deactivate that safety. The narrow factory safety, being much farther from the edges of the trigger, have significantly less probability of being deactivated inadvertently. The flat trigger face may be preferred by some, but the “segmented” feel sounds more to me like a rationalization than a real advantage. A smooth trigger pull can be obtained on any Glock with a few minutes of polishing certain… Read more »

conrad
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conrad

I installed 2 Overwatch triggers in 2 Glocks, a Falx and a DAT – and that was on recommendation from this site 6 or 9 months ago. The shape of the triggers helped operate the guns, and I was happy to get away from the longitudinal play in the factory flipper.Trigger pull weight was not effected, but crispness and smoothness were enhanced.
I left my older Glocks alone as I couldn’t see enough of a reason to change them. Factory stock parts can be a good thing if you got a nice specimen, and also it depends on use.

Roy D.
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Roy D.

If I were a much younger person I might consider it. As it is I have my five Glocks all set up the same way: smooth triggers with minus connectors. That way they all feel the same whether it’s the 19,20,23,30 or 32. Works for me.

Mark Are
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Mark Are

Let’s see…I have a few Glocks in my collection and carry a G30 gen 3 for self defense. At $135 EACH for those fancy little triggers which do look like they would be cool, I’d have to come up with $3915 dollars to convert my collection to them. Gee…I think I’ll pass. Now when they get the price down to about $25, which is what it SHOULD be, or until a Chinese company copies it and sells it for $13.99 on Ebay with free shipping ( we have such a fair trade agreement going on with the Chinese, don’t we?)… Read more »

John
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John

Cheap bastard, your what is wrong with this country.

Vanns40
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Vanns40

Yeah but it’s everything right with what this country was built on, competition! Gotta love it! 🙂