Smith & Wesson Model 19 Classic .357 Magnum Revolver – Review

Smith & Wesson Model 19 Classic
Model 19 Classic

GRAND RAPIDS, MI USA -(Ammoland.com)- The .357 Magnum has always been a round that inspires confidence and Smith & Wesson’s Model 19 is a name that does the same. The two have been hand-in-hand since the mid 1950’s and have very famous names associated with them, such as Elmer Keith and Bill Jordan. The Model 19 became the ‘peace officer’s dream’ gun and it saw a long and storied history of use. Today we are going to take a look at S&W’s re-release of the historical gun in the form of the new Model 19 Classic.

There are many ways to look at guns like this in today’s world. The newbie and plastic fantastic lover may wonder why S&W would go through the effort to release a gun that is, on the outside, far behind in terms of technology, capacity, and weight. Lighter, faster, and softer-shooting guns are available everywhere, so why would a person consider dropping hard-earned cash on a vintage-styled six-gun?

Smith & Wesson Model 19 Classic
Smith & Wesson Model 19 Classic

The answer to this is simple: the past never really dies. There are those who look at the way things were and can’t understand the draw of those golden years. Many people are comfortable in the idea of the present, where new and exciting things are always happening. Rarely do they stop and ask themselves where they are being led. Then there are some of use that look at the past and see that it speaks of the times when lawmen knew everyone in town by name and reaching the moon was a dream worth pursuing. The guns of our peace officers are a sad commentary about the realities of living in a world often governed by feeling and not facts.

The lines of the Model 19 Classic take you back to those special days. It is very likely that your father or grandfather had a gun like this, albeit a first run sample. The six-gun is linked to the American spirit, and the .357 Magnum is inseparable from the national legends of gangsters, G-Men, hunters, and famous fighters. It could be said that the Model 19, and even the earlier Model 27, are equivalent to the Colt SAA in our most recent century. The .45 Colt was a standard for decades and achieved many great things, just as the .357 Magnum did in the decades after the old soldier lost popularity.

It should be no surprise to you now why Smith & Wesson chose to bring this gun back. Unlike many legacy guns, the Model 19 has some significant uses today. The .357 Mag has never lost effectiveness in any role that it has been used for, be it hunting, self-defense, target shooting, and law enforcement. There are likely thousands of officers across the country that still rely on this cartridge as a back-up.

The .357 Mag has never lost effectiveness in any role that it has been used for, be it hunting, self-defense, target shooting, and law enforcement.
The .357 Mag has never lost effectiveness in any role that it has been used for, be it hunting, self-defense, target shooting, and law enforcement.

The Model 19 Classic differs from the originals in several ways. It incorporates an integral trigger lock and a frame-mounted firing pin among other small changes. It is not a 1:1 copy of the original, but rather a modernized take. Just like the original, it has a beautiful blued finish and wooden grips. Overall, this is a solidly built revolver that has all the handling characteristics of those from years past.

The nice thing about this gun, as opposed to others made today, is that it takes advantage of a heavy barrel. The balance of this 37oz piece is great and making shots at 50 yards from a rest is easily done. The forward weight of the barrel helps to reduce muzzle jump and allows for fast and accurate close to medium range shooting. Many of these features were revolutionary at the time they were introduced, which is why the original Model 19 was so sought-after by lawmen.

The nice thing about this gun, as opposed to others made today, is that it takes advantage of a heavy barrel.
The nice thing about this gun, as opposed to others made today, is that it takes advantage of a heavy barrel.

For my review of this gun, I decided to test several .357 Magnum loads from some great manufacturers. I tested the loads for accuracy at 25 yards from a rest. Groups are the average of three, five-shot groups. Velocity results are the average of five shots taken over my Oehler 35P chronograph.

  • Hornady 125gr XTP———————————————————-1330fps, 2.5”
  • Hornady 135gr Critical Duty FTX——————————————-1225fps, 1.9”
  • Hornady 158gr XTP———————————————————–1212fps, 2.8”
  • Black Hills 125gr JHP———————————————————-1424fps, 1.75”
  • Black Hills 158gr JHP———————————————————-1200fps, 2.2”
  • HSM 158gr JSP——————————————————————1210fps, 1.75”
  • SIG SAUER 125gr FMJ———————————————————-1347fps, 2”

This gun was a pleasure to shoot and the accuracy was great coming from the 4.25” barrel. The trigger broke clean and I was impressed with how easy it was to make follow-up shots. The Hornady loads all did very well and I wouldn’t hesitate to carry any of them. The best performer among the Hornady ammo was the Critical Defense 135gr FTX. This is a load that I have fired quite a bit in the past and I think that it is a great balance in power and recoil.

The two Black Hills loads had much more snap than those from Hornady, but they made up for it with a bit more of a ring on the steel plates. I had no issues with accuracy at all with these two JHP loads and was very happy with how they felt in this wood-gripped gun.

SIG SAUER’s 125gr FMJ is a great practice round that is both accurate and affordable. I ended up putting the highest volume of this particular round through this gun and it ran great. The nice thing about it is that you can train with the affordable FMJ variant and carry the V-Crown JHP, which is identical in muzzle velocity and felt recoil.

The best performer among the Hornady ammo was the Critical Defense 135gr FTX. This is a load that I have fired quite a bit in the past and I think that it is a great balance in power and recoil.
The best performer among the Hornady ammo was the Critical Defense 135gr FTX. This is a load that I have fired quite a bit in the past and I think that it is a great balance in power and recoil.

The last load I tested was the HSM 158gr JSP. This is a classic bullet type and is very similar to some of the original .357 Magnum loads. This load was very, very mild in terms of recoil, but it delivered great accuracy and velocity. It had the least muzzle jump of any load tested.

I think that, at the end of the day, this is a gun for a very specific person. Many will shrug at it, but this is a solid gun that takes some of yesteryear and blends it with some of today’s features. Would I like to have a true, 100% replica without the internal lock and a fixed firing pin? Sure, who wouldn’t? However, the odds of finding a good condition example from the early years is very difficult. With this gun, you can have your vintage cake and eat it, too. I think that Smith & Wesson did a very good thing by bringing this classic back. If you wrap your hands around one at your local gun dealer, I’m sure you’ll agree with me.

For more information on the Model 19 Classic, go to www.smith-wesson.com. Ammunition used in this article can be seen at www.hornady.com, www.black-hills.com, www.sigsauer.com, and www.hsammunition.com.


About Josh WaynerJosh Wayner

Josh Wayner has been writing in the gun industry for five years. He is an active competition shooter with 14 medals from Camp Perry. In addition to firearms-related work, Josh enjoys working with animals and researching conservation projects in his home state of Michigan.

  • 64
    Leave a Reply

    Please Login to comment
    35 Comment threads
    29 Thread replies
    0 Followers
     
    Most reacted comment
    Hottest comment thread
    54 Comment authors
    Joe RussoDenman WeisT L ParkerChrisJack Recent comment authors
      Subscribe  
    Notify of
    Denman Weis
    Guest
    Denman Weis

    How do I buy this gun.

    Joe Russo
    Guest
    Joe Russo

    I just bought one at fin feather fur, in Ohio.

    Chris
    Guest
    Chris

    I have a model 19 with 3 inch barrel that my father trained me on for my first revolver 40 years ago. Bar none the best all purpose self defense, camp, hiking , target , and yes hunting pistol I’ve ever had, and yes I keep it mint.
    I put this revolver up there with my model 29 44mag
    Both are excellent revolvers from an era long gone by and thank you for the nice article!

    Jack
    Guest
    Jack

    I have a model 19 that was a California highway patrol commemorative from the 70s in a display box target hammer target Trigger very heavy Bluing beautiful Gun

    Chickowa
    Guest
    Chickowa

    JOSH! I KNOW THAT DUDE!

    Tom L
    Guest
    Tom L

    I’m glad I have a couple or real Model 19’s…The one’s without the sphincter on the side!

    Glock your mom down.
    Guest
    Glock your mom down.

    Bullshit, a 10mm with solid cast bullets will drop a big bear, and an engine block. 1911 for edc you must want to die early…ill bet good money that you also play the skin flute very effectively.

    G Dayton
    Guest
    G Dayton

    So will a cannon, , most inexperienced people don’t carry a cannon,, 99% don’t encounter bears,, people must choose according to their comfort level, next is good amo for that choice,, finally practice practice practice in all shooting ways. If you have to worry about bear encounters, , yes 10mm 44mag 12 ga slug 37mm on and on.

    Steve Horschover
    Guest
    Steve Horschover

    Bullshit no 10mm is gonna do a block. Whats your experiance with big bears? You are shit for brains if you think you are gonna take on a Brown bear with a 10mm. Better make sure the front sight is removed from your 10mm pop gun, coz its gonna hurt when a big Brownie shoves it up your ass.
    .338 Rem Ultra mag with 250 grain Nosler is ny minimum for Brown bear.
    Get a life, penis siphoner.

    kenneth
    Guest
    kenneth

    No need to redo what has already been said by others: “the 10mm cartridge delivers energy in the ranges of 500-750 ft. lbs. This is a far cry from the energy delivered by the above mentioned calibers. In the opinions of many an outfitter, guide and those far more experienced and knowledgeable on the matter than I, this is not sufficient to STOP an aggressive bear.” – https://loadoutroom.com/thearmsguide/10006-2/” This author only has 22 years of experience with hunting in Montana. I was born here, and have been hunting here since 1972. My 45+ years of experience agrees with both his… Read more »

    Wild Bill
    Guest
    Wild Bill

    @kenneth, Terrific article by Denny Ducet, and 6 interesting comments. Neat website.

    Carl
    Guest
    Carl

    Model 19 known as the Combat Revolver whereas police version was known as the Highway Patrol Revolver, was the Model 28!

    R. Smith
    Guest
    R. Smith

    I have the Model 13, also a very nice sidearm. The Military Police.

    Benjamin Hall
    Guest
    Benjamin Hall

    Not unlike others……had it, loved it, sold it…..what a BIG mistake…..never again!

    James A. "Jim" Farmer
    Guest
    James A. "Jim" Farmer

    Lake County Examiner, Lakeview, Oregon: Wednesday, February 10th, 2015/Letters To The Editor Gun Lesson Introduced jointly in 1935 by Smith and Wesson and Winchester, the .357 Magnum, originally designed by Major Doug Wesson, Phil Sharpe: a ballistician, and gun scribe writer Elmer Keith, is now 80. The .357 Magnum, and it’s parent caliber the .38 Special, were formerly the quintessential law enforcement handgun of the 20th century. Since mass conversion from revolvers to semi-automatic pistols commenced in the late 1980’s/ early 1990’s, revolvers seldom appear in cop’s holsters. However, the historic revolver remains laudable. Both .38 Special and .357 Magnum… Read more »

    James A. "Jim" Farmer
    Guest
    James A. "Jim" Farmer

    Klamarth Falls Herald and News: Tuesday, December 18th, 2012/Letters To The Editor Pop culture distorted, misrepresented the 1950’s. Marlen McGee’s Dec. 10 Herald and News letter laments the 1950’s as being so wonderful. Really? No decade has been more distorted and misrepresented by pop culture “American Graffiti” feel-good fluff as the 1950’s: burger shops, drive ins, roller skates, bobby socks and poodle skirts (whatever those were?), including plastic hula hoops. I was born in Klamath Falls in November 1956 and I faintly remember hula hoops being twirled by giggly girls. Remember the Korean War (1950-1953)? The World Book Encyclopedia states:… Read more »

    Bill
    Guest
    Bill

    I have a Model 19-3 and a Model 29-2. Paid $150
    for the 19-3 and $400 for the 29-2. Both are in
    very good condition. Sounds like I made good
    purchases. I will leave them to my grandson and
    granddaughter.

    Rokflyer
    Guest
    Rokflyer

    I luckily have my fathers mod 19 from 1975 vintage and a high quality mod 28 , the Highway Patrolman model 27, feel very lucky to have both weapons. I still enjoy carrying either in the back country. Even though my go to will always be the auto pistol I appreciate both.

    James
    Guest
    James

    Rokflyer.
    i also have the Highway Patrolman model 27, it shoots as good today as it always did.
    because i keep up the Maintenance on it.
    just hvn’t shot it much in over 5 yrards now.

    thehangman59
    Guest
    thehangman59

    Oops fellers a slight mix up, S%W mod 28 is the Highway Patrolman and mod 27 the standard production. The 27 had the deep bluing and target sights, while the 28 had a lesser finish and combat masterpiece front sight (at least the ones I have seen) The main difference being the 27 was polished and the 28 bead blasted and lacked the polishing.

    Mike
    Guest
    Mike

    Revolvers most definitely have a place in the age of plastic. Go to the range with a modern pistol that you shoot well, and find the guy with the revolver, who is shooting equally well. Ask to trade for 20 rounds or so and see what happens. More than likely, the rev guy will continue to shoot well, the plastic guy will struggle. Shooting a double action revolver, with their long, heavy trigger pull, makes you concentrate more on marksmanship. I am normally the only rev shooter at almost all local USPSA matches, and have handed my rev over to… Read more »

    Glock your mom down.
    Guest
    Glock your mom down.

    Bullshit, a 10mm with solid cast bullets will drop a big bear, and an engine block. 1911 for edc you must want to die early…ill bet good money that you also play the skin flute very effectively.

    kenneth
    Guest
    kenneth

    Wow! A glock fanbois who knows how to copy and paste! Color me impressed.
    Next, you can try to learn that just repeating the same story over and over doesn’t make it any more credible.

    James A. "Jim" Farmer
    Guest
    James A. "Jim" Farmer

    Lake County Examiner: Lakeview, Oregon: Wednesday, February 10th, 2015 Gun Lesson Lake County Examiner Feb 10, 2015 Introduced jointly in 1935 by Smith and Wesson and Winchester, the .357 Magnum, originally designed by Major Doug Wesson, Phil Sharpe: a ballistician, and gun scribe writer Elmer Keith, is now 80. The .357 Magnum, and it’s parent caliber the .38 Special, were formerly the quintessential law enforcement handgun of the 20th century. Since mass conversion from revolvers to semi-automatic pistols commenced in the late 1980’s/ early 1990’s, revolvers seldom appear in cop’s holsters. However, the historic revolver remains laudable. Both .38 Special… Read more »

    DaveW
    Guest
    DaveW

    Carried the S&W M&P K15 .38 for 20 years in military law enforcement. Never had a problem with them. My spouse gifted me with a S&W Mod 19 .357 in the mid 1970s. It’s just as good today as the day it came home. My only issue with revolvers is reloading. Having said that, it could be worse. Try reloading a Ruger Blackhawk .357 in a crunch.

    T L Parker
    Guest
    T L Parker

    Ahhh the model 15 combat masterpiece. I’ve had people tell me my K15 was useless in a fight, as it only had 6 rounds and they had as many as 15 rounds in their plastic semi autos. Hump !!! If I have to shoot more than 3 rounds from my K15 (two to chest and one to head), I will be leaving the area. I love my model 15. Carried it to many places and walked away alive. I am 71 and it will remain in my family hopefully forever. Oh, had it tweaked by George Roghaar Gun Refinishing, in… Read more »

    James A. "Jim" Farmer
    Guest
    James A. "Jim" Farmer

    Klamath Falls Herald and News : Tuesday, December 18th, 2012/Letters To The Editor Pop culture distorted, misrepresented the ’50s Marlen McGee’s Dec. 10 Herald and News letter laments the 1950s as being so wonderful. Really? No decade has been more distorted and misrepresented by pop culture “American Graffiti” feel-good fluff as the 1950s: burger shops, drive ins, roller skates, bobby socks and poodle skirts (whatever those were?), including plastic hula hoops. I was born in Klamath Falls in November 1956 and I faintly remember hula hoops being twirled by giggly girls. Remember the Korean War (1950-1953)? The World Book Encylopedia… Read more »

    ROY
    Guest
    ROY

    I have owned three model 19s in my life time, loved the them. They were built on a “k” frame, same as the target k-38, and k-22s I did have a problem with one as the “hot” loads I was shooting swelled the cylinder, Smith rebuilt the gun and sent it back to me at no charge. I then went to the model28 highway patrol model

    Mervin w Crowe
    Guest
    Mervin w Crowe

    sw 642modle 38 2inch

    Mervin w Crowe
    Guest
    Mervin w Crowe

    sw 38 model642 tp

    Tom Miller
    Guest
    Tom Miller

    I own a model 19-5 with a 2 1/2 inch barrel. It is my everyday carry, and I wouldn’t sell it or trade it.

    Jerry L. Gentry
    Guest
    Jerry L. Gentry

    I have 2 K frame, Model 13-4. One has never been fired. The other has about two hundred rounds fired.
    Both are excellent condition. BNY9811 AND BNY9809. Bought in August, 1993.
    Any interest anywhere? I am 83. My wife hates guns.
    J L Gentry

    Joe Desmond
    Guest
    Joe Desmond

    ,check yeah, I would love to own those guns, let me k now if for SALE. I,WOULD BUY BOTH. JOE

    Lou Amely
    Guest
    Lou Amely

    Hi Jerry,
    Do you still have those puppy’s. The mod 13 use to come with a round but Is the one you have similar.
    What would be asking for it.

    Lou Amely
    Hollywood FL

    Philip Conrad
    Guest
    Philip Conrad

    S & W brought out the L frame because of the K frame’s durability problems shooting heavy .357 loads. Certainly the original Model 19 was a very nice revolver, I own one, but to overlook ithat deficiency while praising it seems juvenile. The new Model 19 was introduced by S&W most likely to appeal to perhaps older generation revolver lovers wishing to recapture a bit of simpler times and enhance their Luddite mindset. Obviously their bean counters calculated there was a sufficient number of such individuals out there so as to turn a profit, and not to just slobber in… Read more »

    J.D. Carpanzano
    Guest
    J.D. Carpanzano

    I had an original Model 19 years ago positively loved it. I sold it for a song, can’t fathom why but I stupidly did. I saw the fellow I sold it to not long ago. Told him I’d buy it back whatever the asking price, he naturally said he’d never part with it. A different one just wouldn’t be the same so I guess my grandson won’t get one in my collection when I go. I’ll always kick myself for selling it.

    Brad
    Guest
    Brad

    As a gun dealer since 2003 I have heard that story, in some form, at least 100 times from my locals alone. Lots of regret out there on these and the “Snake” guns.

    Raymond F Miller
    Guest
    Raymond F Miller

    You aren’t alone when it comes to regretting guns you’ve sold over the years. I have several of them that I ask myself all of the time WHY did I sell that gun, oh well.

    David E
    Guest
    David E

    WHY why when doing a review do you not include the Price of the model you are reviewing price is important issue when considering a purchase.

    matthew phillips
    Guest
    matthew phillips

    I have a 70’s model 19. To the guy who said revolvers aren’t accurate- that’s because you’re shooting a SNS… snubbies aren’t meant for accuracy beyond mugger range. To the guy who wants an old school one, I actually bought mine in trade because my lgs wouldn’t pay me what I wanted for my Shield. Guy there had a 19, wanted a semi. We traded straight up, with a box of ammo each. It drills nails, and wife can shoot it loaded with .38s.

    Paul Wilson
    Guest
    Paul Wilson

    I have carried a 19-5 since I was 21 years old. Over the years nothing that I have used or owned has measured up to it! In my opinion it is one of the greatest firearms ever designed.

    Enrico L. Appiano
    Guest
    Enrico L. Appiano

    I have a model 27 and model 29, condition 99.99%.
    They are just beautiful!!

    roger purcella
    Guest
    roger purcella

    I own a model 19-5 it is a pleasure to shoot I inherited from a late father who had it as long as I could remeber. This pistole is very nice shooter no issues at all love it the man who don’t like revolvers needs to get a good one and shot it semi autos are nice i own and have built several but the revolver has a place and it is while hunting or in the case of my taurus model 85 in 357 with a two and a quarter inch barrel it concealed very well and shot very… Read more »

    Ed Curtis
    Guest
    Ed Curtis

    Bought my 1St Mod.19 in 1967 while at CHP academy for $165. 1 carried this everyday for 7-8 years, then as a duty weapon for another 11. At that point I bought the SS model. I just passed my original to my oldest son. The only modifications made to this weapon were Pachmyor grips and a 4″ barrel from the original required 6″. The longer barrel is slightly better at distance, but the shorter one is superior overall as a defensive weapon. I still have a 636 SS model as an occasional carry, but I have gone modern with a… Read more »

    revjen45
    Guest
    revjen45

    If I were in the market for such a sidearm I would find an older example model without the Clinton lock. Maybe they are hard to find, but it would be worth it.

    David Fenn
    Guest
    David Fenn

    Not very hard to find actually…they can be found on GunBroker quite easily.

    Quintessential Phorto
    Guest
    Quintessential Phorto

    WTH is a “Clinton” lock? Why does the trigger need to be “locked”?

    Matt
    Guest
    Matt

    I have a Model 19-2 and 19-4 both guns are a pleasure to shoot.
    I have shot many different loads through them, commercial and hand loads, without incident.

    Great guns. Plan to leave them to my grandson.

    REM1875
    Guest
    REM1875

    Originals were reputed to have a frame cracking problem with 125 gr bullets……how was this remedied??? I retired mine as soon as I got a Model 28 …..

    Perry Marchigiani
    Guest
    Perry Marchigiani

    I have a model 28/357 1 of my 1st. Guns 21/08/1974 it is in my safe. Perry

    Wayne Clark
    Guest
    Wayne Clark

    It was remedied by the 686 & 619. The forcing cone was what took the damage with the hotter loads. Usually the 158g bullets didn’t cause the cone to crack but the later models were beefed up to take the hotter loads. I have a 66 no dash that’s the 19s SS brother. Great gun as well.

    Roy D.
    Guest
    Roy D.

    “It was remedied by the 686 & 619.”
    Apples and oranges.

    Roy D.
    Guest
    Roy D.

    It wasn’t the frames cracking it was the forcing cones splitting. The high velocity 125gr loads were hitting the forcing cone at a much higher velocity than the 158 gr JHP loads. Choose your rounds accordingly.

    Tom Marshall
    Guest
    Tom Marshall

    Hello, Each time I see a write up re all the neat features of a revolver. It always puzzles me. I guess it may depend what you may have as a reason for owning one. Or more. I have several semi auto pistols that I target shoot regularly. Made by CZ, S&W, RUGER and Remington. And, I do have one S&W J frame snubbie. Can’t say it is either accurate or fun to shoot. To me revolvers poorly compare with pistols when you consider cost, concealability, trigger pull, accuracy, weight and more. Like high weight. Any nostalgia factor is easy… Read more »

    John
    Guest
    John

    Not trying to change your mind, just trying to answer your question. I have a Model 19 and a 586. My everyday carry is a Ruger LCP with self defense rounds. Why? Because it is super easy to carry wherever I go. I always have it with me, and that is the key trait of a cc firearm. I keep the the 19 under the seat of my car with 2 speed loaders. If something more serious is going on I would like to have the additional fire power and accurate range of the 19. I keep the 586 by… Read more »

    Wild Bill
    Guest
    Wild Bill

    @Tom Marshall, I kind of agree with you regarding snub nose revolvers. I like the snub nose concept, but don’t care for the snub nose result. And they are tiny in my hands. Having said that I have several snubbys, and many other revolvers around the house … each is loaded. I also have many other magazine fed weapons around the house … none of them loaded. I just can not get over that “loading up a magazine, and leaving it for years doesn’t weaken the mag spring” concept. I am reliably informed that leaving the magazines fully loaded for… Read more »

    Chuckbone56
    Guest
    Chuckbone56

    @Wils Bill, I have several auto loaders to carry and much like you dont care to leave the magazines loaded when not in use. My one snubbie is always loaded. I want a larger revolver but havent found her yet.

    durabo
    Guest
    durabo

    Despite my duty carry 1911 and my concealed carry KDs, my favorite while bow-hunting in Arizona in beer country is my trusty old Model 19.

    Michael Mc
    Guest
    Michael Mc

    I am sure it was a typo…or maybe not… but for safety sake, once I am getting deep into beer country I tend to keep my firearms locked up

    Wild Bill
    Guest
    Wild Bill

    @durabo, “… bow-hunting in Arizona in beer country… ” That is a most humorous pun and does not take away from your point! I sure hope that it was intentional.

    durabo
    Guest
    durabo

    @ Wild Bill, it was a serendipitous pun, caused by Autocorrect, which has become my worst enema. Yes, it’s indeed BEER country, but after sundown, in camp.

    Steve
    Guest
    Steve

    I have a 70’s vintage Model 19. It has custom S&W wooden grips and is in mint condition. It is indeed a sweet shooter and I plan to keep it forever.

    Terry Johnson
    Guest
    Terry Johnson

    Do it. Mine was lost in a robbery and I’ll never get it back. Could buy another but won’t be the same. I had Pachmayr grips on mine. Nothing I have now gives me a hard on like my combat mag. did.

    Duane
    Guest
    Duane

    A mid weight 357 revolver is about as perfect all around handgun one carry.