Ruger Introduces Three Rifles Chambered in the All-New .350 Legend

Ruger Introduces Three Rifles Chambered in the All-New .350 Legend
Ruger Introduces Three Rifles Chambered in the All-New .350 Legend

U.S.A.-(Ammoland.com)- Sturm, Ruger & Company, Inc. (NYSE-RGR) proudly introduces three rifles chambered in Winchester’s all-new .350 Legend cartridge: two Ruger American Ranch rifles and one AR-556 MPR. These new rifles give hunters and shooters a variety of options to use this exciting new cartridge in both traditional bolt-action and modern sporting rifle configurations.

“We heard our customers loud and clear, and are proud to answer their call,” said Ruger President and CEO Chris Killoy. “We anticipate the woods of Indiana, Iowa, Michigan, Ohio and many other states will be full of new Ruger rifles this fall.”

Rifles chambered in .350 Legend are not exclusively destined for the so-called “straight-wall states.” The cartridge combines impressive muzzle energy with low recoil, making it a good match for both the lightweight Ruger American Ranch Rifle and feature-rich AR-556 MPR. The cartridge is available in a variety of hunting, subsonic and target loads, inviting plenty of trigger time with Ruger’s new .350 Legend rifles.

Ruger American Rifle
Ruger American Rifle

Since its launch in 2012, the Ruger American Rifle has earned a reputation for outstanding accuracy and reliability, and the .350 Legend is a natural fit for the platform. This new chambering is offered in both standard (13.75”) and compact (12.50”) lengths of pull to fit most shooters, while the ergonomic stock and soft recoil pad ensure comfortable shooting. The 16.38” cold hammer-forged barrel features a 1:16” twist rate and is capped with ½”-28 muzzle threads and thread protector. A 5-round metal AR-style magazine, one-piece Picatinny scope base, Ruger Marksman Adjustable™ trigger and ambidextrous tang safety complete the package.

The AR-556 MPR has proven to be an excellent hunting platform, and the .350 Legend chambering expands that role. The nitrided 16.38” barrel is capped with a ½”-28 radial port muzzle brake. The rifle’s appeal is enhanced by the combination of a Ruger® Elite 452® AR-Trigger, Magpul® furniture and a 15” free-float handguard. Magpul M-LOK® accessory attachment slots make the addition of a sling or bipod easy. With less recoil, and weighing almost a pound less than its .450 Bushmaster counterpart, the MPR chambered in .350 Legend is a fantastic hunting option.

For more information on Ruger rifles chambered in .350 Legend, or to learn more about the extensive line of award-winning Ruger firearms, visit Ruger.com or Facebook.com/Ruger. To find accessories Ruger rifles chambered in .350 Legend and other Ruger firearms, visit ShopRuger.com or your local independent retailer of Ruger firearms.


About Sturm, Ruger & Co., Inc.
Ruger Firearms

Sturm, Ruger & Co., Inc. is one of the nation's leading manufacturers of rugged, reliable firearms for the commercial sporting market. As a full-line manufacturer of American-made firearms, Ruger offers consumers almost 700 variations of more than 40 product lines. For 70 years, Ruger has been a model of corporate and community responsibility. Our motto, “Arms Makers for Responsible Citizens®,” echoes our commitment to these principles as we work hard to deliver quality and innovative firearms.

  • 55 thoughts on “Ruger Introduces Three Rifles Chambered in the All-New .350 Legend

    1. Just bought 10 boxes of 350 Jacketed from Midway 2 day delivery. love .357 max. I think the 350 legend should be close to the 357 max reloading. cannot find loading data for Legend yet. bought steel dies from Lee, factory crimp die not yet available from Lee. Ruger Ranch rifle will be here any day now. Have been wanting a .357 max chambered rifle for years. Have contender in .357 max.

      1. There is quite a bit of data out there for 357 AR which is made from Starline 223 Basic brass trimmed to 1.6″ long.

        I would think the 357 AR data will get you headed in the right direction. Both cartridges seat a similar diameter bullet close to the maximum overall length that will fit into an AR15 magazine.
        The 357 AR is discussed here.
        https://mdws.forumchitchat.com/?forum=645266
        Load data is found here…………..
        https://mdws.forumchitchat.com/post/357ar-load-data-thread-9599562?&trail=50

    2. Just got a Ruger American in 350 legend at Randys gun shop in Badaxe Mich. Paid $449.99 plus tax. Got it on 4/26/19. 20 round boxes of full Metal jacket ammo to sight it in were only $10.00 each. Topped it of with 3×9 Bushnell scope and bore sighted it in. Can’the wait to try it out. People at Randys were very helpful and friendly always great service.

    3. I owned a 1894c in 357 mag once and loved it. Fun. The time with that setup has had me looking for years into an auto loading carbine in .35/9mm. I have always liked the mini 14 and would love to see some varient chambered in this. The AR platforms look sweet but I still like a classic profile stock on my guns. Also can’t wait to see what custom loads come out. How about Hornady 147gr ftp or140 gr fxt? Or a real comparison 158 gr load.

    4. Finally a rimless 357 MAXIMUM! I spent a lot of time a few years ago talking to Savage and Ruger to make a 357 Max rimless to run in auto rifles and in bolt guns. Hopefully the 1:16 twist supports heavy bullets at 880-980 fps. I had a custom BLM fast twist 16″ TC barrel made on the 357 MAX. Can’t wait for dies and brass. I’ll get the a bolt rifle and 2 uppers. One 6″-8″ for my SBR and one @16″ ish for the rest of my lowers. The 350 legend is a real 300BLK killer, which has horrid SD and ES. My 357 max loads have 2 diget ES.

      1. I like the 350 really well for its purpose. To hunt deer in straight-wall states. (Very nice). But in order to be a 300 BLK killer it would have to use the same mags as the 556 like the 300 BLK does. So my question is can you use the 556 mags in the 350? I may be wrong, but I don’t think that will line up? Correct me if I’m wrong because I’m not sure? So-if it won’t allow you to use the same mags, and go from subsonic to supersonic as needed in the same gun, with the same mags as our most common 556 military round it won’t likely kill the 300 BLK. Kinda close but really two different things.

        1. I was curious about this too. Unfortunately no.. you can’t use standard unmodified AR mags. They have guides on the inside that go where the bottleneck is. (Think where the indent is pressed in on the side wall along the length of a steel mag). Now, on a polymer mag they are just extra plastic on the inside, so you can take them apart and grind the extra plastic out and then use them solely for this cartridge. I was bummed when I found this out too… The thought of having a magpul D60 with 60 rounds of .357 on tap got me very, VERY excited lol

    5. Interesting round. I may have to get a Ruger American in this caliber for the grand-kids as they grow into deer sized rifles. Plenty of punch at reasonable ranges without excessive recoil. Perfect for the kiddo’s. Like a straight walled .35 Remington.

    6. Going to get me one as soon as I save up the pennies for it. 350 Legend will put the 300 blk out out of business, along with several others along that line. .357 caliber bullets easy to get and reload.

      1. 350 Legend will require modifications to AR mags. 300 Blackout will remain a staple due to it’s use in the military as well as the ability for it to be a pistol/truck firearm in the “new” MSR pistols

        1. It’s not illegal. It is however heavily regulated, and does require an FFL and special operating tax, as well as ITAR requirements. It’s expensive, and time consuming, but not illegal.

    7. Unless you’re on public land, hunters in Indiana can use anything from 243 Win up. I already have my 45 Colt Puma, which can handle hot loads nearing 44 Mag.

      1. The bore is spec’d at .357
        Odd? Yes, but there is an advantage .358 dia bullets can be used, but powder charges will need to be worked up carefully.
        .357s are fine, and it should shoot even . 356/355s jackets bullets accurately.
        Your average .358 bore .357 mag/max can’t shoot .355 bullets worth a damn.

    8. Why are manufacturers making a .355 caliber barrel with 1/2″x28 threading? CMMG did this too. All of my muzzle devices for .308 are 5/8″x24, and the whole reason I’d be considering 350 Legend over a 450 Bushmaster would be to use the 9mm suppressor that I already own. Almost all of the 1/2″x28 accessories are .22 cal, so you almost have to get a thread adapter. The only one doing it “right” is KAK, but I haven’t seen them in stock yet…

    9. Such a huge fail. All they had to do was take the rim off of a .357 max. Now we have proprietary chambers and thus dies, .355 bullets instead of the existing great choices in .357 / .358. And a rebated rim which can be less reliable.
      Uhhhh, no.

      1. more choices is never a bad thing I read the same comments about the 6.5 Creedmoor when it came out about the 6 mm Creedmoor and just about every other cartridge that’s ever been introduced while I’ve been alive 60 years why don’t you wait and see before you reply with ignorance you’re entitled to your opinion but it’s not valid until the cartridge has been out for a long time the market will just tell us whether it’s a good choice or not not you

        1. More cartridges equals innovation. Eventually things get panned out and we find out 30/65 cartridges(example) engineered are most practical and out work their neighboring cartridge.

        2. John, Danny Landrum is right, and you are entitled to your ignorant opinion. Rebated rims in autoloaders tend to be less reliable. Then using .355″ bullets leaves handloaders with only 9mm and .380acp bullets to choose from, or buy the ungodly expensive new special bullets that are nothing more than .357/.358 bullets swaged down. Yeah, Ruger recreated a 357Max for AR use. Yes the hunters in the phuked up Straight Wall case states will benefit, providing they can afford to shell out for a new underpowered rifle that only good under 200yds.
          I’m glad to be living in the free state of TX where ignorant politicians limit my cartridge choices to elongated pistol cartridges. I’m not bashing the 357 Max, I actually own a 10″ T/C, a 8″ Dan Wesson Supermag, and reamed the chamber on a NEF Handi-rifle .357mag. Ballistics almost identical to a .30-30, BUT it has it’s limitations you must know and live with. It will not replace my ..30-06 or 7mm-08.

      2. I’ve been hunting with a .284 Win rifle for many years. That cartridge has a rebated rim. Not one failure to extract or eject or anything else. “Less reliable” is a myth.

      3. You can use a .358 projectile in this casing.
        Rebates rims are for semi auto, for better feeding. This was designed for that.
        Did you even bother to research this round at all? Or just blast some hate here?

      4. Not sure where you are getting your info but it most certainly does use .357 diameter projectiles. I just looked up the cartridge blueprints on saami. The rim is not rebated. It is a standard 556 case that has not been necked down to form a shoulder. All standard componets. It’s a touch longer than 357 max so it’s got a tad more capacity. The brass will also be considerably harder since it isn’t based off of a cartridge designed to run only 35k psi and you aren’t removing material by turning down the rim.

      5. Agree with the idea of the 357 max, though when it is all said and done, its pretty much the same thing, with the Legend case being about .1″ longer. That said, the bullet diameter IS 357, therefore 357/358 can be used. Also, it is not a rebated rim, literally using the existing 223 line, pulling the brass before it is necked. When it comes to ammo availability, there is going to be far more brass in this than any 357 max has ever had… EVER. I’m curious if a 5.56 with its thicker brass might fireform and be trimmed to fit ???
        This round is a brilliant round, its just embarrassing to me, knowing it took winchester ?3+? years to figure this simple 223 modified design out!
        The only thing I haven’t seen a lot of data on yet – ballistics and accuracy. Time will tell, but this is the best straightwall option offered for the AR-15 yet! The others have too much recoil/power, along with reliability of the rebated rims. Agree/disgree, I dont care. All I know is, the 350 Legend will knock the same deer down at 250 yards as the 50 beowulf, the 450 Bushmaster, along with the 45-70, 444, 454 casull, etc. yet the Legend will have only a fraction of the recoil.

      6. Not sure where you got your specs from but I just read both the Winchester press release for .350 and the SAAMI spec sheet and both sources list a .357 bullet diameter. That would be awesome news for reloaders who would be able to utilize their stock of bullets for .38/.357/9mm for their AR. Even better news for bullet casters as it sounds like the velocities will be mild enough to allow cast boolits to be run. The rebated rim is because of the usage of .223 as the parent case. That means that eventually shooters will be able to purchase an upper or barrel only and cost effectively add another caliber to their stable.
        Not all “newfangled” calibers should be immediately poo-poo’d. This one seems like it will fill a lot of niches.

    10. Have a Ruger in 450 Bushmaster, love it, sure would be nice to be able to get ammo for it. I see the same problem for the 350 Legend. Manufacturers sale a weapon and we play hell finding ammo. Brilliant!

      1. Learn to reload, after reading some of the comments and doing some research myself and being a reloader. You do use a .355 diameter bullet (you can cast your own as well). You can also resize .223 brass (liable to split case necks if brass is tired but .223 is plentiful and cheap). So look at other options. Myself I don’t on the band wagon of new caliber fads. I stick to tried and proven, and tweak my loads for performance. I still shoot 8mm mauser, .308, 7.62x54R, and your good old fashion AK round instead of .300 blackout. And I reload and cast for all, both bolt guns and semi autos.

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