Remington Introduces New Firearm, Not A Pistol, Rifle, or Shotgun

870 Security shotgun above, 870 Tac 14 Firearm below

By Dean Weingarten

Dean Weingarten
Dean Weingarten

Arizona – -(Ammoland.com)-The BATFE ruling that firearms that are more than 26 inches in length, but are not manufactured to be fired from the shoulder, are neither pistols or shotguns or rifles, but merely “firearms” has resulted in a new type of defensive firearm.

The Remington Tac 14 is now available and has suggested retail price of $443.05. Store prices will likely be in the $400 range.

These type of firearms have been produced by small manufacturers for years. Two years ago, I predicted that the major manufacturers would come on board, if the small manufacturers proved popular.

At that time, I had not considered a Donald Trump Presidency. From the article two years ago:

The usual sequence is that when small manufacturers find a profitable market, large manufactures start production of their own models to take advantage of it. I will be watching to see if Mossberg or other large firms start offering pistol grip 12 gauge firearms of similar configurations.

It is an interesting time, and I believe the end result will be reform of federal gun laws, to something far more rational and less burdensome than now exists.

The Trump Presidency has created a more firearms friendly legal environment. Both Mossberg and Remington have come out with this type of legal firearm.  These firearm models make a mockery of the entire silly NFA regulatory scheme. From the previous article:

These short guns firing shotgun shells have obvious self defense applications.  There is no reason why these guns should be treated any different than ordinary pistols.   Functionally, they are either large pistols or small shotguns.   Both shotguns and pistols are constitutionally protected by the Heller and McDonald decisions.   There is no valid reason for treating these firearms any differently than other shotguns or pistols.

Except for the legacy issues created by the NFA, GCA1968, FOPA and the various BATFE letter rulings.    Those are what puts the ATF in a box, and why they are reported to be sweating.. dare I say it.. bullets.

David Hardy sums it up well:

Every shotgun but the diminutive .410 has a bore greater than half an inch. The “sporting purpose” exemption doesn’t apply, since that is limited to shotguns, and as we have seen, these firearms are not “shotguns” under the definitions of the NFA. 

The situation as it stands is thus: BATF must never have realized that these firearms are NFA “destructive devices,” and as a result thousands, if not millions, are in private possession of persons who bought them legitimately over the counter, with no reason to suspect that there was anything legally amiss.

The mere pictures of the above firearms show how arcane and irrational national firearms law has become.   There are people in jail for possession of firearms that are no different, functionally, from what the ATF has ruled do not require $200 taxes and do not fall under the NFA.

The next logical step would be for these firearms to sport arm braces, that have already been ruled as legal for pistols.  Here is an example from Black Aces Tactical:

Notice that it uses a Sig arm brace (not a stock) and receiver extension to make the ATF length requirement of more than 26 inches.  The 10 round detachable magazine is quite interesting.  H/T to Guns.com.  Another model has the same receiver extension, except that the extension folds.

How long before Remington or Mossberg offers arm braces? Neither companies’ representatives at the NRA Annual meeting were willing to speculate.

A logical evolution would be a semi-auto version. It is noteworthy that the Remington V3 shotgun has no operating parts in the shoulder stock.  The recoil springs are under the barrel, allowing for a pistol grip stock to be functional. Will we see a Remington semi-auto firearm a little over 26 inches in length, based on the V3?  Only time will tell.

The future regulation of short barreled shotguns (SBS) and short barreled rifles (SBR) is on shaky ground.

©2017 by Dean Weingarten: Permission to share is granted when this notice is included.

Link to Gun Watch

 

About Dean Weingarten:

Dean Weingarten has been a peace officer, a military officer, was on the University of Wisconsin Pistol Team for four years, and was first certified to teach firearms safety in 1973. He taught the Arizona concealed carry course for fifteen years until the goal of constitutional carry was attained. He has degrees in meteorology and mining engineering, and recently retired from the Department of Defense after a 30 year career in Army Research, Development, Testing, and Evaluation.

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Joe Black
Joe Black
4 years ago

Totally different than sawing off the barrel of a shotgun to make it a weapon of mass destruction, lol. Dont wait on this to get legalized and dont get caught with it.

Doug
Doug
4 years ago

That is the million dollar question… because it will then be an unregistered NFA item and they would probably give you a grace period to get them registered before they become illegal. (like back in 68)

Louie
Louie
4 years ago

What happens if these guns are banned down the road…..Are we grandfathered in or do we have to turn them in !!!!

explainist
explainist
4 years ago

It is not AOW because it was made that way. It is neither a shotgun nor sawed off:
https://www.ammoland.com/2017/03/asylum-weaponry-gatekeeper-ii-weapon/

Dan Griffin
Dan Griffin
4 years ago

I’m a little confused. Why would this not be considered an AOW subject to NFA and $5 tax stamp?

mike
mike
2 years ago
Reply to  Dan Griffin

because no one likes to pay more taxes

Doug
Doug
4 years ago

Mossberg has already had the 500 version of this in both a kit form (to convert their pistol grip only models) and as a firearm for over 2 years now and came out with the 930 version a few moths ago. The only problem is neither is offered with screw in chokes (threaded barrel) to attach a suppressor to. Hopefully Remington will offer this.

Gary Howell
Gary Howell
4 years ago

I hope 20 gauge follow the 12. As an older person the lighter weight of a 20 would be appreciated. A 20 with recoil reduced slugs would be a thumper the older fella could master with ease.

dj
dj
4 years ago

And just where are all those Evil crime statistics that those SBS and SBRs commit simply by being a “certain” length?
Well……… ummm, there aren’t any. And reason to add them the elimination of registration to the HPA.
And if you haven’t called your congresscritter recently, now is a good time to let them know that you are out there.
If and mostly WHEN the HPA passes, lots of nifty cans and this SBS would make a superb truck gun all for the taking OTC ……