Maine: Pro-Suppressor Legislation Passes Legislature; Signed by Governor into Law

Maine: Pro-Suppressor Legislation Passes Legislature; Signed by Governor into Law
Maine: Pro-Suppressor Legislation Passes Legislature; Signed by Governor into Law

Augusta, ME – On Tuesday, June 8th, Governor Janet Mills (D-ME) signed Senator Trey Stewart’s (R – Aroostook) L.D. 635 into law, thus repealing the requirement to obtain a permit from the Maine Department of Inland Fisheries and Wildlife (IFW) before hunting with a firearm suppressor in The Pine Tree State. Her signature comes less than a week after both chambers of the Maine Legislature passed the pro-suppressor legislation unanimously.

As is standard in Maine, the new law will take effect 90 days after the end of the current legislative session. If the legislature adjourns as it is currently scheduled to on June 16th, hunters in Maine will be able to use their suppressors in the field without the additional state permit beginning Tuesday, September 14th.

The American Suppressor Association would like to thank Sen. Stewart for sponsoring and championing this common-sense reform, as well as Gov. Mills and every member of the legislature for showing the world that there are pro-gun bills that Republicans and Democrats alike can agree on. We would also like to thank the Department of Inland Fisheries and Wildlife, the Congressional Sportsmen’s Foundation, and the National Rifle Association for their support of LD 635.

Thanks to your collective work, the hunting experience in Maine will soon be safer.



There are many benefits to using a suppressor, including:

HEARING PROTECTION

Noise induced hearing loss and tinnitus are two of the most common afflictions for recreational shooters and hunters. Everyone knows that gunfire is loud, but very few people understand the repercussions that shooting can have on their hearing until it’s too late. Suppressors reduce the noise of a gunshot by an average of 20 – 35 dB, which is roughly the same as earplugs or earmuffs. By decreasing the overall sound signature, suppressors help to preserve the hearing of recreational shooters, hunters, and hunting dogs around the world.

SAFER HUNTING

Most hunters do not wear hearing protection in the field because they want to hear their surroundings. The trouble is, exposure to even a single unsuppressed gunshot can, and often does, lead to permanent hearing damage. Suppressors allow hunters to maintain full situational awareness, while still protecting their hearing. The result is a safer hunting experience for the hunter, and for those nearby.

NOISE COMPLAINTS

As urban development advances into rural areas, shooting ranges and hunting preserves across the country are being closed due to noise complaints. Although it can still be heard, suppressed gunfire helps mitigate noise complaints from those who live near shooting ranges and hunting land.

ACCURACY

Suppressors reduce recoil, and help decrease muzzle flinch. These benefits lead to improved accuracy, better shot placement, and more humane hunts.

Although legal in 42 states, suppressors have been federally regulated since the passage of the National Firearms Act of 1934. Currently, prospective buyers must send in a Form 4 application to the ATF, pay a $200 transfer tax per suppressor, undergo the same process that is required to purchase a machine gun, and wait months for ATF to process and approve the paperwork. In stark contrast, many countries in Europe place little to no regulations on their purchase, possession, or use.


About the American Suppressor Association

The American Suppressor Association (ASA) is the unified voice of the suppressor community. We exist for one reason and one reason only: to fight for pro-suppressor reform nationwide.

The ability of the American Suppressor Association to fight for pro-suppressor reform is tied directly to our ability to fundraise. Since the ASA’s formation in 2011, 3 states have legalized suppressor ownership and 18 states have legalized suppressor hunting. Much of this would not have happened without your support. For more information on how you can join us in the fight to help protect and expand your right to own and use suppressors, visit www.AmericanSuppressorAssociation.com.American Suppressor Association

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ShortyStuff
ShortyStuff (@shorty)
5 months ago

States need to exercise the 10th Amendment and tell the Feds to go kick rocks. The 2nd Amendment states very simply “shall not be infringed” and the Feds are the biggest violators of the Constitution. We should all be able to purchase, possess, and carry any firearm and attachment we choose, whether it be a simple pistol all the way up to fully automatics and suppressors. The ATF does not have any constitutionally backed ability to restrict our firearm rights.

CourageousLion
CourageousLion (@wizardkiller)
5 months ago

We are the land of FREEDUMB!!! “In stark contrast, many countries in Europe place little to no regulations on their purchase, possession, or use.” Reminds me of a guy from Russia who was at a gun show and wanted to buy a M16 and found out you couldn’t. We hear about how Russia is so unfree but he claimed he could go to the town square on the weekend and buy a full auto AK with no problems. I can’t remember where in Russia he claimed he was from because my research tells me that Russia has all kinds of… Read more »

Docduracoat
Docduracoat (@glenhermanhotmail-com)
5 months ago

The Marines have just gone to giving every marine a suppressor.

JimmyS
JimmyS (@jimmys)
5 months ago

“Now that 1000 miles have been taken from you, we’re giving you two inches back. Now be grateful, and cheer this as a success! We’ll quietly strip you of those two inches and all the rest you have left shortly, so now is really the best time to celebrate your ‘victory.'”

Ryben Flynn
Ryben Flynn
5 months ago

The supersonic crack is what is heard with a suppressor and it is louder than the gunshot. That will scare off any game except the one you hit. With subsonic ammo any game will not hear a thing before dropping.