I Bought a Glock, But Not the T-Shirt

By Alan Murdock

Glockless
I Bought a Glock, But Not the T-Shirt

USA –-(Ammoland.com)- Everybody’s aware of “the Glock conflict,” the 30 year (argument, battle, war – insert your word of choice) over which combative handgun reigns supreme.

It almost sounds like we are on Food Networks Kitchen Stadium. “And today’s secret ingredient…. Handguns. Allez cuisine!”

During the 1980s and ‘90s, Glock became the most issued police pistol in the United States and was even adopted as a primary issue gun by the FBI.

I’ve been very interested in the videos that have come out for and against Glock in the last year. The competitive environment has heated up for Glock. First, Walther developed their P99 with guns hitting the market in 1997. Springfield Armory began importing their XD pistols in 2002 (known prior and imported since 2000 as the HS 2000).

More recently, Smith and Wesson have developed their M&P line. The gun was adopted by the Patrick County, Virginia Sheriff’s Department in 2005, according to a Smith & Wesson press release, and since that time it has been adopted as a primary issue sidearm or accepted as a personal carry gun by departments across the United States.

In my assessment, the era of Glock as the “only” choice in police or security markets, and thereby the choice for personal defense and concealed carry is long gone. With modern machining, all of the major manufacturers have developed successful, competitive lines of a defensive firearm. What is interesting to watch is the debate.

As I said, I have a Glock, but not the T-shirt.

I regularly carry either a Glock 23 or Smith & Wesson M&P compact in .40 cal. I switch between the two and like both, but I like my M&P a bit more. The features are more modern, the feel is great, the accuracy between my two guns is identical. The only question left is whether to get the Smith & Wesson T-shirt or hat.


About Alan Murdock

Alan Murdock is a lifelong shooting enthusiast. From youth he has shot firearms and archery. Today he is a certified NRA basic pistol instructor and Utah Concealed Firearms instructor. His blog on shooting and personal defense can be found at www.alanmurdock.wordpress.com

 

3 Comments
Inline Feedbacks
View all comments
Tom
Tom
9 years ago

"I Hate Glocks " was funny. Yet I believe both have valid points. I never knew about Glocks, their history and etc. When I bought my 27 (a .40 cal) I liked the simplicity while the others just looked ugly to me. I come back to my original argument "It's better to have something in your hand than nothing"

Heneryg
9 years ago

I love the "I hate Glocks" and he's so right! I don't like the feeling of having a Lego toy in my hand or something that feels like a greasy tupperware dish. and he's right about where the angle is way off, I feel like I should be bird hunting. No Thanks and all 9mm's should be Glocks only tells me that Police and law enforcement are saving a ton of money on a very cheap but fairly accurate plastic pistol, if those LEO's had to pay for the pistol they would still buy the Glock new at about $300.00… Read more »

EthanP
EthanP
9 years ago

I always hate the "which is best" arguments. Glocks are good. I would never argue that. I'm old fashioned in my prefrences. I like hammers,safetys etc' I would like to point out however, that a major selling point for Glock is price. They were always cheaper than Sigs & H&Ks, and S$W prior to the M&P couldn't really compete in quality. And Beretta M92s are BIG. Today a Glock is 1/2 the price of the Sigs and H&Ks. And Sigs polymers don't seem to be able to compete with Glock or the M&P. A major factor in organizational purchases, price.… Read more »