Below The Radar: The MICRO Act

microstamping
Below The Radar: The MICRO Act

New York – -(AmmoLand.com)- Any Second Amendment supporter has probably been aware of the famous 1976 quote by Nelson “Pete” Shields. They have probably used it at some point when trying to convince fellow Americans to oppose the unjust restrictions that anti-Second Amendment extremists seek to impose.

In fact, Shields, with that quote, has probably done a great deal to help Second Amendment supporters make their case against his agenda, so much so that anti-Second Amendment extremists are forced to find new ways to solve what Shields called “the second problem.” That was, of course, getting all handguns registered.

These days, while some anti-Second Amendment extremists like Sheila Jackson Lee and Bobby Rush openly call for registration (usually in conjunction with licensing), many know that the only thing a push for registration will do is to ignite a groundswell of Second Amendment supporters who will do everything possible to vote them out of office. As a result, they have been trying to find new ways to get registration – and even bans – enacted through the back door.

One of those efforts is via “microstamping,” and HR 719, the MICRO Act, introduced by Representative Anthony Brown (D-MD), is intended to impose this back-door registration/gun ban scheme at the federal level. It’s a really crafty scheme, when you think about it, and it makes Brown a far more dangerous adversary than Jackson Lee or Rush.

Microstamping is intended to place some distinctive marks on the casings ejected from a semiautomatic pistol. According to the text of HR 719, the make, model, and serial number of the gun is to be recorded on the casing. It would also become a federal crime to alter the microstamping. Two years after the bill was passed, no newly built or imported semiautomatic pistol could be sold without this technology.

Even if manufacturers figure out the technological hurdles, for microstamping to work, law enforcement have to know who the owner of the gun that left the casing is. That comes down to some sort of registration system – even if they do not call it that. Which very nicely solves the problem for when they decide to pass a Swalwell-esque bill at some later date.

Also, the penalties for this are civil and administrative as well. This is intended to put a manufacturer or FFL out of business. Especially if the technology isn’t able to be implemented (which gives you a de facto ban on new semi-auto pistols). There is also no guarantee that this technology will even reduce crime. But it will greatly reduce options for those who wish to exercise their Second Amendment rights, especially for personal protection.

The MICRO Act is a scam on the American people. Second Amendment supporters should contact their Senators and Representative and politely urge them to oppose HR 719.


About Harold HutchisonHarold Hutchison

Writer Harold Hutchison has more than a dozen years of experience covering military affairs, international events, U.S. politics and Second Amendment issues. Harold was consulting senior editor at Soldier of Fortune magazine and is the author of the novel Strike Group Reagan. He has also written for the Daily Caller, National Review, Patriot Post, Strategypage.com, and other national websites.

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Bubb
Bubb
26 days ago

Your below the radar line of inquiry is excellent…keep it up.

Hankus
Hankus
1 month ago

So if you want to replace your firing pin with a titanium version, you are SOL. Obviously all parts sales will be made illegal. And that will also put an end to those nasty “ghost guns”.

Random71
Random71
30 days ago
Reply to  Hankus

Ending ghost guns and parts sales, they will try wont they. To bad for them that cat left the bag in the 90s, courtesy of a man in England, where pressure bearing parts are serial numbered. Save this for that certain rainy day.
http://www.thehomegunsmith.com/

Get Out
Get Out
1 month ago

Hmm, let’s see, 400 million guns (And counting) that don’t have Microstamping capability. yeah, Microstamping will solve a lot of shooting crimes.

RJL
RJL
1 month ago

It is Time to eliminate all Communists from the United States of America, they are the greatest Cancer of the Republic…

RoyD
RoyD
1 month ago
Reply to  RJL

If only we could “stamp” them out.

Rock
Rock
1 month ago
Reply to  RoyD

Zackley !

Agostino
Agostino
1 month ago

MD has some of the strictest/most restrictive “gun control” laws on the books in the country, but none affect the homicide rate in Baltimore. Microstamping belongs in the same category as the failed shell casing law now repealed in MD. And as one commenter has pointed out, it will increase the popularity of revolvers.

SiN
SiN
1 month ago

I am not really sure that the people trying to force these laws on to the legal, law abiding citizens understand that the criminal element will not abide by any new or old laws. They should focus on ways to remove the criminals that would make everyone safer.

2NDforever
2NDforever
1 month ago

now everyone will pick up their brass

Rock
Rock
1 month ago
Reply to  2NDforever

I have been doing that for 40 years… Make a habit of it, if YOU don’t reload give it to those who do. The unreloadable stuff, destroy by some means.

cav2108
cav2108
1 month ago

Author’s name was too long, did’t read.

uncle dudley
uncle dudley
1 month ago

Why are these legislators even talking about any new control on guns they are the ones who want to de-fund the police or even do away with them.
They won’t have anyone to work the shooting crimes so why even talk about guns.

wreckless
wreckless
1 month ago

An easy solution to this would be to carry a revolver. All brass remains in the cylinder.

MICHAEL J
MICHAEL J
1 month ago

The micro stamping infringement is already being used in California to systematically eliminate all new semi-auto handguns without that non-existent feature. California has in effect fashioned laws that requires something that hasn’t been made, to be a requirement. New handguns must be approved by the CADOJ or they cannot be sold in California. The state approved handgun roster is an automatic gun removal ploy to reduce all new handguns available for sale. The point is to create laws that no one is willing to comply with and to effectively eliminate a source of guns. California’s handgun list is dwindling and… Read more »

musicman44mag
musicman44mag
1 month ago

More Kommiefornia bullshit. I can’t believe all the garbage they are trying to come up with to stop manufactures from making reliable guns. Ya we have to have them but cops don’t right? How about the technology where you have to have a key or some electronic device to start it like the new cars, they are working on that too. Will cops be required to have these. Don’t get me wrong, I respect and admire law enforcement and appreciate what they do for us and the chances they take on a daily basis but this {just for thee and… Read more »

Random71
Random71
1 month ago
Reply to  musicman44mag

Because of encroachment like this every American gun owner should be familiar with P.A. Luty, and his book Expedient Homemade Firearms.

ForsakenConstitution
ForsakenConstitution
1 month ago

Brass catchers are simple to make, just saying :). I’m curious as too how will this affect those with 80% lowers! I see A LOT of lawsuits coming from people being wrongfully arrested for crimes they didn’t commit. Many LEO’s go to the ranges. If their brass falls into the wrong hands, oh hell. Make notes of those politicians who support this just in case you are wrongfully arrested. Those are the ones you need to sue!

JPM
JPM
1 month ago

So much ignorance and stupidity comes out of Congress (garbage in, garbage out obviously) that it boggles the mind how this nation ever survived. Every time you fire a gun, you are placing the “signature” of the gun on the cartridge case. As a former police forensics specialist with two decades of experience I can assure you that when a cartridge is recovered from a crime scene it is possible to establish not just the caliber of the gun and ammo manufacturer, but also the specific make and model of the gun that fired the cartridge case. The cartridge can… Read more »

Tionico
Tionico
1 month ago
Reply to  JPM

all true.. IF certain other factors cooperate. That chell casing recovered at a shooting scene has no leads to the specific gun tht fired that round. This stupid bill will “fix” that. There is no universal database on the imprint patters of shell casings. Even some states that require the gun be surrendered to stateofficials who will then fire a few rounds from THAT gun and retain the spent casings, have no way of idientifyingwhich gun fired that casing. IF they find a casing somewhere, they have to compare that pattern with hat they have on file. I think it… Read more »

RoyD
RoyD
1 month ago
Reply to  JPM

Really? LOL. You don’t know what you don’t know. So, if I fire a 40 S&W round out of my G32 by either switching the barrel with my G23 or by using one of my several aftermarket G23 barrels then you can tell “the specific make and model of the gun that fired the cartridge case.” The same goes for your claim about the “bullet.” All I need to do is use one of my aftermarket barrels. Or how about when I shoot 40 S&W from my G20 with its factory barrel or one of my aftermarket 10mm barrels. We… Read more »

Ryben Flynn
Ryben Flynn
1 month ago

A registration Bill or Law would conflict with FOPA. Federal Law 18 U.S.C. 926 “No such rule or regulation prescribed [by the Attorney General] after the date of the enactment of the Firearms Owners Protection Act may require that records required to be maintained under this chapter or any portion of the contents of such records, be recorded at or transferred to a facility owned, managed, or controlled by the United States or any State or any political subdivision thereof, nor that any system of registration of firearms, firearms owners, or firearms transactions or disposition be established. Nothing in this… Read more »

Wass
Wass
1 month ago

It never ceases with the anti-gunners. It’s always about gun ownership, never about punishing criminals for misuse of firearms. When a legislator introduces a bill to make it mandatory that additional years be applied to a sentence for bringing a gun to a crime, then I’ll wake up and pay attention to these politicians.

Don
Don
1 month ago
Reply to  Wass

Those laws exist and are plea bargained away.

Finnky
Finnky
1 month ago
Reply to  Wass

– Such laws will be used to punish self defense. Justified shooting or not, you brought a gun to the crime.
Should not matter how someone causes harm, what matters is that they cause harm.

Wass
Wass
1 month ago
Reply to  Finnky

Finnky Of course, if it ever comes that legislators craft legislation as I had suggested, the bills would have to distinguish between legal gun owners and the rest. I know, I know, I know…. many of us in the gun community take the “libertarian” view that guns should be like any other tool, ie., available and sold like nails. hammers and trowels. Well. my friend, that ain’t never gonna happen. So, get over it. We will always be a nation of laws. But if we all stand together in support of the “common sense” gun legislation mentioned above, we might… Read more »

buzzsaw
buzzsaw
1 month ago

So, you go to the range and shoot your gun that puts microstamps on the case, not the primers, as pictured. I have seen a lot of cratered and smeared 9 mm primers on factory ammunition. You pick up your brass and put it in the bucket. I go to the range after you. Since I reload, I, of course, pick up my brass, and I notice that the brass in the bucket is a caliber I load, so I pick it up, too. As it turns out, I am also a criminal. I notice the microstamps. I load them… Read more »

Cruiser
Cruiser
1 month ago
Reply to  buzzsaw

They don’t care, as long as they have somebody to pin the crime on, they have the evidence. How do these “Master Minds” get elected?

GUNFUN
GUNFUN
1 month ago

Why would I want to stamp my bullets? Most of the time, it is very obvious who the shooter was. Moreover, microstamps would be easy to remove and only apply to new (ie, not stolen) firearms, which are rarely used in crimes.